Guide to the George Washington Manuscript Collection, 1754-1798 SC.2014.01

ULS Archives & Special Collections

Summary Information

Repository
ULS Archives & Special Collections
Title
George Washington Manuscript Collection
Creator
Washington, George, 1732-1799
Collection Number
SC.2014.01
Date
1754-1798
Extent
4.0 linear feet
Abstract
The George Washington Manuscript Collection is composed of seven hand-written letters of correspondence and two holographic documents written by George Washington (1732-1799), Colonel Henry Bouquet (1719-1765), and William Crawford (1732-1782). A Society of the Cincinnati certificate of membership for James Glentworth (1747-1839), a Second Lieutenant in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783), is included in the collection and is signed by Major General Henry Knox (1750-1806) and by George Washington. There is also an engraved portrait of George Washington that accompanies the collection. It is a small engraving of a large oil painting that was painted and completed by Charles Wilson Peale (1741-1827) in 1772, which portrays Washington in the uniform of a colonel of the Virginia Regiment from the French and Indian War (1754-1763). Digital reproductions are available online.

Preferred Citation

George Washington Manuscript Collection, 1754-1798, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

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Biography

George Washington (1732-1799) was an American military officer and the first president of the United States. He was born on February 22, 1732 in the North American British Colony of Virginia. His parents were the prosperous land owners Augustine Washington (1694-1743) and Mary Ball Washington (1708-1789). As a young man, George Washington was privately tutored and trained as a surveyor. His surveying experience led Robert Dinwiddie (1693-1770), the Lieutenant Governor of Colonial Virginia, to offer Washington a commission in the Virginia militia in 1753. In the spring of 1754, George Washington was appointed to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel of the Virginia Regiment and sent by Robert Dinwiddie to oppose the French advance in North America by asserting and securing British territorial claims in the Ohio Country and at the Forks of the Ohio. This expedition led to the outbreak of the French and Indian War (1754-1763), which became the North American theatre of the global conflict known as the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763). George Washington was promoted to Colonel of the Virginia Regiment in 1755, and served until 1758 when he retired his commission.

Escalating tensions over taxes levied by Great Britain on the thirteen American colonies led to the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783), which erupted in the spring of 1775 at the Battles of Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts. In June 1775, George Washington was chosen by the Second Continental Congress to serve as General and Commander-in-chief during the American War of Independence. The American Revolution ended in 1783 after Great Britain recognized the independence of the United States. George Washington resigned his commission at the end of the war and returned to civilian life. In 1787, he presided over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States. He was elected to be the first president of the United States in 1789, and served as president for two terms. George Washington retired from the presidency in 1797, and returned to private life at Mount Vernon, Virginia, where he died in 1799. In his roles as a military officer, advisor, and as president, the direct actions of George Washington helped forge the new nation of the United States and its framework and systems of American government.

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Scope and Content Notes

The George Washington Manuscript Collection contains letters and documents that are of significant historical importance regarding George Washington’s (1732-1799) involvement in many of the decisive engagements that occurred in the Ohio Valley and around the strategic location of the Forks of the Ohio in the quest for empire fought among British, French, colonial, and Native American military forces in eighteenth century North America. The collection is arranged in chronological order by date, and each of the manuscripts is accompanied by a descriptive summary in the finding aid.

The manuscript collection spans George Washington’s military and political careers and is comprised of letters of correspondence, documents, and an engraved portrait. The first three letters refer to events that occurred throughout the French and Indian War (1754-1763), when Washington was Lieutenant Colonel of the Virginia Regiment during his second expedition to the Ohio Country in 1754. The letters written by Washington concern the surrender of the first British fort built at the Forks of the Ohio in April 1754, and the battle that occurred at Jumonville Glen in May 1754. The attack at Jumonville Glen was the first hostile military encounter between the British and the French over the disputed territory of the Forks of the Ohio, which led to the outbreak of the French and Indian War. There is also a letter written by Colonel Henry Bouquet (1719-1765) to George Washington, reporting on recent developments surrounding the road building effort west to the Forks of the Ohio, a key strategy in the military expedition under the leadership of the British Brigadier General John Forbes (1707-1759) to seize Fort Duquesne from the French in 1758.

The letters written by Washington after the French and Indian War include a letter that details his recommendations regarding an upcoming surveying expedition in the Ohio Valley during the spring of 1774, foreshadowing Lord Dunmore’s War which began in the fall of 1774. George Washington’s letter written to General Edward Hand (1744-1802) describes the military situation at Fort Pitt in 1777, when Washington was Major General and Commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). As President of the United States, Washington wrote to the gentlemen of Carlisle expressing his confidence to resolve the crisis of the Whiskey Rebellion in Western Pennsylvania in 1794. There is also a letter written by Washington to his nephew Robert Lewis (1769-1829) from Mount Vernon, Virginia in 1798.

The other manuscripts in the collection are documents that include a land survey, a Society of the Cincinnati certificate of membership, and an affidavit. The survey of lands along the Ohio River was written by William Crawford (1732-1782) in 1771. It describes property that Washington received in the Ohio Valley for his services to the Colony of Virginia during the French and Indian War. The Society of the Cincinnati certificate of membership is for James Glentworth (1747-1839), a Second Lieutenant in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. It was signed and dated by Major General Henry Knox (1750-1806) and by George Washington on October 31, 1785. The final document is an affidavit that Washington wrote during his presidency in 1795, directing the disposal of his property in the County of Washington and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by the Pittsburgh attorney James Ross, Esquire (1762-1847). There is also an engraved portrait of George Washington that accompanies the collection. It is a small engraving of a large oil painting that was painted and completed by Charles Wilson Peale (1741-1827) in 1772, which portrays Washington in the uniform of a colonel of the Virginia Regiment from the French and Indian War.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

ULS Archives & Special Collections, October 2017

University of Pittsburgh Library System
Archives & Special Collections
Website: library.pitt.edu/archives-special-collections
412-648-3232 (ASC) | 412-648-8190 (Hillman)
Contact Us: www.library.pitt.edu/ask-archivist

Access Restrictions

No restrictions.

Copyright

No copyright restrictions.

Acquisition Information

The George Washington Manuscript Collection was created by the University of Pittsburgh Library System from original letters and documents that were included in the bequests of Pittsburgh philanthropists Edith Dennison Darlington Ammon (1862-1919) and Mary O’Hara Darlington (1852-1925). The Darlington sisters bequeathed the library founded by their parents, William McCullough Darlington (1815-1889) and Mary Carson O’Hara Darlington (1824-1915), to the University of Pittsburgh in 1918 and 1925. In addition, manuscript letters and documents written by and to George Washington (1732-1799) were among the gifts made to the University of Pittsburgh during the 20th century by Helen Clay Frick (1888-1984), and by an anonymous donor.

Existence and Location of Copies

Digital reproductions of the collection are available online.

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Related Materials

Related Material

Addison, Alexander, 1759-1803. Papers of Alexander Addison, 1786-1803. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:06.

Brodhead, Daniel, 1736-1809. Papers of Daniel Brodhead, 1779-1781. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:04.

Darlington Family. Autograph files of the Darlington Family, 1610-1914. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:07.

Darlington Family. Darlington Family Papers, 1753-1921. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:01.

Darlington, William M. (William McCullough), 1815-1889. Copybooks of Fort Pitt Records, 1752-1782. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:12.

Darlington, William M. (William McCullough), 1815-1889. Papers Related to William M. Darlington’s Book, Christopher Gist’s Journals, 1882-1893. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:14.

Douglass, Ephraim, 1749?-1833. Ledger Books of Ephraim Douglass, 1769-1790. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR1937:07.

Forman, Jonathan, 1755-1809. Papers of Jonathan Forman, September 21, 1794 - October 25, 1794. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1982:01.

Great Britain. Commissioners for Indian Affairs for the Province of Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh Waste Book and Papers of the Fort Pitt Trading Post, 1757-1765. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:03.

Hand, Edward, 1744-1802. Correspondence, 1777-1785. Includes twenty-six letters written by and to General Edward Hand from Fort Pitt and from other forts. Much of the correspondence is with Archibald Lochry, who was from Westmoreland County, Pa., and relates to the defense of the frontier during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

Irvine, William, 1741-1804. Copies from the papers of Brig. Gen. William Irvine : rel. to the history of S.W. Pa., etc., 1778-1785 (bulk 1781-1783). Holograph copies of selections from the books and papers of Brigadier General William Irvine, who commanded Fort Pitt (Pa.) from November 6, 1781 to September 30, 1783. Copies made by James Veech in 1859 from originals "kindly furnished ... for that purpose by his grandson, William A. Irvine, M.D., of Warren, Pa."

McNair, Dunning, 1762-1825. Papers of Dunning McNair and Dunning Robert McNair, 1793-1857. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1943:01.

Mulkearn, Lois. Research Files of Lois Mulkearn, 1937-1956. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1981:01.

Ohio Company (1747-1779). Records of the Ohio Company, 1736-1813. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:02.

Stewart, Robert, Lieutenant Colonel. Letters of Lieutenant Colonel Robert Stewart, 1754-1755. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1937:29.

Stobo, Robert, 1727-1772? Papers of Robert Stobo, 1754. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:05.

Veech, James, 1808-1879. James Veech Copybook of the Papers of General William Irvine, 1778-1822. Archives Service Center – AIS Manuscripts. DAR 1925:11.

Washington, George 1732-1799. The Journal of Major George Washington: Sent by the Hon. Robert Dinwiddie, Esq; His Majesty’s Lieutenant-Governor, and Commander in Chief of Virginia, to the Commandant of the French Forces on Ohio; to which are Added the Governor’s Letter and a Translation of the French Officer’s Answer; with a New Map of the Country as Far as the Mississippi. Williamsburgh Printed; London: Reprinted for T. Jeffreys, 1754.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • Ohio Company (1747-1779).
  • Society of the Cincinnati.

Geographic Name(s)

  • Pennsylvania -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783
  • United States -- History -- French and Indian War, 1755-1763

Personal Name(s)

  • Bouquet, Henry, 1719-1765
  • Crawford, William, 1732-1782
  • Dinwiddie, Robert, 1693-1770
  • Hamilton, James, 1710-1783
  • Hand, Edward, 1744-1802
  • Knox, Henry, 1750-1806
  • Lewis, Robert, 1769-1829
  • Preston, William, 1729-1783
  • Ross, James, 1762-1847
  • Washington, George, 1732-1799

Subject(s)

  • Indians of North America -- Ohio River Valley
  • Ohio River Valley -- History
  • Whiskey Rebellion, Pa., 1794

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Collection Inventory

  BoxFolder
Letter written by George Washington (1732-1799) to James Hamilton (1710-1783), Lieutenant Governor of Colonial Pennsylvania. [Wills Creek], [Saturday] April [27], 1754 11

In the letter written on April 27, 1754, George Washington, the Lieutenant Colonel of the Virginia Regiment, sent word to James Hamilton, the Lieutenant Governor of Colonial Pennsylvania, of the surrender of Fort Prince George, the first British fort built at the Forks of the Ohio, on April 17, 1754, by Ensign Edward Ward (c. 1726-1793) to the captain of the French forces in the Ohio Valley, Claude-Pierre Pécaudy de Contrecœur (1705-1775). Washington briefs Lieutenant Governor Hamilton on the alliance between the British and Tanacharison (c. 1700-1754), the Seneca Indian leader also known as the Half King, who expected British support and protection from the French. Washington informs Hamilton of his plan to travel as far as the mouth of Red Stone Creek, where his regiment would have access to river transport and shelter. Washington then provides Hamilton with intelligence that additional French forces, along with six hundred of their Chippewa and Ottawa Indian allies, were travelling along the Ohio and Scioto rivers to join the French at the Forks of the Ohio. The autographed manuscript letter is written on the recto and verso and signed by George Washington on watermarked paper. There is a notation in a different hand on the verso regarding George Washington and Captain William Trent (1715-1787?) with the dates, “Saturday, 27 April…Rec. 3 May.” The folder also contains photocopies of the original letter and the dealer catalogue description. SCF

Online

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  Folder
Letter written by George Washington (1732-1799) to Robert Dinwiddie (1693-1770), Lieutenant Governor of Colonial Virginia, [May 29, 1754] 2

The letter dated May 29, 1754 was written by George Washington, Lieutenant Colonel of the Virginia Regiment, to Robert Dinwiddie, the Lieutenant Governor of Colonial Virginia from 1751 to 1758. It reports on the events of May 28, 1754, when colonial militia and Indian forces led by George Washington and the Seneca Indian leader Tanacharison (c. 1700-1754), attacked and defeated the French force led by Joseph Coulon de Villiers, Sieur de Jumonville (1718–1754). The letter describes Washington’s account of the battle at Jumonville Glen on May 28, 1754. Jumonville Glen was the first hostile military encounter between the British and the French over the disputed territory of the Forks of the Ohio, which led to the outbreak of the French and Indian War (1754-1763). The French and Indian War became the North American theater of the global conflict known as the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763). The autographed manuscript letter is written on the recto and signed by George Washington on watermarked paper. The letter is addressed on the verso, “To The Hon’ble Rob. Dinwiddie Esq., Governor [of Virginia], with a second notation in a different hand with the date, “Col. Washington, 29th May, [1754].” The folder also contains photocopies of the original letter. FCK

Online

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  Folder
Letter written by Colonel Henry Bouquet (1719-1765) to George Washington (1732-1799). Camp near Reas Town, July 11, 1758 3

The letter was written by Colonel Henry Bouquet (1719-1765) to George Washington from a camp near present day Raystown, Pennsylvania. It concerns troops and provisions needed to build a road west to the Forks of the Ohio. The construction of a road through the western wilderness was a key strategy in the military expedition under the leadership of the British Brigadier General John Forbes (1707-1759) to seize Fort Duquesne from the French in 1758. Colonel Henry Bouquet was second in command during the Forbes Expedition. In the letter, Bouquet reports to Washington that Major [Andrew] Lewis had just arrived with 200 men, and that they will begin immediately to cut the road to meet Colonel [George] Mercer. Bouquet also informs Washington that he has not heard from General Forbes since the 19th of June. The autographed manuscript letter is written on the recto and signed by Colonel Henry Bouquet on watermarked paper. The letter is endorsed by George Washington on the verso, “From Colonel Bouquet, 11th July 1758.” The folder also contains photocopies of the original letter and the dealer catalogue description. SCF

Online

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  Folder
Original Survey of Lands along the Ohio River written by William Crawford (1732-1782), Soldier and Surveyor, June 1771. Accepted and endorsed by George Washington (1732-1799), November 6, 1772 4

William Crawford (1732-1782) was a military officer who served with George Washington in the Virginia Regiment throughout the French and Indian War (1754-1763) and the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). Crawford was also a land surveyor and speculator who surveyed and wrote this original survey that describes the 2,314 acres of land between the Big and Little Kanawha Rivers, tributaries of the Ohio River, which were awarded to Washington for his services to the Colony of Virginia during the French and Indian War. Washington’s acceptance and endorsement of the survey is written at the bottom of the document and on the verso, and dated, “the 6th day of Nov. 1772.” There is also a notation on the verso in a different hand that the survey was, “Lodged 13 Nov. 1772…Patented 15 Dec. 1772.” The survey is laid-in to a dark blue, gilt-stamped morocco portfolio that includes a bound-in frontispiece portrait engraving of George Washington by the painter Charles Wilson Peale (1741-1827). The engraving is dated 1772 and was published in New York by G. P. Putnam & Co. It was engraved by George Parker (active 1772), after the large portrait that was painted and completed by Peale in May 1772, in which George Washington is portrayed in the uniform of a colonel of the Virginia Regiment from the French and Indian War. The portrait is considered to be the earliest commissioned portrait of George Washington, and was painted at Mount Vernon, Virginia. The engraving faces a calligraphic title page that has the same title as the gilt-stamped portfolio. The survey is written on the recto and signed by William Crawford on watermarked paper. The folder also contains photocopies of the original survey and the dealer catalogue description. SCF

Online

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  Folder
Letter written by George Washington (1732-1799), possibly to Colonel William Preston (1729-1783). Mount Vernon. February 12, 1774 5

George Washington wrote this letter from Mount Vernon, Virginia, possibly to Colonel William Preston (1729-1783), recommending that Captain Thomas Rutherford (1729-1804) be considered as an assistant on an upcoming surveying expedition. Washington states that both he and the recipient of the letter were well acquainted with Rutherford. Washington may have recommended Thomas Rutherford to Colonel William Preston to assist with the survey of the western lands of the Kentucky country during the spring of 1774. Surveys of the Kentucky lands that spring followed the British acquisition of French lands in North America that were seized at the end of the French and Indian War (1754-1763), after the signing of the Treaty of Paris and the Royal Proclamation issued in 1763. The surveys foreshadowed the outbreak of Lord Dunmore’s War between the Colony of Virginia and the Shawnee and Mingo Indian nations in the fall of 1774. Colonel William Preston was the chief surveyor and county lieutenant for Fincastle County, Virginia, which, at that time, encompassed most of the Kentucky lands. In the spring of 1774, Preston organized and deployed surveying parties to continue surveying the Kentucky lands at the request of George Washington and other Virginia land holders. Thomas Rutherford was a military officer from Berkeley County, Virginia, who defended the frontier during and following the French and Indian War. He later represented the Virginia House of Burgesses as an agent to resolve financial matters related to the military campaign brought against the Shawnee Indians by John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore (1732-1809), Governor of Virginia, in 1774. The autographed manuscript letter is written on the recto and signed by George Washington on watermarked paper. The notation on the verso of the letter states, “Col. Washington’s Letter abt.…Rutherford.” The folder also contains photocopies of the original letter. DAR

Online

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  Folder
Letter signed by George Washington (1732-1799) to General Edward Hand (1744-1802). Head Quarters, October 13, 1777 6

This letter is signed by George Washington and was sent to General Edward Hand (1744-1802) from Washington’s headquarters north of British–occupied Philadelphia during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The letter conveys Washington’s grasp of the military situation at Fort Pitt in October 1777, which was threatened by attack from Native American as well as British Loyalists forces. Washington acknowledges receiving an earlier report from General Hand, which provided Washington with intelligence on the state of the garrison at Fort Pitt. This letter conveys Washington’s disappointment at the cold attitude expressed by the local population in furnishing assistance in case of an attack on Fort Pitt. Edward Hand was Brigadier General and Commander of Fort Pitt, and was later appointed Adjutant General to George Washington in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. The manuscript letter is written on the recto and verso, and signed by George Washington on watermarked paper. The folder also contains photocopies of the original letter and the dealer catalogue description. SCF

Online

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  Folder
The Society of the Cincinnati Engraved Certificate of Membership for James Glentworth (1747-1839). Signed by Major General Henry Knox (1750-1806) and George Washington (1732-1799), October 31, 1785 7

The Society of the Cincinnati is a military organization that was established in 1783 by officers in the Continental Army who fought in the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The idea for the organization originated with Major General Henry Knox (1750-1806) before the war’s end as a way to preserve the fraternity and the ideals of the officers that fought together in the American Revolution. The Society acted as a benevolent organization for members in need, and advocated for just compensation from the United States Congress for military services rendered by its members during the American Revolution. Membership in the organization was originally open to officers that served at least three years in the Continental Army or Navy, as well as to officers in the French Army or Navy who fought in the American War of Independence. Knox named the Society after the Roman military and political figure Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus (520 BC – 430 BC), who successfully defended Rome against military threats, and who, immediately afterwards, resigned the dictatorship and the absolute powers granted to him in times of crisis to return to civilian life. The member officers of the Society of the Cincinnati nominated and elected George Washington (1732-1799) to serve as their first President General, which he did until his death in 1799. In addition, certain original members of the Society of the Cincinnati were founders of the cities of Cincinnati, Ohio and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

James Glentworth (1747-1839) was a Second Lieutenant in the American Revolutionary War, serving from 1777-1783. He fought in the New Jersey Campaigns and the Battles of Brandywine and Germantown, and also served with George Washington at Valley Forge. He retired from active service in June 1783, and after the war worked as the Collector of the Port of Philadelphia, a position that he may have held until the spring of 1829. James Glentworth became a member of the Society of the Cincinnati on October 31, 1785, and was active in the State Society of the Cincinnati of Pennsylvania as Assistant Secretary from 1789 to 1792, then as Assistant Treasurer from 1818 to 1828. The Society of the Cincinnati engraved certificate of membership for James Glentworth measures 36 cm x 52.5 cm and is signed on the illustrated recto by The Society’s secretary Major General Henry Knox, and by the President General George Washington. It is inscribed on the verso by James Glentworth with the date of March 5, 1790, along with the signature of the former owner, William M. Darlington (1815-1889). The certificate was designed by Aug. L. Belle (active 1785), and engraved on vellum from a copper plate by J. J. Le Veau (active 1785). The folder also contains photocopies of the original membership certificate. DAR

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  Folder
Letter signed by George Washington (1732-1799) to the Gentlemen of Carlisle, [October 6, 1794] 8

This letter was written to the gentlemen of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, possibly by Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804), Secretary of the Treasury, and signed by George Washington during his presidency. In the letter, Washington acknowledges imposing governmental restrictions, but endorses his course of action in the Whiskey Insurrection in the western counties of Pennsylvania in the 1790s, also known as the Whiskey Rebellion. He is certain that conditions in Pennsylvania will improve when order is restored. The letter reflects Washington’s confidence as president to enforce the federal powers of the new U.S. government to resolve the Whiskey Rebellion, the events of which came to a head in July and August 1794. The revolt protesting the excise tax on whiskey by farmers on Pennsylvania’s western frontier fell apart when Washington ordered the federal militia to Western Pennsylvania in October 1794. Washington entered Carlisle with federal troops on October 4, 1794 and remained there a few days. He assigned General Henry Lee (1756-1818) and Alexander Hamilton the task of leading the 12,950-man army to Western Pennsylvania, arriving by the end of October 1794. The manuscript letter is signed by George Washington and written in three pages on two leaves of watermarked paper. There are also notations on the verso of the second leaf in different hands, one of which reads, “G. Washington’s reply.” The folder also contains photocopies and transcriptions of the original letter, along with an example of Alexander Hamilton’s handwriting. DAR

Online

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  Folder
Power of Attorney Affidavit written by George Washington (1732-1799), appointing James Ross, Esquire (1762-1847) of Pittsburgh as his attorney. Philadelphia, August 29, 1795 9

George Washington appointed James Ross, Esquire (1762-1847) of Pittsburgh as his attorney to sell property that Washington had titles to in the County of Washington and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in this affidavit written by Washington during his presidency. James Ross was a respected lawyer in Pittsburgh, who served as a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania from 1794 to 1803. He was one of three Pennsylvania commissioners appointed by President George Washington to negotiate an end to the Whiskey Rebellion conflict in 1794. The autographed affidavit is written on the recto and signed by George Washington. The letter bears the personal watermark of George Washington. The folder also contains photocopies of the original affidavit. DAR

Online

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  Folder
Letter written by George Washington (1732-1799) to his nephew Robert Lewis (1769-1829). Mount Vernon, June 4, 1798 10

George Washington reflects on tenant leases, the weather and the seasons, and the state of the animals and the crops in this letter written from Mount Vernon, Virginia, during his retirement to his nephew Robert Lewis (1769-1829) of Spring Hill, Fauquier County, Virginia. The letter is signed by Washington, “Affect. Uncle G. Washington.” Washington addressed and signed the letter on the verso to, “Mr. Rob’t Lewis, Spring Hill, Fauquier Cty. …G. Washington.” There is also an ink notation on the verso in a different hand, “From Genl. Washington, 4th June 1798.” The autographed manuscript letter is written on the recto and the verso and signed by George Washington. The letter bears the personal watermark of George Washington. The folder also contains photocopies of the original letter. DAR

Online

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