Guide to the Joni Rabinowitz Papers, 1961-2008 AIS.2010.05

ULS Archives & Special Collections

Summary Information

Repository
ULS Archives & Special Collections
Title
Joni Rabinowitz Papers
Creator
Rabinowitz, Joni
Collection Number
AIS.2010.05
Date
1961-2008
Extent
12.0 linear feet (10 boxes; 1 oversize box)
Abstract
This collection contains the papers of Joni Rabinowitz, a Pittsburgh socialist and activist who has been involved in a number of organizations issues, and movements relating to social, political, and economic justice since the 1960s, such as the New American Movement. Included are organizational records, leftist counterculture literature, legal records, personal papers, and materials relating to the many issues, projects and campaigns, in which Rabinowitz has been involved.

Preferred Citation

Joni Rabinowitz Papers, 1961-2008, AIS.2010.05, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

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Biography

Joni Rabinowitz was born on July 30, 1941 in Brooklyn, New York. She grew up in New Rochelle, a suburb of New York City. Her father, Victor, a lawyer, represented trade unions and others whose unpopular ideas made finding legal representation difficult. Although her mother, Marcia, had advanced education, she remained a home maker and became a community activist who worked to integrate the public schools in New Rochelle.

In 1959 Rabinowitz graduated from New Rochelle High School and entered Antioch College, a liberal arts college located in Yellow Springs, Ohio, that offered “cooperative education programs where students alternate between on-campus study and off-campus work.” Having grown up playing the cello, she entered as a Music major, but by her senior year, she changed her major to Political Science. She was active in various left political causes during her college years, including a period in 1963 when she went to Albany, Georgia, to volunteer for voter registration work with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). This was part of her co-op experience at Antioch. While in Georgia, she was arrested three times on the street for vagrancy (charges later dropped), and fasted in jail once for fifteen days and once for nine days. She was also charged with perjury by a federal grand jury and tried along with eight others as the "Albany Nine." Although she was convicted, the 5th Circuit Court eventually reversed the conviction.

In addition to civil rights, Rabinowitz while at Antioch was also active in Fair Play for Cuba (she helped organize a student trip to Cuba at Christmas time 1960), attended the Helsinki Youth Conference in 1961, and worked for peace, free speech and socialism. In 1964, along with over 100 other protestors, Rabinowitz was arrested for demonstrating against a Yellow Springs barber who would not serve African-American patrons. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree at Antioch in 1965.

Rabinowitz completed one year of Social Work school at Adelphi University in New York. During this time, together with students from other social work schools in New York, she worked to support civil rights work in the South. In the summer of 1966, she worked with the California Migrant Ministry in the San Joaquin Valley as a community organizer among Mexican-American farm workers. After this experience, she returned to New York to take a job with the New York City Welfare Department, where she remained until 1969. She was also involved with the local Social Service Employees Union (SSEU), welfare rights, and opposition to the U.S. involvement in Vietnam. Her SSEU involvement lead to her being arrested three times during a strike in 1968. The SSEU was independent, but eventually merged with District Council 31 of AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Workers). Rabinowitz was also part of Movement for a Democratic Society (MDS), a local New York "grown up SDS" which had chapters in the welfare department, teachers, city planners and cab drivers.

While providing draft counseling for the union in New York, she met John Haer, who later became her husband. In 1969 they moved to Pittsburgh where his draft board had sent him to do alternative service at Mayview State Hospital, as a conscientious objector during the Vietnam War.

In the early 1970s Rabinowitz helped organize a 24 hour telephone hotline for youth, known as the "Switchboard," and wrote for and distributed an underground newspaper, the Pittsburgh Fair Witness. Also during this period she worked with the Gulf Action Project and other groups around the country in anti-corporate campaigns. In 1974 Rabinowitz earned a Masters of Social Work degree in community organizing from the University of Pittsburgh.

In 1971 she was a founding member of the New American Movement (NAM). This nationwide socialist-feminist organization promoted democratic socialism, feminism, economic democracy, anti-racism, labor unions, gay rights, anti-war actions, international solidarity, women's rights, civil rights, and utility reform. It aimed to create a broad movement for American socialism. It also had an extensive education program, both internal and also for the public. Additionally, NAM sponsored cultural events, such as films and folk-singers and groups. In 1973 the Pittsburgh chapter produced a slide show, "Pittsburgh 1902, a People's History" and also created a People's History of Pittsburgh wall calendar for 1973. In 1982 NAM merged with the Democratic Socialist Organizing Committee (DSOC) to form the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA). Rabinowitz was one of the minority of members, nationally, who opposed the merger.

Rabinowitz was a leader in both the local and Industrial Heartland Region organizations of NAM. Between 1971 and 1982, she was off-and-on again a Steering Committee member in the Pittsburgh Chapter, and also attended every annual national convention during those ten years. Along with her husband and several others in the Pittsburgh chapter, she was on the committee which published the NAM Newsletter, a monthly publication beginning in 1972, which was mailed to several hundred interested people. In 1982, after the merger, the name changed to the  Allegheny Socialist and was published for several years after that. She was also involved in the Peoples Power Project, a NAM campaign for utility reform, from 1976-1980. In 1974-1975 she worked through NAM on a City Budget Campaign, organized to get Pittsburgh City council to fund more human services.

Between 1979 and 1982, Rabinowitz managed Wobblie Joe's, a small bar on the South Side of Pittsburgh owned by some friends who hoped to bring together the mill-worker culture with the music of Appalachia. The bar had live music every night -- at least two nationally-known figures got their start there: folk singer Anne Feeney and blues singer Ernie Hawkins. Economic problems were the primary cause of the bar's closing in 1982. Rabinowitz and the co-owners also had disagreements with the staff, which were solved by the staff forming a union.

In 1983 Rabinowitz took a job as a public policy advocate for the Hunger Action Coalition. Two years later the organization split and Rabinowitz helped found Just Harvest, an anti-hunger and anti-poverty advocacy organization. She remained as one of two co-directors at Just Harvest until 2010, when she retired. During her 25 years at Just Harvest, she organized on the national, state and local level for public policies which benefit poor and hungry people. These included food stamp policy, school meals, and welfare policies, among others.

Currently, Rabinowitz lives in Pittsburgh with her husband and two cats, Claudette and Tippy. Since her retirement, her activities include volunteering at a cat shelter, being elected to her neighborhood board, gardening, and organizing against Marcellus Shale drilling.

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Scope and Content Notes

The Joni Rabinowitz Papers, which date from 1961 to 2008, document her personal life and constant involvement and devotion to social, political and economic justice issues. Her papers trace her activism in college and the historic civil rights cases she was involved in, her activism in New York City, and her move to Pittsburgh where she helped found the local chapter of the New American Movement (NAM). A majority of the collection documents her involvement in a number of leftist/socialist organizations like the NAM, Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), Voter REP, and the Rainbow Political Action Committee. Devoted to bringing awareness to social and economic inequality, she was involved in a number of movements and organizations regarding race, class, hunger, and welfare rights. Her papers also demonstrate her political concerns and intellectual interests through literature she collected concerning issues and organizations that existed throughout the 1960s and 1970s.

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Arrangement

The collection is divided into six series, five of which have been further arranged into subseries. Folders within subseries are organized alphabetically, excluding the series devoted to campaigns and legal cases, which are organized chronologically. Additional scope and content notes are found at the series and subseries level.

Series I. New American Movement (NAM)

Series II. Democratic Socialists of America (DSA)

Series III. Campaign Involvement

Series IV. Topics and Organizations

Series V. Literature

Series VI. Personal

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

ULS Archives & Special Collections, August 2011

University of Pittsburgh Library System
Archives & Special Collections
Website: library.pitt.edu/archives-special-collections
412-648-3232 (ASC) | 412-648-8190 (Hillman)
Contact Us: www.library.pitt.edu/ask-archivist

Access Restrictions

No restrictions.

Copyright

The University of Pittsburgh holds the property rights to the material in this collection, but the copyright may still be held by the original creator/author. Researchers are therefore advised to follow the regulations set forth in the U.S. Copyright Code when publishing, quoting, or reproducing material from this collection without the consent of the creator/author or that go beyond what is allowed by fair use.

Acquisition Information

Gift of Joni Rabinowitz in 2010 and 2011.

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Jennifer Needham in spring/summer 2011.

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Related Materials

Related Material

Rabinowitz Social Service Unionism Collection, 1957-1969, AIS.1980.19, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

New American Movement, Pittsburgh Chapter Records, 1973-1982, AIS.1989.18, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Paul J. LeBlanc Papers, 1968-1998, AIS.1974.17, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Robert Opie Shepherd Papers Relating to the Democratic Socialists of America, AIS.1990.21, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Political and Social Activist Movements Collection, 1968-1975, AIS.1974.17, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

James Dolsen Political Left Pamphlets Collection, 1918-1996, AIS.1999.11, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

Lawrence F. Evans Collection, 1978-1988, AIS.1988.17, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • Antioch College.
  • Democratic Socialists of America. Pittsburgh Chapter.
  • Democratic Socialists of America.
  • Just Harvest (Organization).
  • Movement for a Democratic Society.
  • National Rainbow Coalition (U.S.).
  • New American Movement (Organization). Pittsburgh Chapter.
  • New American Movement (Organization).
  • Social Service Employees Union.
  • Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.).

Genre(s)

  • Correspondence

Occupation(s)

  • Activists

Personal Name(s)

  • Jackson, Jesse, 1941-
  • Rabinowitz, Joni
  • Rabinowitz, Victor

Subject(s)

  • Associations
  • Civil rights -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Civil rights -- United States
  • Feminism -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Feminism -- United States
  • Labor movement -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Labor movement -- United States
  • Personal papers
  • Political activists -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Political activists -- United States
  • Politics
  • Radicalism -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Radicalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century
  • Social action
  • Social movements -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Welfare rights movement -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
  • Welfare rights movement -- United States
  • Women

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Collection Inventory

Series  I. New American Movement (NAM), 1971-1985 

Scope and Content Notes

This series documents the regional chapter of the New American Movement (NAM) and Rabinowitz's involvement in the organization. The series is divided into six subseries according to the functions, activities, projects, and interests of the organization. Additional materials concerning NAM can be found in the separate collection held by the Archives Service Center: New American Movement, Pittsburgh Chapter Records, 1973-1982, AIS.1989.18.

Originally founded in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1971 as a result of the anti-war movement, NAM was established in an effort to build a “new left.” Shortly after, regional chapters were established throughout the country. At its height, NAM had chapters in about 30 places (many of them being campuses) with about 5,000 members. It was supported by dues, fundraisers and donations. The organization stressed the importance of “political work and mass organizing as a means for transformation” and worked to “develop programs that would unify working people and catalyze a large mass movement for socialism.” Classism, sexism, racism, imperialism, and capitalism were many of the issues the organization advocated against. The organization was also concerned with a host of international issues concerning Spain, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and China. As a founding member of the Pittsburgh chapter, part of the steering committee, and primary creator of the chapter newsletter, Rabinowitz was heavily involved and committed to the organization. She also attended all of the national conventions.

In 1971, Rabinowitz helped found the Pittsburgh chapter. The chapter initially committed itself to anti-war activities -- organizing panel discussions, demonstrations, and pickets. In 1973 it helped fight for the impeachment of President Nixon. Due to the labor climate of the time, the organization eventually became heavily involved in workplace organizing, as well as social services and political education. Within the NAM were a number of commissions, such as the Energy Commission, that in 1975 devoted a considerable amount of time to speaking against the energy industry and its impending rate hikes, which included Duquesne Light. The Pennsylvania Alliance for Jobs and Energy (PAJE) is a result of this, an organization Rabinowitz helped start.

Subseries  1. Internal Business, 1972-1982 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries, organized alphabetically, documents the organizational structure of NAM and its role within the scope of the national organization. Included are the chapter structure and by-laws, chapter history, internal reports, member lists, correspondence, records of the national interim committee, and instructions for chapter leaders. It also documents the organization's eventual merger in 1983 with the Democratic Socialists of America. The New American Movement, Pittsburgh Chapter Records, 1973-1982, AIS.1989.18, contain additional materials relating to internal business.

  BoxFolder
Chapter Evaluations, 1980 11
  Folder
Chapter Structure and By-Laws, 1975-1978 2
  Folder
Contacts, 1975-1977 3
  Folder
Correspondence, 1972-1976 4
  Folder
Correspondence, 1976-1981 5
  Folder
Instructions on Leadership, 1977-1978 6
  Folder
Internal Reports, 1973-1979 7
  Folder
Names and Addresses for Local and National Chapters and Members, undated 8
  Folder
National and Regional Chapter Reports, 1975-1981 9
  Folder
National Interim Committee Candidacy Statements, undated 10
  Folder
National Interim Committee Endorsements, 1975 11
  Folder
National Interim Committee Resolutions, 1981 12
  Folder
Newsletter Plans which Include Personal Notes, 1976-1982 13
  Folder
Personal Correspondence, 1980-1981 14
  Folder
Phone Tree, 1974-1978 15
  Folder
Pittsburgh Chapter History, 1972-1977 16
  Folder
Proposal for New Orientation Program, undated 17
  Folder
Recruitment Guidelines, 1981-1982 18
  Folder
Response Against Socialist Worker's Party Endorsements, 1978 19
  Folder
Speakers Bureau and Fundraising Brochures, 1975 20
  Folder
Staff Job Descriptions, 1976-1977 21
  Folder
Steering Committee Notes, 1975-1977 22
  Folder
Strategy Papers, 1977-1978 23
  Folder
What is the NAM, undated 24
  Folder
Various Materials, 1980 25

Subseries  2. Publications, 1973-1981 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains the various publications that NAM produced, especially those of the local chapter. Organized alphabetically, the publications include general mailings sent to members of the local chapter which reported on the various happenings of the organization; the chapter newsletter, which Rabinowitz was instrumental in the creation and distribution of; and various leaflets announcing chapter meetings and events. The collection originally included a substantial amount of national NAM materials like instructional guides for organizing and running chapters, the national newsletter Moving On, and national discussion bulletins, but these materials were eliminated due to being already included in the “New American Movement, Pittsburgh Chapter Records” collection.

  Folder
Chapter General Mailings, 1977-1978 26
  Folder
Chapter General Mailings, 1979-1981 27
  Folder
Chapter Mailings, 1974-1975 28
  Folder
Chapter Mailings, 1975-1976 29
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, October 1972 30
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, January-November 1973 31
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, March and Jul-Oct 1974 32
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, January-December 1975 33
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, Feb-Sep 1976 and December 1976 34
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, February-December 1977 35
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, January-December 1978 36
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, January 1979-January 1980 37
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, February-December 1980 38
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, January-December 1981 39
  Folder
Chapter Newsletter, January-December 1982 40
  Folder
Literature, 1975 41
  Folder
Leaflets, 1974-1975 42
  Folder
Papers by Frank Ackerman, Leon Blum, Harry C. Boyte, Logan Martinez, and Ed Meek, 1973-1976 43

Subseries  3. Events, 1973-1985 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries documents the various events the Pittsburgh chapter of NAM conducted or was involved in. Folders are organized alphabetically and include materials that document the local and national conferences and conventions, most of which Rabinowitz attended, as well as the film and dinner series, concerts and various other events held for or by the organization.

  BoxFolder
Conferences, Conventions, and Events, 1975-1981 21
  Folder
Events, 1976-1985 2
  Folder
Film and Dinner Series, 1972 3
  Folder
Films, 1979-1984 4
  Folder
Fundraising Party Invitation, 1978 5
  Folder
"A Morality Play" for the Pittsburgh Counter-Inaugural Ball, 1980 6
  Folder
National Council Conference, 1974 7
  Folder
National NAM Utilities Conference, 1977 8
  Folder
Robin Tyler Concerts Planning, 1981-1983 9
  Folder
Solidarity Day and Aftermath, 1981 10
  Folder
Vietnam Peace Treaty Celebration, 1973 11

Subseries  4. Projects, 1976-1982 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains materials that document the various NAM projects that Rabinowitz was involved in. Folders are organized alphabetically. The People's History Project and The People's Power Project make up a large portion of this subseries. The People's History Project was created in order to bring awareness to the region's labor history which resulted in the creation of a slideshow and people's history calendar. The People's Power Project was created in reaction to the energy crisis and acted as a form of outreach in order to bring awareness to the issue and inspire greater public involvement. In 1976 the People's Power Project testified at hearings for a Lifeline bill in order to push for energy rate restructuring. Rabinowitz, an experienced fundraiser, was responsible for the creation of the advertising book included in this subseries.

  Folder
Advertising Book, 1981 12
  Folder
Energy Commission Newsletter, 1979-1981 13
  Folder
Feminism in Chapters, 1976-1982 14
  Folder
Lifeline, 1975-1978 15
  Folder
Lifeline Membership Lists, 1976 16
  Folder
National Materials from NAM Utilities Project, 1974-1979 17
  Folder
Pennsylvania Utility Commission Hearings, 1975-1977 18
  Folder
People's History Calendar Planning, 1974 19
  Folder
People's History Project Correspondence Concerning the "1905 A People's History" Slideshow, 1973-1976 20
  Folder
People's History Slideshow Proposal, 1974-1975 21
  Folder
People's Power Project, 1975-1979 22
  Folder
People's Power Project Newsletters, 1975-1977 23
  Folder
People's Power Project Notes and Minutes, 1975-1980 24
  Folder
People's Power Project Slideshow Scripts, undated 25
  Folder
People's Power Project Media Coverage, 1975-1977 26
  Folder
Political Education Committee, 1973-1978 27
  Folder
Socialist School, 1975-1980 28
  Folder
Workplace Organizing Taskforce, 1973-1975 29

Subseries  5. Issues, 1973-1983 

Scope and Content Notes

Organized alphabetically, this subseries documents the local, national, and international issues NAM was involved or interested in. Often times, these subject files were utilized for NAM projects and literature. Topics include abortion, anti-Nixon, gay rights, and women's issues, just to name a few. This is not a complete reflection of the organization's interests and involvement, but rather represents the issues that Rabinowitz kept materials on.

  Folder
Abortion, 1978-1983 30
  Folder
Anti-Nixon, 1973 31
  Folder
Attica, 1976 32
  Folder
Cuba, 1973-1974 33
  Folder
Gay Rights, 1977-1979 34
  Folder
JP Stevens Boycott, 1976-1979 35
  Folder
Local and National Nuclear Issues, 1975-1979 36
  Folder
National Health Security in Pittsburgh, 1977-1979 37
  Folder
Puerto Rican Solidarity, 1967-1976 38
  Folder
Reproductive Rights, 1978-1979 39
  Folder
University of Pittsburgh Faculty Organizing, 1976 40
  Folder
Vietnam, 1973 41
  Folder
Women, 1973-1981 42

Subseries  6. Related Organizations, 1971-1985 

Scope and Content Notes

NAM helped found and was involved in a number of local organizations. While these organizations fell under the auspices of NAM or were led by NAM members, they did not claim NAM affiliation since people during the time were often reluctant to join socialist organizations. The Pennsylvania Alliance for Jobs and Energy, the Public Power Movement, and the Coalition for Human Needs are examples of this. This subseries includes organizational records and is organized alphabetically.

  BoxFolder
Anti-Vietnam, National Organizations, 1971-1976 31
  Folder
Big Red Food Club Collective, 1974 2
  Folder
Coalition for Human Needs, 1973-1974 3
  Folder
Coalition for Human Needs City Budget Campaign, 1972-1974 4-5
  Folder
Coalition for Human Needs City Budget Campaign Press Coverage, 1973-1974 6
  Folder
National Committee Against Repressive Legislation and the Criminal Reform Act of 1975 (S1), 1975-1982 7
  Folder
New Jewish Agenda, 1972-1982 8
  Folder
Pennsylvania Alliance for Jobs and Energy (PAJE), 1979-1980 9
  Folder
Pennsylvania Alliance for Jobs and Energy (PAJE), 1977-1979 10
  Folder
PAJE Newsletter, 1982-1983,1986 11
  Folder
PAJE Advertising Handbook, Fundraising and Planning, 1981 12
  Folder
Pittsburgh Against Apartheid, 1982-1983 13
  Folder
Pittsburgh Neighborhood Alliance, 1980-1983 14
  Folder
Public Power Movement, 1976-1980 15
  Folder
South Africa and Pittsburgh, 1985 16
  Folder
Utilities Task Force, 1975-1980 17

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Series  II. Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), 1982-1992 

Scope and Content Notes

In 1982 the Democratic Socialist Organizing Committee and the New American Movement merged to form the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), a merger opposed by Rabinowitz. Nonetheless, she was active in the DSA as a member of the national executive committee and she served as a Pittsburgh delegate at the 1983 DSA conference in New York City. The series includes organizational records, various publications, events, and committees and projects the organization was involved in. The series is divided into four subseries which are organized alphabetically. For further information on the DSA, please see the Robert Opie Shepherd Papers Relating to the Democratic Socialists of America, AIS.1990.21 held by the Archives Service Center.

Subseries  1. Internal Business, 1982-1992 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries documents the organizational structure of the DSA and includes by-laws, correspondence, financial records, and membership lists which are organized alphabetically. Also included are some of Rabinowitz's personal notebooks from chapter meetings which reflect many of her personal views and thoughts about the organization. The statement concerning "New Directions for DSA" provides further insight into the merger.

  Folder
By-laws, 1983 18
  Folder
Correspondence, 1984 19
  Folder
Finances, 1983 20-21
  Folder
Fundraising, 1984 22
  Folder
History of Organization, 1982 23
  Folder
Membership, 1982 24
  Folder
National Board, 1983 25
  Folder
National Constitution and By-laws, 1982-1983 26
  Folder
National Mailings, 1982-1985 27
  Folder
Personal Notebook, 1982-1983 28
  Folder
Personal Notebooks from Meetings, 1982 29
  Folder
Personal Notebooks from Meetings, 1983 30
  Folder
Phone Bank and Contributions, 1992 31
  Folder
Photographs Used in Newsletters and Leaflets, undated 32
  Folder
Statement Concerning New Directions for DSA, 1986 33

Subseries  2. Publications, 1982-1986 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains the various publications created by the Pittsburgh chapter of the DSA and includes newsletters, brochures, chapter mailings (which provide organizational news and announcements), and other various pieces of literature created by the organization. The literature is organized alphabetically. Because the "Robert Opie Shepherd Papers Relating to the Democratic Socialists of America, AIS.1990.21" already contains a significant amount of DSA publications, especially the Allegheny Socialist, only those which were not duplicates were kept in this collection.

  Folder
Allegheny Socialist, February 1992-January 1994 34
  Folder
Brochures, undated 36
  Folder
Chapter Mailings, 1987-1988 35
  BoxFolder
Feminist Perspectives on the Family, 1982 41
  Folder
Pittsburgh Chapter News Sheets, 1982-1986 2

Subseries  3. Events, 1982-1991 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries documents regional and national DSA conventions and conferences, various events the Pittsburgh chapter hosted, and other events chapter members attended. Folders are organized alphabetically.

  Folder
Basic Political Skills Training Conference, 1982 3
  Folder
"Candidates Nite," 1983 4
  Folder
"Candidates Nite," 1987 5
  Folder
"Candidates Nite" for Pittsburgh City Council and School Board, 1985 6
  Folder
Films, 1985-1991 7
  Folder
First DSA Statewide Conference, 1984 8
  Folder
Fred Small Concert Planning, 1982-1983 9
  Folder
Kristin Lems Concert, 1987 10
  Folder
Labor Conference, Detroit, 1985 11
  Folder
Michael Harrington Event, 1982 12
  Folder
Merger Convention, 1982 13
  Folder
National Board Conference, Philadelphia, 1984 14
  Folder
National Convention, New York, 1983 15-16
  Folder
National Convention Resolutions, 1983 17
  Folder
National Convention, Berkeley, 1985 18
  Folder
Second DSA Statewide Meeting, 1984 19
  Folder
Twentieth Anniversary Civil Rights March on Washington, 1983 20

Subseries  4. Committees and Projects, 1982-1987 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries documents the many committees and projects that DSA members formed based on international, political, and local issues as well as organizational needs. Folders are organized alphabetically.

  Folder
Anti-Racism Commission and Latino Commission, 1982-1984 21
  Folder
Democratic Socialist Political Action Committee, 1980-1987 22
  Folder
Feminist Commission, 1982-1985 23
  Folder
Institute for Democratic Socialism, 1983 24
  Folder
International Affairs Committee, 1983 25
  Folder
Labor Commission, 1982-1985 26
  Folder
National Advocacy Campaign, 1983 27
  Folder
National Executive Committee 1982 28-30
  Folder
National Executive Committee, 1983 31
  Folder
National Speaker's Bureau, 1982-1983 32
  Folder
Religion and Socialism Commission, undated 33
  Folder
Urban and Community Commission, undated 34

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Series  III. Campaign Involvement, 1981-2008 

Scope and Content Notes

This series documents Rabinowitz's involvement in local, regional, and national political campaigns throughout the 1980s and 1990s as well as local political action organizations like Project Vote and Voter REP, The Rainbow Coalition, and the Rainbow Political Action Committee. The series is divided into four subseries. The folders of each subseries are organized alphabetically, excluding "campaigns" which are organized in chronological order. Some of what is included are campaign materials, campaign volunteer recruitment materials, records concerning voter registration, and internal business records from the organizations Rabinowitz was a member of.

Subseries  1. Campaigns, 1981-2008 

Scope and Content Notes

Organized chronologically, this subseries documents the many local, regional, and national political campaigns Rabinowitz was involved in as a campaign volunteer, director, and organizer and includes campaign materials, volunteer materials, correspondence and press.

  Folder
John Zingaro for City Council, 1981 35
  Folder
District Election Campaign, 1981 36
  Folder
Jonathan Robinson for City Council, 1982-1983 37
  Folder
Jim Young for Congress, 1984 38
  Folder
Richard Adams for State Representative, 1984 39
  Folder
Election Day, 1985 40
  Folder
Jim Ferlo for City Council, 1985 41
  Folder
Allen Kukovich for Governer, 1985-1986 42
  Folder
Bob Edgar for Senate, 1986 44
  Folder
Coalition for District Elections, 1985-1987 43
  Folder
Bob Edgar for Senate Phone Bank, 1986 45
  Folder
Bob Edgar for Senate Volunteers, 1986 46
  Folder
Bob Edgar for Senate, Personal Notebook, 1986 47
  Folder
Organizing and Campaigning, 1986 50
  Folder
Election Day Volunteer Assignments, 1986 49
  Folder
Campaign Volunteers List, 1987 51
  Folder
Doris A. Smith Election for Judge of Commonwealth Court, 1987 52
  Folder
Cynthia Baldwin Primary Election for Court of Common Pleas, 1987 53
  Folder
NRC National Convention, Personal Notes, 1987 54
  BoxFolder
Jesse Jackson Campaign Correspondence, 19871988 51
  Folder
Jackson Campaign, Personal Notebooks, 1987-1988 2
  Folder
Election Day, 1986 2a
  Folder
Jackson and the Jewish Vote, 1987-1988 3
  Folder
Jackson Presidential Primary Materials, 1987-1988 4
  Folder
Jackson Campaign, Local Delegates, 1988 5
  Folder
Jackson Campaign Phone Bank Volunteers, undated 6
  Folder
Labor for Jackson, 1988 7
  Folder
Jackson Post-Election Analysis, 1988 8
  Folder
Primary, Pittsburgh Wards, 1988 9
  Folder
Rick Adams for City Council, 1989 10
  Folder
Terry Chalich for State Legislature, 1990 11
  Folder
Lynn Yaekel for Senate, 1992 12
  Folder
Rick Adams for City Council, 1994 13
  Folder
Allen Kukovich for Senate, 1996 14
  Folder
14th Ward Primary, 1997 15
  Folder
Rabinowitz and Haer for Democratic Committee People, 1998 16
  Folder
Local Primary, 1999 17
  Folder
Local Elections, 1999 18
  Folder
Allen Kukovich for Lt. Governor Phone Bank, 2001-2002 19
  Folder
Allen Kukovich for Governor Primary, 2002 20
  Folder
John Kerry for President, 2004 21
  Folder
May Primary Elections, 2005 22
  Folder
May Primaries and Ward Chair Election, 2006 23
  Folder
Presidential Election, 2007-2008 24

Subseries  2. Project Vote and Voter Registration in Pittsburgh (REP), 1983-1988 

Scope and Content Notes

Organized alphabetically, this subseries documents Rabinowitz's involvement in the voter registration activities of two related organizations, Project VOTE! and Voter REP (Registration, Education, and Participation). Voter REP was a local affiliate of Project VOTE!, a national organization based in Washington, D.C. Due to the related goals and relationship between the two organizations, many of the materials in this subseries are mixed.

Formed in 1986, Voter REP was a nonprofit charitable and educational organization committed to registering voters and increasing the political participation of blacks, women, low-income areas, youth, and disabled peoples. Rabinowitz worked for Voter REP as a coordinator. The organization was located in the offices of the Hunger Action Coalition and grew out of prior Pittsburgh organizations committed to voter registration like the Alliance for Voter Registration. Materials include records pertaining to internal functions of the organization, volunteer recruitment, voter registration drives, newsletters, workshops, and press. Also included are records pertaining to the organization's fight against welfare and unemployment offices who refused the entry of volunteers in order to register people, a fight which eventually led to court.

  Folder
Accounting, 1986 25
  Folder
Campaign Analysis, 1983 26
  Folder
Correspondence, 1984 27
  Folder
Freedom Summer Voter Registration Campaign, 1984 28
  Folder
Grant Administration, 1986 29
  Folder
History of Organization, 1988 30
  Folder
Job Descriptions, 1984 31
  Folder
Letter to Thornburgh Regarding Voter Registration, 1986 32
  Folder
Logbook, 1984 33
  Folder
Meetings, 1984 34
  Folder
Monthly Schedules, 1986 35
  Folder
Newsletters, 1986 36
  Folder
Newspaper Clippings, 1984 37
  Folder
Original Proposal for the Organization, 1986 38
  Folder
Phone Banks, 1984-1986 39
  Folder
Political Workshops, 1984-1994 40
  Folder
Pre-District Election Campaign, 1986 41
  Folder
Press, 1986 42
  Folder
Project Vote Instructions, 1986 43
  Folder
Public Service Announcements and Media, 1986 44
  Folder
Suit and Injunction, 1983-1986 45-46
  Folder
Volunteer Recruitment, 1986 47
  Folder
Voter Registration Campaign, 1984 48
  Folder
Voter Registration Activities, 1983 49
  Folder
Voter Registration for Non-Profits, 1983-1984 50
  Folder
Voter Registration Report, 1986 51
  Folder
Voter Registration Statistics, 1986 52
  Folder
Voters with Disabilities, 1984 53

Subseries  3. The Rainbow Coalition and The Rainbow Political Action Committee, 1985-1990 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries documents The National Rainbow Coalition (NRC), now the Rainbow Push Coalition, and The Rainbow Political Action Committee (Rainbow PAC). Arranged alphabetically, it includes meeting minutes, by-laws, mailing lists, and national NRC materials. The Rainbow Coalition grew out of Jesse Jackson's 1984 presidential campaign. The coalition was and still is a national organization committed to social justice, civil rights and political activism. It was founded in order to help support candidates for public office dedicated to improving the lives of the powerless. Rabinowitz helped run the Rainbow PAC which functioned as a political action committee based on progressive politics and committed to social justice, democracy and solidarity. Although the Rainbow PAC was inspired by the NRC, they remained unconnected to the National Rainbow Coalition and free from the rules of the NRC.

  Folder
Annual Meeting of Rainbow PAC, 1989 54
  Folder
By-Laws of Rainbow PAC, undated 55
  Folder
Candidate Endorsements for Primaries, 1989 56
  Folder
Fundraising Letters and Lists, 1988 57
  Folder
Mailings, 1987-1988 58
  Folder
Mailing List, 1988 59
  Folder
Meeting Attendance, 1988-1989 60
  Folder
Meeting Minutes, 1987-1988 61
  Folder
National Materials, 1987-1990 62
  Folder
Questionnaire Developed for Local Primary, 1989 63
  Folder
The Rainbow Report, 1989-1990 64
  Folder
State Convention of the Pennsylvania Rainbow Coalition, 1988 65

Subseries  4. 14th Ward Independent Democratic Club, 1985-2008 

Scope and Content Notes

Documented in this subseries is the 14th Ward Independent Democratic Club, of which Rabinowitz was an active participant and member of the board. Materials are organized alphabetically and include the constitution and by-laws, board business, correspondence, events, newsletters and mailings. The organization was founded in 1980 in order to support progressive politics and the principles of the Democratic Party. The club also held forums and discussions in order to help solve community problems. Additionally, the club also worked to endorse and support candidates committed to the same principles established by the club, distributing voters guides before primaries and elections in order to help inform community members.

  Folder
Board Business, 2000-2007 66
  Folder
Campaign for Kerry, Edwards, and Hoeffel, 2004 67
  Folder
Constitution and By-Laws, 2006 68
  Folder
Correspondence, 2005-2008 69
  Folder
Events, 1998-2007 70
  Folder
Meetings, 2005 71
  Folder
Member Lists, 2004-2007 72
  Folder
Newsletters and Mailings, 1985-2006 73

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Series  IV. Topics and Organizations, 1963-1982 

Scope and Content Notes

Rabinowitz collected an array of materials that illustrate the social, political, and economic issues that she experienced throughout the 1960s and 1970s. These materials provide a glimpse into the issues and organizations that emerged during this period. Included are pamphlets, fliers, letters, press, and organizational materials. The series is divided into three subseries divided by topics, local organizations, and national organizations.

Subseries  1. Topics, 1965-1983 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains an array of materials that Rabinowitz collected throughout the 1960s and 1970s that demonstrate her interests and concerns; it is organized alphabetically. She kept the materials organized in files according to topics which range from international issues, to labor issues, draft resistance, and socialism.

  BoxFolder
Black Power Movement, 1968-1978 61
  Folder
Chile, 1973-1979 2
  Folder
China, 1965-1976 3
  Folder
Civil Rights and Racism, 1963-1983 4
  Folder
Communes, 1973 5
  Folder
Conscientious Objection, 1967-1969 6
  Folder
Criminal Code Reform Act, 1979 7
  Folder
Draft Resistance, 1966-1970 8
  Folder
Health, undated 9
  Folder
GI Movement and Amnesty, 1973-1974 10
  Folder
Indochina, 1974-1975 11
  Folder
Labor Issues, Local and Regional, 1975-1979 12
  Folder
Labor and Unions, 1975-1982 13
  Folder
Labor Related Films, 1970 14
  Folder
Labor, Safe Energy, and Anti-Nuke, 1979-1981 15
  Folder
Labor, United Aircraft and Olin Drug, 1969-1970 16
  Folder
Labor, United Auto Workers, 1964-1979 17
  Folder
Labor and Workplace Health Issues, 1979-1980 18
  Folder
Marxist-Leninist Groups, 1975 19
  Folder
Military Intervention, Disarmament, and Conversion, 1977-1981 20
  Folder
National Student Conference Against Racism, Pittsburgh, 1974-1976 21
  Folder
National Tax Organizing, 1972-1974 22
  Folder
The New Right, 1978-1981 23
  Folder
New York City Issues and Organizations, 1968-1969 24
  Folder
Socialism, undated 25
  Folder
Vietnam, 1965-1966 26
  Folder
Worker Ownership, 1982 27

Subseries  2. Local Organizations, 1969-1980 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries is organized alphabetically and includes material Rabinowitz collected concerning local social justice and activist organizations that emerged in the 1970s and include literature, fliers and brochures.

  Folder
Anti-Vietnam Organizations, 1972-1976 28
  Folder
Committee of Concerned Unionists, 1978 29
  Folder
Pittsburgh Area Committee on Occupational Safety and Health, 1972-1974 30
  Folder
Pittsburgh Chapter Coalition if Labor Union Women, 1974-1975 31
  Folder
Pittsburgh Committee Against Registration and the Draft Card (CARD), 1980 32
  Folder
Pittsburgh Neighborhood Alliance, 1974-1975 33
  Folder
Pittsburgh Radical Women's Union, 1973 34
  Folder
Pittsburgh Chapter of Students for a Democratic Society, 1969 35
  Folder
Political Prisoner's Solidarity Committee, 1971-1978 36
  Folder
Professional Air Traffic Controller's Organization, undated 37
  Folder
Western Pennsylvania Coalition to Support the United Mine Workers, 1972-1979 38

Subseries  3. National Organizations, 1965-1996 

Scope and Content Notes

Rabinowitz collected the materials of a number of social justice and activist organizations that emerged between 1965 and 1996. This subseries contains literature, fliers and pamphlets produced by these organizations and is organized alphabetically.

  Folder
Bay Area Revolutionary Union, 1971 39
  Folder
Berkeley Women's Movement, 1972 40
  Folder
Committee of Returned Volunteers, 1969-1970 41
  Folder
Free Speech Movement, 1965-1966 42
  Folder
International Socialists, 1979 43
  Folder
Italian Communist Party, 1976-1978 44
  Folder
Labor Party Advocates, 1991-1996 45
  Folder
National Caucus of Labor Committees (NCLC), 1966-1969 46
  Folder
New Alliance Party, undated 47
  Folder
New York Peace and Freedom Party, 1968-1969 48
  Folder
North American Congress on Latin America, undated 49
  Folder
North American Farm Alliance, 1984 50
  BoxFolder
Radical Historian's Organization, 1971-1980 71-2
  Folder
Seattle Liberation Front, 1968-1969 3
  Folder
US Committee for a Democratic Spain, 1972-1976 4
  Folder
The Weather Underground, 1981 5
  Folder
Radical Education Project, 1968-1969 6

Return to Table of Contents »


Series  V. Literature, 1966-1990 

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains an array of leftist, socialist, activist, radical and counterculture literature that Rabinowitz collected throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Materials are organized alphabetically and include newsletters, papers, and journals created both independently and by organizations like the Radical Education Project.

  BoxFolder
Against the Grain, No. 1 1976 81
  Folder
The American Labor Movement Today: a collection of facts and analyses, 1969 2
  Folder
The American Working Class in Transition By: Kim Moody, undated 3
  Folder
Akwesasne Notes, Late Spring 1974 4
  Folder
Automation and the Abolition of the Market By: Edward J. Nell, 1967 5
  Folder
The Bill of Rights Journal, Winter 1988 6
  Folder
Black Workers in Revolt By: Robert Dudnick, 1969 7
  Folder
Bread and Roses, By: Kathy McAfee and Myrna Wood, 1969 8
  Folder
Breaking The Ice Vol. 1 No. 1, 3, and 6, 1973-1974 9
  Folder
Buffalo Labor: A History of Militant Struggle, undated 10
  Folder
The Contradiction of Advanced Capitalist Society and Its Resolution By: Martin Nicolaus, undated 11
  Folder
Cops are Hired to Enforce the Laws, undated 12
  Folder
Crisis, Vol. 1 No. 11 and 19, 1971-1972 13
  Folder
Dayton Women Working, Vol. 2 No. 7, 1978 14
  Folder
The Decline of American Radicalism in the Twentieth Century By: Gabriel Kolko, undated 15
  Folder
The Demand for Black Labor By: Harold M. Baron 1971 16
  Folder
Distribution Newsletter No. 2, 1971 17
  Folder
Eight Months at Essex By: Kim Moody and Elissa Clarke, undated 18
  Folder
El Grito Del Norte, Vol. 6 No. 4, 1973 19
  Folder
El Malcriado, 1966-1967 20
  Folder
Erie Free Press, Vol. 1 No. 3,9,12, 1974-1975 21
  Folder
Excerpts from a New Songbook, undated 22
  Folder
Free West Indian, Vol. 1 No. 50 and Vol. 2 No. 2,10,11,14, 1980-1981 23
  Folder
From the Horses Mouth, Vol. 4 No. 5, 1978 24
  Folder
Grass Roots, Vol. 3 No. 2, 1974 25
  Folder
The Green Mountain Quarterly, No. 1 and 3, 1975-1976 26
  Folder
The Grove Street Grapevine, May 1974 27
  Folder
Health Rights News, Vol. 8 No. 1, 1975 28
  Folder
How Harvard Rules, undated 29
  Folder
How to Counterfeit Credit Cards and Get Away with it, undated 30
  Folder
I am Furious (Female), undated 31
  Folder
Just Economics, 1973-1975 32
  Folder
Labor and the South By: Robert Analavage, 1968 33
  Folder
Labor History Calendar, 1976 34
  Folder
Labor Notes, No. 130 and 132, 1990 35
  Folder
Metropolis and Movement Life By: Evan Stark, undated 36
  Folder
A New Era of Labor Revolt By: Stanley Weir 1968 37
  Folder
New Patriot, Vol.1 No. 1, 1978 38
  Folder
New Unity, Vol. 1 No. 1 and 8, 1972 39
  Folder
New University Conference Crisis Paper, 1970 40
  Folder
New York Workers' News and Perspective, No. 1, 1976 41
  Folder
Notes from the First Year: New York Radical Women, 1968 42
  Folder
Notes on Left Propaganda/How to Spread the Word, undated 43
  Folder
On Campus in Amerika, 1970 44
  Folder
The Organizer, Vol.4 No. 5, 1978 45
  Folder
Party and Class, 1975 46
  Folder
Perspectives for Radicals By: Stanley Aronowitz, 1968 47
  Folder
The Politics of Housework By: Pat Mainardi, undated 48
  Folder
Poor White Women By: Roxanne Dunbar, undated 49
  Folder
Power in American Society By: Jim Jacobs, undated 50
  Folder
Quantum, September, 1972 51
  Folder
The Realist Presents: The Last Supplement, March 1971 52
  Folder
RECON, Vol. 1 No. 7, 1976 53
  Folder
The Red Papers, No. 2-3, 1969-1970 54
  Folder
Resist, January, April and June, 1978 55
  Folder
Roadblock to Revolution: A Radical Critique of the Progressive Labor Party, By: Edward Greer and Charles Lengram, 1969 56
  Folder
Self Reliance, No. 10, 1977 57
  Folder
Sex Roles and Female Oppression By: Dana Densmore, undated 58
  Folder
Socialist Feminism: A Strategy for the Women's Movement, 1975 59
  Folder
Socialist Platform, 1960 60
  Folder
South of the River, Vol. 1 No. 6, 1973 61
  Folder
The Stages of Economic Stagnation By: John H. Coatsworth, undated 62
  Folder
Studies on the Left, No. 1 Vol. 3, 1960 63
  Folder
The Subversion of Collective Bargaining By: Daniel Bell, 1960 64
  Folder
To Build a Union By: Harry Anderson, 1961 65
  Folder
Toward a Female Liberation Movement By: Beverly Jones and Judith Brown, undated 66
  Folder
Tricontinental No. 16, 1970 67
  Folder
United Labor Action, Vol. 4 No. 4, 1974 68
  Folder
The United Express, Vol. 1 No. 4, 1966 69
  Folder
US Imperialism By: David Gilbert and David Loud, 1968 70
  Folder
The Utah Coordinator, Vol. 1 No. 3 and Vol. 2 No. 4-5, 1967-1968 71
  Folder
Who Rules Somerville, 1973 72
  Folder
Why We Strike, undated 73
  Folder
The Wisconsin Patriot, Vol. 6 No. 4, 1976 74
  Folder
Women: A Journal of Liberation, Vol. 1 No. 4, Vol 2 No. 3-4 and Vol. 3 No. 1, 1970-1972 75
  Folder
Womankind, Vol. 3 No. 3, 1973 76
  Folder
Women Organizing, No.9, 1982 77
  Folder
Women Workers: Some Basic Statistics By: Lisa Vogel, 1971 78
  Folder
The Working People's Voice, Vol.1 No. 2B, 1972 79
  Folder
Working Women's Resource and Buying Guide to Greater Pittsburgh, 1982 80
  Folder
Yellow Fever, A Newsletter Written by Pittsburgh Cab Drivers, undated 81
  Folder
Young Minds Die Easy: A Case for Community Control, 1969 82

Oversize Literature, 1970-1976 

Scope and Content Notes

This specific section consists of the oversize journals, GROK and the  Pittsburgh Fair Witness, as well as the Pittsburgh and Wisconsin People's History Calendars. The materials are organized alphabetically.  GROK started publication in the 1970s, publishing nine monthly issues before the title was changed to the  Pittsburgh Fair Witness. Rabinowitz wrote for and distributed the  Pittsburgh Fair Witness. The following editorial published in 1972 provides the papers statement of purpose:

"The Fair Witness is published by a non-profit collective and is dedicated to the worldwide movement of people to control themselves—the movement to break down the authoritarian systems of government that are denying us our basic freedoms, that are responsible for needless genocidal wars, the perpetration of minority discrimination, the pollution of our environment and our bodies, the high concentration of power among the wealthy classes, exploitation of the individual, etc. The paper is dedicated to the struggle of all peoples to gain back the right to their own lives, the struggle to raise the consciousness of the world as a whole, the struggle to become independently productive through a working knowledge of the tools at our disposal. As a local paper our most important function concerns the movement here in western Pennsylvania."

Rabinowitz helped create the Pittsburgh People's History Calendar which was produced by NAM's People's History Project. Records concerning the creation of the calendar can be found in the NAM series and "projects" subseries.

  OversizeFolder
GROK Vol. 1 No. 3-9 (missing No. 7), 1970 91
  Folder
The Pittsburgh Fair Witness Vol. 1 No. 10-11, 1970 2
  Folder
The Pittsburgh Fair Witness Vol. 2 No. 1-7 (missing No.2), 1971 3
  Folder
The Pittsburgh Fair Witness Vol. 2 No. 10-14, 1971-1972 4
  Folder
The Pittsburgh Fair Witness Vol. 3 No. 2-8 (missing No. 7), 1972 5
  Folder
The Pittsburgh Fair Witness Vol. 3 No. 11-16, 1972 6
  Folder
The Pittsburgh Fair Witness Vol. 3 No. 17-20 and Vol. 4 No. 4-5, 1972-1973 7
  Folder
Pittsburgh People's History Calendar, 1975 8
  Folder
Wisconsin People's History Calendar, 1976 9

Return to Table of Contents »


Series  VI. Personal, 1961-2004 

Scope and Content Notes

This series contains materials that document Rabinowitz's experiences during college and after in New York City, non NAM and DSA affiliated conferences and events, legal cases she was involved in, writings and correspondence, various projects, and involvement in other various organizations. This series is divided into six subseries in which folders are organized alphabetically, excluding "legal cases" which is organized chronologically.

Subseries  1. College and New York City, 1961-1969 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries documents some of Rabinowitz's activism while at college and after college when she moved back to New York City. Included are writings, events, and materials collected which are organized alphabetically.

  BoxFolder
Antioch College Student Organizations, Actions, and Publications, 1961-1963 101
  Folder
Anti-Poverty Teach In, 1965-1967 2
  Folder
Committee For Independent Political Action, 1966 3
  Folder
Helsinki Youth Festival, 1962 4
  Folder
Movement for a Democratic Society, 1968-1969 5
  Folder
Movement for a Democratic Society, Literature, 1969 6
  Folder
Movement for a Democratic Society, Welfare, 1968-1969 7
  Folder
The National Committee to Abolish the House Un-American Activities Committee, 1961-1966 8
  Folder
Social Welfare Worker's Movement, 1964-1969 9
  Folder
Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), 1963-1964 10

Subseries  2. Conferences and Events, 1966-1999 

Scope and Content Notes

Rabinowitz was not only active in attending various conferences and events through NAM and DSA, but her activism and involvement extended beyond and after these organizations. This subseries documents the various conferences and events she attended and is organized alphabetically.

  Folder
Alternative State and Local Policies Conference, 1980 11
  Folder
Anti-Communism and the US: An International Conference, 1988 12
  Folder
Campus Organizing Action Conference, 1970 13
  Folder
Citizen's Action Midwest Academy Retreat, 1984 14
  Folder
Counter Bicentennial Demonstration, 1976 15
  Folder
Health Care for All Speaker's Seminar, 1992 16
  Folder
Morningside March, 1987 17
  Folder
Second Festival of the Revolution, Granada, 1981 18
  Folder
Strike City Benefit, 1966 19
  Folder
Women's Health Services 10th Anniversary Celebration, 1983 20
  Folder
Women of Achievement Recognition and Awards, 1999 21
  Folder
Various Conferences and Workshops, 1980-1984 22

Subseries  3. Legal Cases, 1964-1997 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries documents the legal cases Rabinowitz was involved in and include legal documents, briefs, and newspaper clippings. Materials are organized in chronological order. Of interest are the The Gegner v. McKee and Rabinowitz v. The United States cases. Joni Rabinowitz v. The United States, or "Joni's Case" as it was known, involved she and five other members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) who were indicted for perjury in 1963 when she testified that she was not present at a protest meeting in front of an Albany, Ga., grocery store. Her father, Victor Rabinowitz, defended her and won an appeal the next year. The Gegner v. McKee involved Rabinowitz and over one hundred Antioch College students and other civil rights activists who were arrested in 1964 after protesting against Lewis Gegner, a Yellow Springs barber who refused to serve African American patrons.

  Folder
Albany By: Howard Zinn 1962 23
  Folder
The Albany Cases (pamphlet), 1962 24
  Folder
"Joni's Case," 1963-1965 25-26
  Folder
Joni Rabinowitz v. The United States, Brief of Amicus Curiae of American Scholars, 1964 27
  Folder
Joni Rabinowitz v. The United States, Legal Briefs, 1964 28
  Folder
Joni Rabinowitz v The United States Legal Briefs, 1966 29
  BoxFolder
Gegner v. McKee Newspaper Clippings, 1964 111
  Folder
Gegner v. McKee Correspondence, 1964-1968 2
  Folder
Gegner v. McKee Legal Documents, 1964-1965 3
  Folder
Defiant Trespass, 1985 4
  Folder
Drug Bust, 1971 3
  Folder
Case Against Rabinowitz for the Distribution of Leaflets at the Monroeville Mall, 1996-1997 5

Subseries  4. Writings and Correspondence, 1964-2004 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries is organized alphabetically and contains items written by Rabinowitz, which includes correspondence, academic papers, and newspaper editorials and pieces. Also included are items written about Rabinowitz which include newspaper articles, interviews, and academic papers.

  Folder
Correspondence Regarding Breast Cancer Diagnosis, 1983 6
  Folder
Correspondence with Brother Concerning His Involvement in the Freedom Riders, 1964 7
  Folder
Correspondence with Martin Luther King Jr., 1964 8
  Folder
Letters to the Editors of Various Newspapers, 1973-1978 9
  Folder
Mastectomy Legislation, 1984 10
  Folder
Papers Written On Joni, 1989-1991 11
  Folder
Personal Correspondence, 1964-1988 12
  Folder
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Roundtable, 1984 13
  Folder
Press, 1964-2004 14
  Folder
Speeches, 1975-1980 15
  Folder
University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work, 1972-1974 16

Subseries  5. Projects, 1973-1996 

Scope and Content Notes

This subseries contains materials pertaining to projects Rabinowitz was involved in, separate from the organizations she was a member of. Included are the advertising books that she created for different causes, evaluation and analysis of local organizations, an oral history project she became involved in, and papers that document her time at Wobblie Joe's Tavern as a manager. Materials are organized alphabetically.

  Folder
Advertising Books, 1981-1982 17
  Folder
Celestial Seasonings Tea Distribution, 1973 18
  Folder
Evaluation and Analysis of Community Organizations in Pittsburgh, 1977 19
  Folder
Oral History Project, 1975-1996 20
  Folder
Resistance and Beyond: A Handbook Prepared by The Pittsburgh Resistance and Their Friends, 1970 21
  Folder
Wobbie Joe's Tavern, Manager, 1978-1981 22
  Folder
Wobblie Joe's Tavern, Personal Notebook, 1978-1981 23

Subseries  6. Personal Involvement in Organizations, 1968-1996 

Scope and Content Notes

Included in this subseries are materials that document Rabinowitz's involvement in organizations throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, separate from those related to the NAM or DSA. Materials are organized alphabetically.

  Folder
Ad Hoc Committee to Counter Klan Activity, 1980-1981 24
  Folder
The Citizen's/Consumer Party Materials, 1980 25
  Folder
Committee to Improve Kane Hospital, 1977 26
  Folder
Ejection from Democratic Platform Meeting, 1996 27
  Folder
Fair Budget Coalition, 1982 28
  Folder
The Gulf Action Project, 1970 29
  Folder
Jobs with Peace, 1981-1987 30
  Folder
Just Harvest Presentations and Testimonies, 1992-1996 31
  Folder
Heath Care for All, Post 1995 and Disbandment, 1995 32
  Folder
Health Care for All, Canadian Tour, 1992 33
  Folder
Local 1199 in Pittsburgh, 1968-1970 34
  Folder
Relations with Congress of Afrikan People, Mass Party Organizing Committee, 1975-1976 35
  Folder
Relations with Socialist Worker's Party Campaign, 1973-1976 36
  Folder
Support Our Neighborhood Action Coalition, 1983 37
  Folder
Switchboard Community Telephone Service and Serve the People Coalition, 1970-1972 38

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