Guide to the Brashear Association Records, 1891-1978 AIS.1979.17

ULS Archives & Special Collections

Summary Information

Repository
ULS Archives & Special Collections
Title
Brashear Association Records
Creator
Brashear Association.
Collection Number
AIS.1979.17
Date
1891-1978
Extent
6.25 linear feet (5 boxes)
Abstract
The Brashear Association was founded in 1916, largely through the efforts of Mrs. John Phillips who led the Mother's Club of Carrick in launching a campaign to raise funds for a settlement organization as a monument to the work of her friend, John Brashear. The Association opened formally on April 27, 1917 and was officially chartered April 18, 1920. John and Phoebe Brashear's Holt St. home and workshop were converted to a community center. In addition to recreational activities and skill-building classes for children and adults, the settlement offered Americanization classes for foreigners through its Citizenship Center. The material, spanning the years 1891-1978, falls into three distinct groups: records and publications of the Brashear Association, papers of and pertaining to John Alfred Brashear, the individual in whose memory the Brashear Association was founded, and papers relating to the South Side's history and social conditions.

Preferred Citation

Brashear Association Records, 1891-1978, AIS.1979.17, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System

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Biography

John Alfred Brashear was born in Brownsville, Pennsylvania, on November 24, 1840, the son of Brown Brashear, a saddler and Julia Smith Brashear, a school teacher. The oldest of seven children, John Brashear attended school in Brownsville through the age of 15 and did not receive further formal education.

Brashear held short-term jobs in Brownsville followed by a three year apprenticeship in mechanics in pattern shops. During this time Brashear also studied to obtain a license as a local Methodist preacher. A subsequent job with the Louisville, Kentucky City Waterworks was interrupted by the Civil War.

Returning to Pennsylvania in 1861, Brashear found employment as a mechanic in a rolling-mill in Pittsburgh.While serving as choirmaster in Pittsburgh's Walton Church, he met Phoebe Stewart, also working at the church, and they were married September 24, 1862.

After his marriage, Brashear pursued his interest in astronomy after work hours, his maternal grandfather, Nathaniel Smith, had encouraged this hobby. At the age of 32, Brashear built his own astronomy workshop next to his house at 3 Holt Street For three years he spent his spare time grinding and polishing, with homemade tools, a telescope lens which was dropped and broken shortly after being completed. A replacement lens was made and Brashear's five-inch refracting telescope was completed in 1876. He contacted Samuel Pierpont Langley, Director of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory, and donated the telescope to the observatory.

Brashear's next project, following a visit to the telescope exhibit at the Centennial Exhibit in Philadelphia, was a 12-inch reflecting telescope.

Although the silvering methods Brashear developed at this time became the industry's standard procedure, he never patented this or any of his inventions or techniques; all were freely shared with other scientists and manufacturers.

Brashear's health was not good, his own projects, drawings, and equipment commissioned by others, in addition to full-time work at the mill, proved too much of a strain for him. Relief came in 1881, when financial support from William Thaw, a friend of Langley's, enabled Brashear to devote all of his time to producing telescope apparatus and designing other scientific instruments, including some for Langley's experiments with time systems and aerodynamics. In 1886, Brashear left his South Side home and moved to Perrysville Ave., where Thaw provided him with a large workshop in an area with air clean enough for studying the stars.

Two years later, Brashear made the first of three trips to Europe, this one financed by Thaw and Henry Phipps. The second trip, in 1892, was a lecture tour underwritten by Andrew Carnegie and Phipps.

In 1894, Brashear became Chairman of the Allegheny Observatory Committee of the Western University of Pennsylvania (now the University of Pittsburgh). He served as Acting Director of the Observatory from 1898-1900. During this time, he was in charge of raising funds and obtaining a site for a new observatory.

In 1896, Brashear became a member of the Board of Trustees of Western University of Pennsylvania. From 1901-1904, he served as Acting Chancellor of the University. Brashear's third trip to Europe, in 1911, was made as the University's delegate to the 500th anniversary of Saint Andrew's University in Scotland.

In 1909, when Henry Clay Frick founded a Commission for the continuing education of public elementary school teachers, he wished to remain anonymous and designated Brashear director of the fund, later to become the Frick Educational Commission. A group of teachers who had benefitted from the study and travel grants provided by the fund formed the Phoebe Brashear Club in 1912, for the purpose of doing settlement work including classes for immigrants.

That same year included the dedication of the new three-tower Allegheny Observatory, housing Brashear's 13-inch refractor telescope along with the Thaw Memorial Telescope and the Keeler Memorial Telescope, both built with equipment from the Brashear Company. In 1915 Brashear was elected President of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, appointed by the Department of State a U.S. delegate to the Pan-American Scientific Congress, and named Pennsylvania's "most distinguished citizen" by Governor Brumbaugh. That year Brashear was present for Alexander Graham Bell's famous trans-continental conversation, and was honored with "Brashear Day" at the Panama Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. Brashear's last few birthdays were recognized by special civic functions. At his 75th, the Western University of Pennsylvania awarded him the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, one of half a dozen honorary degrees he received during his lifetime from various institutions. The next year, after a spectacular birthday celebration, Brashear left on a voyage to the Orient, as the guest of Ambrose Swasey travelling to the dedication of a science building he had donated to Nanking University.

After this trip, Brashear's health deteriorated until his death in 1920. The abundant literature in praise of "Uncle John" attests his status as a Pittsburgh legend even before his death. Coming from a poor family, motivated to educate himself, he symbolized perseverance, self-improvement, and dedication to making and sharing scientific discoveries. The founders of the Brashear Association saw the charitable organization as a monument to these qualities.

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History

The Brashear Association was founded in 1916, largely through the efforts of Harriet Duff Phillips (Mrs. John Phillips) who led the Mother's Club of Carrick in launching a campaign to raise funds for a settlement organization as a monument to the work of her friend, John Brashear. The Association opened formally on April 27, 1917 and was officially chartered April 18, 1920. John and Phoebe Brashear's Holt Street home and workshop were converted into a community center. In addition to recreational activities and skill-building classes for children and adults, the settlement offered Americanization classes for foreigners through its Citizenship Center.

The Brashear Association expanded from its original Holt Street location with the acquisition of additional property and buildings donated by prominent Pittsburghers. Joseph G. Trees donated a farm near Zelienople, Pa. for the Claudia Virginia Trees Camp, in memory of his wife. Here the Brashear Association operated a summer camp for settlement families. Former County Commissioner Joseph Armstrong donated his house to the Association, opening in 1936. Two years later, the Martha C. Hoyt House was opened. In 1941, the George Washington Carver House was dedicated by the Association became the location for settlement activities for African Americans.

For the most part, segregation was in effect until the new Brashear Center was built in 1956 at 2005 Sarah Street which centralized the functions of the previously separate locations. Three years later, in an adjacent building, the Brashear Museum and Astronomy-Science Center was completed. The Museum had been operating since its formal dedication in 1940, on the occasion of Brashear's 100th birthday anniversary celebration . The Henry Kaufmann Center at 2201 Salisbury St was completed and dedicated in 1964.

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Scope and Content Notes

The material in the collection fall into three distinct groups: records and publications of the Brashear Association; papers of and pertaining to John Alfred Brashear, the individual in whose memory the Brashear Association was founded; and papers relating to the South Side's history and social conditions.

The records and publications of the Brashear Association range from 1890-1978, with the bulk of the material falling between 1915 and 1965. The collection contains executive correspondence, grant proposals, conference reports, extensive scrapbooks, press releases, canceled checks, notices of activities and meetings, brochures, newspaper clippings, building blueprints and equipment specifications, invoices, and photographs. In addition to the records which relate to the Association as a whole, separate folders represent the activities of various individuals or divisions of the Association: the Phoebe Brashear Club, the Brashear Museum and Astronomy-Science Workshop, individual settlement houses, and the Claudia Virginia Trees Camp. With the last two institions named, a large number of photographs document activities and quarters. Many of the photographs bear conflicting dates, or no dates at all and very few identify the individuals pictured.

The papers of and relating to John Brashear span the years 1891 to 1977. Included are incoming and outgoing correspondence, photographs of Brashear and his wife, birthday memorabilia, and a small amount of correspondence pertaining to genealogical queries about the Brashear family. A large proportion of the collection consists of a variety of published and unpublished biographical items and tributes to Brashear: pamphlets, articles in periodicals, books (including Brashear's autobiography), radio and play scripts, newspaper clippings, poems, etc. Other material relating to Brashear held by the Archives Service Center are the Records of the Allegheny Observatory, of which Brashear served as Director Pro Tem from 1898-1900. These records (AIS.1964.22) include "public, private, administrative, and scientific correspondence of former directors" and both incoming and outgoing letters of Brashear's are included. Correspondence of Brashear's friend and scientific colleague, Samuel Langley, Director of the Allegheny Observatory from 1867 to 1887, may also be of interest to the researcher.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

ULS Archives & Special Collections, 1979

University of Pittsburgh Library System
Archives & Special Collections
Website: library.pitt.edu/archives-special-collections
412-648-3232 (ASC) | 412-648-8190 (Hillman)
Contact Us: www.library.pitt.edu/ask-archivist

Revision Description

 Description of oversize material added to the finding aid. December 2010

Access Restrictions

No restrictions.

Copyright

Permission for publication is given on behalf of the University of Pittsburgh as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.

Acquisition Information

This collection was donated in 1979.

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Archives Service Center Staff in 1979.

Revision and rearrangement for the encoded version of the finding aid provided by Holly Mengel in December 2001. Information about the collection title and the controlled access terms was extracted from the MARC record in the University of Pittsburgh catalog Voyager ID number: 1436618

Existence and Location of Copies

This collection is also available on microfilm in the Archives Service Center (Microfim-cabinet 2, Drawer 8)

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • Brashear Association.

Genre(s)

  • Personal papers

Geographic Name(s)

  • South Side (Pittsburgh, Pa.) -- History
  • South Side (Pittsburgh, Pa.) -- Social conditions

Personal Name(s)

  • Brashear, John A. (John Alfred), 1840-1920

Subject(s)

  • Associations
  • Astronomers -- United States -- Biography
  • Engineers -- United States -- Biography
  • Ethnic groups
  • Social service -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh

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Previous Citation

Brashear Association Records, 1891-1978, AIS.1979.17, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

Brashear Association, Pittsburgh, Pa., Records, 1891-1978, AIS 79:17, Archives of Industrial Society, University of Pittsburgh Libraries

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Collection Inventory

Series  I. Board of Directors Minutes 1928-1971 

  BoxFolder
 January 1928 - June 1931 11
  Folder
 August 1931 - May 1932 2
  Folder
 June 1932 - December 1932 3
  Folder
 January 1933 - July 1933 4
  Folder
 September 1933 - December 1934 5
  Folder
 January 1935 - May 1936 6
  Folder
 May 1936 - December 1937 7
  Folder
 January 1938 - April 1939 8
  Folder
 May 1939 - May 1940 9
  Folder
 May 1940 - December 1940 10
  Folder
 January 1941 - May 1941 11
  Folder
 June 1941 - October, 1943 12
  Folder
 November 1943 - November 1944 13
  Folder
 December 1945 - July 1947 14
  Folder
 July 1947 - May 1948 15
  Folder
 May 1948 - April 1950 16
  Folder
 April 1950 - November 1950 17
  Folder
 January 1956 - November 1956 18
  Folder
 January 1957 - March 1958 19
  Folder
 April 1958 - August 1960 20
  Folder
 October 1960 - December 1961 21
  Folder
 January 1962 - November 1962 22
  Folder
 January 1963 - November 1963 23
  Folder
 July 1964 - August 1964 24
  Folder
 September 1964 - November 1965 25
  Folder
 January 1966 - January 1967 26
  Folder
 February 1967 - May 1968 27
  Folder
 November 1968 - December 1971 28

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Series  II. Records of the Officers of the Brashear Association 1918-1958 

Scope and Content Notes

Series II contains information on the Officers of the Brashear Association. Harriet Duff Phillips (Mrs. John Phillips)was the founder and chairman of Brashear Association from 1882-1958. This series contains both business correspondence and personal papers. The former includes exchanges between HDP and officers of Pittsburgh city government such as Charles Schwab, John Phillips,Elizabeth Stewart, and others. Personal papers include correspondence and memorabilia, including a poem written by HDP for John Brashear on his 77th birthday in 1917. Additional items pertain to Mrs, Phillips' death (Board of Directors resolution in her memory, newspaper clipping, etc.) and Phillips Mine and Supply Company equipment.

Elizabeth Ritchie was the Director of Brashear Association. Her records consist of business-related correspondence including exchanges between Elizabeth Ritchie and the Foreign Language Information Service (regarding immigrant education) and letters regarding the Brashear Mother Training Program and Red Cross Activities. Her records also contain periodicals and clippings, with files relating to museum administration, history of settlement houses, "Famous People" and miscellaneous topics.

  BoxFolder
Records of Harriet Duff Phillips (Mrs. John Phillips) 1916-1958 229-31
  Folder
Records of Elizabeth Ritchie 1921-1926 32

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Series  III. General Files and Correspondence 

Scope and Content Notes

Series III is comprised of loose material which is arranged chronologically. It includes assorted documents and a bound notebook which is not chronologically arranged. The series includes some of the first checks written for the Brashear Memorial Fund in 1917 and a memoranda concerning Brashear Association's relationships with other community organizations such as Kingsley House and the South Side Community Council. Also included is the Assessment of Services in 1961, including detailed financial information, a file copy of a grant proposal to the Henry Kaufmann Foundation of New York City for the replacement of the John A. Brashear House ca. 1962. There is correspondence relating to the paperback edition and movie rights to Gaul and Eiseman's biography of Brashear, personal policies and practices in 1964, philosophy, aims, and objectives of the Association in 1965, the Board Manual for the Association, with history and objectives; and miscellaneous records reflecting history of the Association as a whole.

  Folder
 1917-1978 33-37

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Series  IV. Daily Operational Journals 

  Folder
 1917-1927 38-43

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Series  V. Budgets 

  Folder
 1917-1927 44-52

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Series  VI. Scrapbooks 1915-1961 

Scope and Content Notes

Series VI consists of nine scrapbooks which are arranged chronologically. Some of the books overlap in time span. The nine bound scrapbooks contain newspaper clippings, copies of mimeographed announcements of Association activities, brochures and memorabilia (tickets, membership cards, special event programs, etc.). Material within each scrapbook is arranged more or less chronologically. There is a fair amount of duplication of material among scrapbooks, and between the scrapbooks, the journals (Series IV)and some of the unbound records. Some photographs are also included. The scrapbooks bear labels of varying accuracy with regard to actual contents. The actual content follows. The first scrapbook lists names and addresses.

The second scrapbook includes articles on Brashear's death; the John Phillips "scandal" (non-reappointment to Pennsylvania Case Board because of refusal to take Prohibition Pledge). It also contains a great deal of material not directly related to the Association. The name inside the cover is "Mrs. Elizabeth Ritchie, Brashear Settlement."

In the third scrapbook, only a handful of items bear pre-1929 dates.

Scrapbook four reflects wartime concerns and several items in this volume relate to the Association's Citizenship Center for the Americanization of aliens.

Virtually all items in the eighth scrapbook fall between March 1954 and January 1959. This book includes coverage of the fund drive for the new Sarah Street Settlement House and of the death of Mrs. Harriet Phillips.

Due to size limitations, these scrapbooks have been housed out of order. Volumes 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 8 have been boxed together. Because Volumes 2, 4 and 9 were slightly oversized, they have been boxed separately in Box 3A.

  BoxVolume
 July 1915 - April 1920 31
  Volume
 1917-1938 3
  Volume
 January 1946 - October 1951 5
  Volume
 September 1949 - May 1955 6
  Volume
 October 1951 - May 1955 7
  Volume
 March 1954 - May 1955 8
  BoxVolume
 August 1923 - November1924 3A2
  Volume
 1939-1945 4
  Volume
 May 1955 - April 1961 9

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Series  VII. Publications of the Brashear Association 1940-1977 

Scope and Content Notes

Series VII contains Annual Reports from 1940-1977. This range is not continuous. The years that are represented are 1940, 1943-44, 1953, 1955-62, 1964-66 and 1976-77. The Annual Meeting programs available are 1948, 1950, 1955-56, and 1977. The Study of the South Side in Folder 56 was prepared in cooperation with the South Side Development Council and contains statistics on housing, land use, employment, churches, school, health and social service, etc. Folder 57 contains Brashear Association public relations brochures and a mimeographed newsletter.

  BoxFolder
Annual Reports, (not continuous) 1940-1977 453
  Folder
Annual Meeting Programs, 1948-1977 54
  Folder
Telescope "Official Organ of the Brashear Association, Inc." December, 1925, May 22, 1942 55
  Folder
Study of the South Side: Wards 16 and 17, Pittsburgh, PA, 1962 56
  Folder
Miscellaneous publications, 1954-1959 57

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Series  VIII. Activities and Individual Settlement Houses Records 1916-1973 

Scope and Content Notes

Series VIII is arranged in alphabetical order by name of house. Within each house, files are separated from photographs and the contents are arranged chronologically. The amount of material varies widely from house to house. Program reports, annual reports, staff meeting minutes, dedication programs, financial records (in no case very extensive), memeographed announcement, newspaper clippings, and photographs are typical.

The records of the Armstrong House (Folders 58-60) contain biographical material on Joseph Armstrong, including campaign literature and notices of house activities. The Brashear House records in Folder 61, contain photographs of model home improvement project, World War II Victory Gardens and general living conditions on the South Side. The records of the Carver House in Folder 62 contain official reports of conferences with Mrs. Phillips, Reverend Hardy and Mrs. Helen Jackson. It also contains the Quarterly Analysis (19), and a notice of the meeting "Against Jim Crowism" held on July 18, 1938. In Folders 63-64, the records of the Hoyt House #1 consist of a dedication, posters, programs, clippings and photographs (prints and negatives). The Records of Hoyt House #2 are held in Folder 64 and contain Records of the Advisory Committee. The Kaufmann House Records, (Folders 65-69) contain plans for the building, lists of the Board of Directors of the Association from 1962-63, specifications, orders, invoices, and correspondence pertaining to construction and equipment. These records also contain news clippings concerning the ground-breaking and Meals on Wheels programs. In these same folders, sales agreements, specifications, blueprints, invoices, and inspection forms concerning the construction and equipment of the New Brashear Association Community Building are available. Folder 70 contains a script, possibly radio, announcing Buhl Planetarium's Regional Convention of Astronomers and Stargazer's Fair in May, 1940, a proposal to E.J. Kaufmann Charitable Foundation to build a Museum and Astronomy Workshop in 1957, and a draft of a proposal to the Buhl Foundation to provide equipment and furnishings for the Museum and workshop. It also contains a Progress Report from 1964 to the Pittsburgh Foundation for a $95,000 grant for a scientific demonstration project in the workshop and newspaper clippings concerning the museum. The records of the Claudia Virginia Trees Camp, held in Folder 71, consist of sample brochures, a dedication program for Susanne Beatty Pool from 1940 and news clippings. The Phoebe Brashear Club records in Folder 72 consist of the Constitution and By-laws which were adopted February 15, 1912, a Yearbook from 1940 that includes a list of past achievements and previous presidents of the Phoebe Brashear Club, a program for the Annual Dinner Meeting in May 1942, a program and the publicity materials for the Annual Dinner Meeting on May 15, 1956 which was dedicated to Martha C. Hoyt, and a brochure for the Phoebe Brashear Tearoom.

  Folder
Armstrong (Joseph) House, 919 Carson Street, 1936-1953 58-60
  Folder
Brashear House (original settlement), 19 Holt Street, 1916-1919 61
  Folder
Carver (George Washington)House, 2910 and 3429 Carson Street, 1936-1944 62
  Folder
Hoyt (Martha C.) House, #1, 2849 Sarah Street, 1938-1951 63-64
  Folder
Hoyt House #2,713 Ormsby Ave., 1950-1951 64
  Folder
Kaufmann (Henry) House, 2201 Salisbury, 1962-65 65-69
  Folder
New Brashear Association Community Building, 1954-1973 65-69
  Folder
Brashear Museum and Astronomy-Science Workshop, 1900-1973 70
  Folder
Claudia Virginia Trees Camp, Zelienople, PA 1932-1966 71
  Folder
Pheobe Brashear Club 1912-1956 72

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Series  IX. Papers of John Alfred Brashear, 1840-1920 1891-1919 

Scope and Content Notes

Series IX contains information on John Alfred Brashear. Folder 73 consists primarily of correspondence which is arranged chronologically. There are approximately 15 autographed or typed items signed by John Brashear which are addressed to Charles Schwab, Harriet Phillips, Mary Meighan and others. Included are incoming letters from Charles Schwab, E. E. Bernard of Yerkes Observatory, C. R. Dooley, William Thaw, and others. The series includes a three-page letter in Braille (with transcription) from children at the Western Pennsylvania Institute for the Blind. This last and several of the above items relate to Brashear's forthcoming trip to the Orient which occurred in November, 1916. A unique item is Zeno Lodge #748's Resolution in Memorial for Basil Brown Brashear, J. A. Brashear's grandfather on Feb. 3, 1891. The manuscript is in very poor condition. Folder 74 contains a copy of E.K. Adams' Sunshine Calendar which is incribed "A gift to Helen C. Frick from her friend John A. Brashear, 1910."

Folder 75 contains Birthday Memorabilia and most of the material pertains to the 100th anniversary celebration in 1940. Included is a printed pamphlet by R. O. Hughes, newpaper and magazine articles, speeches, programs, and poems in honor of the occasion. Some material from other anniversary celebrations since Brashear's death, as well as from his birthday celebrations during his life-time.

Folder 76 contains genealogical material in the form of correspondence and notes. Most of this material pertains to relatives of John Brashear. Persons named include Mrs. Emmett Cary and Mrs. E. J. Paulson of Pittsburgh, John A. Brashear of Mount Vernon, New York, Julia Dangerfield Glass of New Orleans, and Cecele Gruet of Brooklyn, New York.

Folder 77 consists of unpublished biographical materials which include drafts of lectures, dittoed scripts of dramatizations, several typed biographical summaries in both outline and narrative form. Most items are unsigned and undated. Included are two lectures by James O'Brien, Executive Director of the Brashear Association which were presented for Pittsburgh's South Side Rotary Club in 1974 and for the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation's Famous Pittsburghers Bicentennial Lecture Series in 1977. Folder 79 contains an article which "gave the inspiration for the founding of the Brashear settlement." In Folder 80 the printed issue of the article by Ann M. Kendlehart is included as is a typed manuscript of the article. The Pennsylvanian, which contains an article by Helen Fendrick, was published by the Pennsylvania Historical Junto in Washington, DC.

Subseries  1. General 

  BoxFolder
Papers 1891-1919 573-74
  Folder
Birthday Memorabilia 1917-1953 75
  Folder
Genealogical Material 1951-1978 76
  Folder
Unpublished Biographical Materials 1916-1977 77

Subseries  2. Radio Broadcasts 

  Folder
Broadcasts, 1971 78

Includes:"Adventures in Research: Beloved Lens Maker" in Modern Americans in Science and Invention Series.

"Path to the Stars" in the Cavalcade of America Series, presented by the DuPont Company on NBC, June 5, 1971.

Subseries  3. Pamphlets and Articles 

  FolderItem
"Uncle John Brashear" in American Magazine by Merle Crowell, 1916 791
  Item
"Get Interested in Something: Have a Hobby--Studying the Stars is Mine" in American Magazine by John Brashear, 1916 2
  FolderItem
"The Story of John Alfred Brashear: The Man Who Loved the Stars" by the Brashear Association, November 1959 801
  Item
"The Man Who Loved the Stars" in Carnegie Magazine by Ann M. Kendlehart, November 1959 2
  Item
"John Alfred Brashear" in The Pennsylvanian, Volume 18, by Helen Fendrick, March-December 1963 3

Subseries  4. Books 

  Folder
Brashear, John. The Autobiography of a Man Who Loved the Stars. New York, American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 262 p. Indexed. 1924 81
  Folder
Gaul, Harriet and Ruby Eiseman. Scientist, Humanitarian, 1840-1920. University of Pennsylvania Press, 220 p. Indexed 1940 82

Subseries  5. Newspaper Clippings 

  Folder
Newspaper Clippings, 1916-1977 83

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Series  X. South Side Historical Materials 

Scope and Content Notes

Folder 84 contains the study entitled South Side Ethic Groups which resulted from the Conference on Racial and Industrial Development of the South Side. This conference took place in October, 1928 and the 1929 study contains information on the English, Irish, Polish, Welsh, Ukrainian, Czechoslovakian, Lithuanian, and African American communities in the South Side. Folder 85 contains a typed manuscript of a sketch of the South Side which includes maps and clippings. There is a signature on the flyleaf: "Frank Skalak." and the cover states: "This is the only copy available." Folder 91 contains two issues of  Closer Look, a publication by the Birmingham Union for the Restoration of Pittsburgh's South Side. The June-August, 1977 issue (Volume 2, No.3) contains an article on glassmaking in the South Side. The April, 1977 issue is Volume 2, No.2. In Folder 96, the miscellaneous clippings and short mss. concern South Side history and primarily the anniversary of the [Civil] "War Scar" from June 14, 1863 and the McKinley Fort on the South Side. The miscellaneous items in Folder 97 consist of programs, posters, and ticket stubs.

  Folder
South Side Ethnic Groups from the Conference on Racial and Industrial Development of the South Side in October, 1928, 1929 84
  Folder
A Brief Sketch of the South Side compiled by the Pupils of the Eleventh Grade 1937 85
  Folder
Our South Side by Bert Gold (Field Instructor, School of Applied Social Sciences, University of Pittsburgh)(2 copies) 1923 1942 86
  Folder
The Georgetown of Pittsburgh, Speech to South Pittsburgh Development Council by Calvin S. Hamilton (Executive Director, Pittsburgh Department of City Planning May 27, 1963 87
  Folder
Allegheny County Profile (Draft) August 1, 1977 88
  Folder
South Side Survey Synopsis Report 89
  Folder
History of Pittsburgh South of the Point, Prior to 1925. 90
  Folder
History of the South Side 91
  Folder
Closer Look published by Birmingham Union for the Restoration of Pittsburgh's South Side, June-August 1977 April, 1977 92
  Folder
ASI Nationality Fact Sheet and Newsletter, 1947, 1956 93
  Folder
Map: South Side Housing Study by the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh (2 xerox copies) 94
  Folder
Birmingham, 1763-1976 Bicentennial Booklet by Robert K. Hayden 95
  Folder
Miscellaneous clippings and short mss. 96
  Folder
Miscellaneous items from South High School and other South Side institutions 97
  Folder
Needs Assessment of the South Side: study for the Brashear Association, Pittsburgh 1984 98
  Folder
Letterpress Copy Book related to Business of the Brashear Association November 18, 1908 - April 20, 1909 99
  Folder
Inventory of Brashear Museum 100

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Series  XI. Oversize Material 

Scope and Content Notes

This material was added to the finding aid in December 2010.

  Map-caseDrawer
 1. Picture, “Seventh Conference, National Federation of Settlements-Lillian House, Kingsley Association,” 1917 74
 2. Text of room dedication to Martha C. Hoyt 
 3. Paper with pre-litho positioning 
 4. Metal Litho with picture of Martha C. Hoyt’s house 
 5. Sheet with Pan-American and unidentified dinner pictures 
 6. Picture, “George Washington Carver House,” 1940 
 7. Last known picture of Dr. John Brashear, 1920 
 8. Painting of John A. Brashear, by A. Benziger 
 9. Pictures of John A. Brashear, 1919 
 10. Picture of John A. Brashear, 1919 
 11. Titled “Folder 3”, with newsclippings, 1940 
 12. Titled “Folder 2” with various newsclippings, 1940 
 13. Titled “Folder 1” with various newsclippings, 1940 
 14. Bag labeled, “John A. Brashear papers” VERY FRAGILE 
 15. Biography of Martha C. Hoyt 
 16. Magazine titled, “The Index”, article titled, “Brashear Chats with China’s President”, 1917 
 17. Newspaper titled, “Pittsburgh Bulletin” 
 18. Various newspaper articles 
 19. Scripts of radio broadcasts on John Brashear’s life 
 20. Picture, “Closing Session, Pan-American Scientific Conference, Washington D.C.”, 1916 
 21. Picture, “Second Pan-American Conference, Washington D.C.”, 1915 
 22. Picture of unknown dinner, 1907 

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