search terms in context | full text File Size: 980 K bytes | Add this to my bookbag

Subseries 2. World War II

Scope and Content Notes:

Within this subseries, the images are arranged alphabetically by book title. Under each title the photographs are separated into published and unpublished images. The published images are arranged exactly as they appear in the books and are followed by the unpublished images. In addition to images considered for the pictorial, the D-Day photographs contain images gathered for the ABC documentary “D-Day: A Soldier’s Story.” A large portion of the unpublished photographs are filed under The Way It Was, simply because it was one of the last Pearl Harbor-related books written or edited by Goldstein that included photographs. All the photographs not directly tied to a specific book are located under the category “miscellaneous unpublished images,” which is arranged by topic. Researchers wishing to view images of the daily activities of soldiers serving in the European theater should consult the photographs from the Curran and Finkel scrapbooks. The Finkel photographs also include aerial shots of Paris, Normandy, and the Rhine that were taken during bombing expeditions.

Section: D-Day Normandy: The Story and the Photographs


Box Photo 7
Folder 1-12 Published Images, 1942 - 1964
1. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the American declaration of war in December 1941.

His Arm band denotes mourning for his mother, who had died that autumn. Note Sam Rayburn's signature on the declaration.

  • Page number:
  • Photo number: 1-1
2. King George VI, in admiral's uniform, makes an inspection tour of the heavy cruiser, USS Augusta (CA-31) at Portland, England, just after 1400 on 25 May 1944.

Note camouflage paint on barrels of Augusta's main battery.

  • Page number:
  • Photo number: 1-2
3. Winston S. Churchill, prime minister of Great Britain (center, front row), attends a conference with President Roosevelt.

Adm. Ernest J. King is at far left in the front row, and Adm. Lord Louis Mountbatten stands between Churchill and FDR.

  • Page number: 1
  • Photo number: 1-3
4. General Dwight D. Eisenhower, commander, Supreme Allied Command, Allied Expeditionary Force.

This photo was taken in 1945 after Ike received his fifth star.

  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-4
5. Gen. Sir Bernard Montgomery commander in chief of land forces, Allied Expeditionary Force, and commander in chief, 21st Army Group.

The 2nd British Army & 1st Canadian Army were also under his command. This photo shows Monty sitting in an M-5 Grant tank in North Africa.

  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-5
6. Lt. Gen. Omar Bradley, commander, American Ground Forces (left), meets Gen. George Marshall, chief of staff, U.S. Army (center), and Gen. Henry Arnold, commander, USAAF (right), on 12 June 1944 in Normandy.
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-6
7. Maj. Gen. Leonard Gerow, commanding general, U.S. V Corps (center), sits with Maj. Gen. Clarence Huebner, commander, 1st Infantry Div. (left), and with the commander of his shore party, Brig. Gen. W. Hoge (right).

Photo taken 5 June 1944, aboard the USS Ancon (AGC-4).

  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-7
8. Maj. Gen. J. Lawton Collins, commanding general, VII Corps.
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-8
9. Maj. Gen. Raymond O. Barton addresses troops of the 22nd Infantry Regiment in July 1944 following the fall of Cherbourg.
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-9
10. Maj. Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway, commanding general, 82nd Airborne Div. (left), confers with his assistant, Brig. Gen. James Gavin.

This photo, showing Gavin as a major general, was taken on 20 January 1945, near the close of the Ardennes campaign.

  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-10
11. Maj. Gen. Maxwell Taylor, commanding general, 101st Airborne Division.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-11
12. Brig. Gen. Anthony McAuliffe, assistant commander, 101st Airborne Division.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-12
13. Lt. Gen. George Patton, commanding general, U.S. 3rd Army, standing in a Dodge 3/4-ton command vehicle as he confers with one of his officers in Sicily, 1943.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-13
14. Adm. Sir Bertram Ramsay, RN, commander in chief, naval forces, Allied Expeditionary Forces (left), strolls with Rear Adm. John Hall, commander, Task Force 124.

Taken aboard Ancon, 24 May 1944.

  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-14
15. Rear Adm. Alan Kirk, commander, Task Force 122, WeRear Adm. Alan Kirk, commander, Task Force 122, Western Naval Force, watching the Normandy landing from his flagship, Augusta.stern Naval Force, watching the Normandy landing from his flagship, Augusta.
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-15
16. Rear Adm. Donald Moon, commander, Task Force 125.

Photo taken at Algiers on 24 March 1944.

  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-16
17. Rear Adm. Morton Deyo, commander, Task Force "U" Bombardment Group (right), with Kirk (center), and Ike (left), 19 May 1944, on board Tuscaloosa.
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-17
18. Rear Adm. John Hall, commander, Task Force 124, shown on his flagship, Ancon, in the English Channel, June 1944.
  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 1-18
19. Rear Adm. Carlton Bryant, commander, Force "O" Bombardment Group.

This photo was taken in December 1950.

  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 1-19
20. Commodore Campbell Edgar, commander, Task Force 126.

In this photo he is a captain in command of the transport USS William P. Biddle (APA-15) about 1941.

  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 1-20
21. General Henry H. "Hap" Arnold, commander, U.S. Army Air Force.
  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 1-21
22. General Eisenhower (left) inspects a 9th Air Force fighter base in march 1944, accompanied by Maj. Gen. Lewis Bereton, commanding general, 9th Air Force (right), and Brig. Gen. Elwood Quesada, chief, 9th Fighter Command (center).
  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 1-22
23. British Air Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory, commander in chief, Allied Expeditionary Air Forces.
  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 1-23
24. Adolph Hitler, chancellor of the German Reich (right), rides with Italian dictator Benito Mussolini (left) during their heyday.
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-24
25. Generalfeldmarschall Wilhelm Keitel, chief of OKW (left), chats with Reichsfuhrer-SS Heinrich Himmler (right), probably before the war.
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-25
26. General der Artillerie Alfred Jodl, chief of staff of the German Army.

Hitler retained titular command.

  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-26
27. Generalfeldmarschall Gerd von Rundstedt, commander in chief in the West.

This photo was taken following his capture in 1945.

  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-27
28. Generalfeldmarschall Gunther von Kluge, successor to Rundstedt as OB West.

He is shown here with Hitler during the 1935 Fall Maneuvers.

  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-28
29. Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel, commander, Army Group B in Normandy.
  • Page number: 12
  • Photo number: 1-29
30. Generaloberst Heinz Guderian, inspector general of Panzers.
  • Page number: 12
  • Photo number: 1-30
31. Generaloberst Friedrich Dollman, commanding general, 7th Army.

Note on the right breast of Dollman’s tunic the thread loops used to secure decorations and ribbon bars.

  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 1-31
32. Obergruppenfuhrer Paul Hausser, successor to Dollman as commander, 7th Army, following Normandy.
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 1-32
33. General der Artillerie Erich Marcks (left), commander of the 7th Army’s 84th Corps, with lay within the Normandy sector.
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 1-33
34. Reichmarschall Hermann Goring, chief of OKL.
  • Page number: 14
  • Photo number: 1-34
35. Gen. Adolph Galland, commander, German Fighter Command.
  • Page number: 14
  • Photo number: 1-35
36. Grossadmiral Karl Donitz, admiral of the fleet, Kreigsmarine (German Navy) and KM (Naval High Command).
  • Page number: 14
  • Photo number: 1-36
37. Adm. Theodor Krancke, chief of the Naval Group West (right) speaks with Luftwaffe Gen. Johannes Jeschonneck.
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 1-37
38. Generalleutnant Gunther Blumentritt, OB West chief of staff to von Rundstedt.
  • Page number: 16
  • Photo number: 2-1
39. A German reinforced concrete observation post at Cherbourg.

Note the camouflage paint scheme.

  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-2
40. A tired German unteroffizier, or sergeant, comes on board battleship USS Texas on 7 June 1944.
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-3
41. Two polish prisoners, likely Volksdeutsche, being interrogated on 15 June 1944.
  • Page number: 18
  • Photo number: 2-4
42. Ten glum Mongolian Freiwilligen stand under guard on board a U.S. warship in the aftermath of the Normandy invasion.
  • Page number: 18
  • Photo number: 2-5
43. American infantry round up civilian laborers and German and Italian soldiers on Omaha Beach during 6 June 1944.

A wounded American at right stands on guard.

  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-6
44. A 153-mm field gun the Germans captured from the Russians and transported to the Normandy front.
  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-7
45. Generalleutnant Fritz Bayerlein (right), commander, Panzer Lehr Division, reports to General Cruewell during the heyday of the Afrika Korps.
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-8
46. A German infantry private (note the white piping on the shoulder straps) demonstrates one of his prior occupations for his American captors on 15 June 1944.
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-9
47. Karl-Wilhelm von Schlieben, commander, 709th Infantry Division.

Shown here as an oberst early in the war.

  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-10
48. Comparison of 1943 and 1944 German infantry divisions.
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-11
49. Comparative firepower of U.S. and German infantry division in 1944.
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-12
50. Positions of German divisions in Normandy and vicinity on 6 June 1944.
  • Page number: 22
  • Photo number: 2-13
51. Generalmajor Wilhelm Falley, commander, 91st Infantry Division (right center), confers with General der Artillerie Erich Marcks of the 84th Corps.
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-14
52. Oberst Baron Friedrich-August Freiherr von der Heydte, commander, 6th Fallschirmjager Regiment.

Shown here as a major, listening to a radio in his command car.

  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-15
53. Generalleutnant Dietrich Kraiss, commander, 352nd Infantry Division.

Kraiss wears a WWI-era Iron Cross 1st Class, with a "W" for Kaiser "Wilhelm" rather than a swastika in the center.

  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-16
54. The approach to Omaha Beach as seen from the PT boat that carried Adm. Harold Stark ashore on an inspection tour of the Allied beachhead on 14 June 1944.
  • Page number: 24
  • Photo number: 2-17
55. View from a German 75 mm PAK43 gun position in a Normandy pillbox.

PAK stands for Panzerabwehrkanone (antitank gun).

  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 2-18
56. Cliffs of Normandy at high tide and beach obstacles in the surf.
  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 2-19
57. View of an invasion beach.
  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 2-20
58. Le bocage – the hedgerows of Normandy.
  • Page number: 26-27
  • Photo number: 2-21
59. Railway car full of mines abandoned by the Germans at Cherbourg.

This photo was taken on 3 July 1944.

  • Page number: 26
  • Photo number: 2-22
60. German Teller mines affixed to posts and planted in the surf west of Omaha near Pointe du Hoc.
  • Page number: 26-27
  • Photo number: 2-23
61. Teller mine attached to a pole fashioned from a tree trunk on Utah Beach.
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-24
62. A 75mm L24 gun turret from a Mark IIIN Panzer in place on Omaha Beach provides evidence of the effort to recycle outdated armored equipment.
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-25
63. German machine-gun position at La Grande Vey between Utah and Omaha beaches.
  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 2-26
64. German pillbox in use as an Army command post after the invasion.

Note American equipment.

  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 2-27
65. An incomplete German 105mm gun emplacement of reinforced concrete construction, two mile inland from Fort St.-Marcouf, north of Utah Beach.
  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 2-28
66. A 50mm gun emplacement on the beach at la Grande Vey between Utah and Omaha beaches.
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 2-29
67. Leaving hurriedly, the Germans failed to remove this minefield sign.
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 2-30
68. Teller mines and other antipersonnel weapons lie on the beach at Normandy, after being "tamed" by Allied sappers.
  • Page number: 30
  • Photo number: 2-31
69. The business end of a German bomb hangs suspended from a cliff overlooking Omaha Beach.

The precise location is not known, but likely it was Point du Hoc, where the 2nd Ranger Battalion landed.

  • Page number: 30
  • Photo number: 2-32
70. German flamethrower near Fort de Foucarville, inland from Utah Beach.
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 2-33
71. German remote-control "Beetle" miniature tank photographed shortly after the initial landings.

Note the socks drying in the background.

  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 2-34
72. Berman 88mm Flak42 gun.

This example was photographed in Sicily, 7 August 1943.

  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 2-35
73. German tank, or panzer, PzKpfw (Panzerkampfwagen) IV Aus H with 75mm L48 gun.

This example taken near Sezze, Italy, on 29 May 1944.

  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 2-36
74. German Kettenkraftrad, or tracked motorcycle, captured in Normandy.

This photo was taken on 14 June 1944 near Isibny. An American soldier sits astride while other soldiers repair the unit for their own transportation.

  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 2-37
75. German MG-42 machine gun.
  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 2-38
76. Czech Brno light machine gun, captured and put to use by the Germans.
  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 2-39
77. American troops in England examine two captured German weapons – a Walther P-38 9mm pistol and an Mp-40 machine pistol.
  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 2-40
78. Captured German rifles, bazooka, and range finder.
  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 2-41
79. German Panzerfauste (armored fists) – crude, one-shot bazookas, rigged for demolition toward the end of the war.

Note stencil reading "Vorsicht! Starker Feuerstrahl!" ("Caution! Strong flame jet!")

  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 2-42
80. Battleship Nevada (BB-36) in 1944.
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 2-43
81. Battleship Texas (BB-35) on 1 April 1944.
  • Page number: 36
  • Photo number: 2-44
82. Destroyer Thompson (DD-627) seen from Arkansas during preparations fro Normandy, late May 1944.
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 2-46
83. AN LCM makes fast alongside LCI(L)-95 off Utah Beach, 12 June 1944.
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 2-47
84. LCF-22 stands offshore during the invasion rehearsals at Slapton Sands, off the coast of Great Britain.
  • Page number: 38
  • Photo number: 2-48
85. AN LCM, PA13-2, stands ready to take a jeep onboard from a Coast Guard-manned transport during June 1944.
  • Page number: 38
  • Photo number: 2-49
86. LCT-520 releasing its load of trucks on 11 June 1944.

Note how shallow the water is – barely up to the thighs of the crews near the vessel.

  • Page number: 39
  • Photo number: 2-50
87. British LCT-2008, operating under the American flag, approaches the invasion beaches on 7 June 1944.
  • Page number: 39
  • Photo number: 2-51
88. British LCT(R)-48 turns away from the Normandy beaches after delivering its rockets.
  • Page number: 40
  • Photo number: 2-52
89. An LCVP, PA30-31, pulls away form its mother ship during pre-invasion loading operations.
  • Page number: 40
  • Photo number: 2-53
90. LST-325 and LST-388 unload at low tide during the resupply operations on 12 June 1944.

Note the barrage balloons, single 40mm AA guns, and "Danforth"-style Kedge anchor.

  • Page number: 40
  • Photo number: 2-54
91. The Army DUKW "Jesse James" trudges through the surf to land its load of supplies on 11 June 1944.
  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 2-55
92. Two U.S. coast Guard 83-foot patrol boats operate as rescue craft off the Normandy beaches.
  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 2-56
93. A Rhino ferry is linked with LST-322 and takes on a full cargo of invasion vehicles during pre-invasion exercises off the English coast.
  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 2-57
94. A Rhino ferry loaded with personnel and vehicles and a barrage balloon flies overhead.
  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 2-58
95. Republic P-47 Thunderbolt.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 2-59
96. North American P-51 Mustang, the nemesis of the Luftwaffe day fighter pilot.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 2-60
97. Martin B-26 Marauder.
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 2-61
98. Douglas A-20 Havoc.
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 2-62
99. B-17F Flying Fortress.

This example is the F variant, already being superseded in large numbers by the G model.

  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 2-63
100. Douglas C-47.
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 2-64
101. Army White M-3 half-rack rolls onto causeway from the ramp of an LCT.

The causeway is composed of Rhine barges. Note the gas can below and in front of the windshield. Navy personnel, identified by circular bands around the bottom of their helmets, direct the activity.

  • Page number: 46
  • Photo number: 2-65
102. An M-4A2 Sherman tank from a French unit rolls out of an LST onto the sands of Utah Beach.
  • Page number: 46
  • Photo number: 2-66
103. The American M-4 Sherman "Hurricane" with wading kit rolls onto Utah beach during 6 June.

The tank crews fully expected to have to come onto the beached in several feet of water, hence they modified the air intakes with breather hoods to prevent water from being pulled into the engine, This particular vehicle has a strange mixture of U.S./British markings.

  • Page number: 46
  • Photo number: 2-67
104. Army jeep "Dam Yankee" is towed ashore after floundering in the surf on 12 June.

Note the black driver and the censored vehicle unit data on the front bumper. Just like the tanks, this vehicle is also fitted with an amphibious breathing tube.

  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 2-68
105. An Army M-7 Priest self-propelled, 106mm howitzer, "Big Chief," From Battery B, 42nd Field Artillery, waits to go onboard an LCT at Dartmouth, England, on 1 June 1944.

Breather hoods are just visible in the rear, and a sign on its front says that the vehicle is supposed to load onto LCT-234. The sign in the background, "Simonds, Ales, Wines, and Spirits," suggests that this building might be perhaps a haunt of American servicemen

  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 2-69
106. Hedgerow "plow" affixed to the front of an M-5A1 Stuart light tank.
  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 2-70
107. Equipment carried by a parachutist rifleman.
  • Page number: 48
  • Photo number: 2-71
108. Parachutist equipment for a rifle grenadier.
  • Page number: 48
  • Photo number: 2-72
109. Emergency parachute rations.
  • Page number: 49
  • Photo number: 2-73
110. Rear Adm. Wilkes (left) and Capt. Chauncey Camp (right) watch a dawn landing exercise at Woolacombe, England, on 31 October 1943.
  • Page number: 50
  • Photo number: 3-1
111. Landing craft swing out form shore, en route to Woolacombe form landing rehearsals during 31 October 1943.
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 3-2
112. Crewmen in slickers and life vests bail frantically to clear water from a broached LCVP during the Woolacombe exercises.
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 3-3
113. Troops splash through the surf at Woolacombe as they disembark from an LCVP.
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 3-4
114. An Army staff sergeant and captain – both quite wet – watch impassively as the Woolacombe landings unfold.

The captain totes an M-1 carbine, and the sergeant wears an inflatable life belt – standard equipment in the landing craft.

  • Page number: 52
  • Photo number: 3-5
115. An American soldier reads a signboard erected at Slapton Sands on 29 December 1943 during the evacuation.
  • Page number: 52
  • Photo number: 3-6
116. Street scene in Slapton Sands during the civilian evacuation.
  • Page number: 52
  • Photo number: 3-7
117. A young English girl during the evacuation.
  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 3-8
118. The broad beached near Slapton Sands.

Note the grassy slopes similar to those encountered in Normandy.

  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 3-9
119. LST-322 disgorges a portion of its cargo into a Rhino ferry off Slapton Sands.
  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 3-10
120. Convoy of LCTs plies the waters off Slapton Beach, 10 January 1944.
  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 3-11
121. Black soldiers roll off a Rhino ferry and land their jeep.

The technician 5th grade at center is apparently attached directly to the 1st Army.

  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 3-12
122. Landing practice 17 Mach 1944.
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 3-13
123. LCI-323 at left appears to be dead in the water, while the covey of LCVPs approaches the strand.
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 3-14
124. An L-4 Piper observation plane passes overhead after the LCVPs maker their dash for the beach.
  • Page number: 56
  • Photo number: 3-15
125. The landing takes place.
  • Page number: 56
  • Photo number: 3-16
126. An infantryman’s-eye view of the beach obstructions at Slapton Beach.
  • Page number: 56
  • Photo number: 3-17
127. Two member s of a Navy communications unit scan the horizon out to sea for messages from the ship approaching the shore.
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 3-18
128. (Left to right) Lt. Gen. Bradley, Rear Adm. Hall, Maj. Gen. Gerow, and Maj. Gen. Huebner consult while observing the invasion rehearsals off the English coast.
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 3-19
129. Destroyer Thompson (DD-627) refuels from Arkansas during pre-invasion exercises on 21 April 1944.

Note the wire, or "hawser," at right securing Thompson to the battleship’s port beam and refueling line at center.

  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 3-20
130. LST-289, its stern blown away by a torpedo launched in a German E-boat attack on 28 April 1944, lies at Dartmouth, England.

An LCM is alongside.

  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 3-21
131. LST-289’s badly damaged stern.

Note the ship’s steel-hulled LCVP’s and the cockeyed, single 40 mm mount.

  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 3-22
132. Battleships Texas (right) and Nevada lie at anchor in Belfast Lough.
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 3-23
133. General Eisenhower addresses crew members on the afterdeck of Texas.
  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 3-24
134. Ike and Kirk tour Quincy at Belfast Lough.
  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 3-25
135. Anesthetist HAIc Jesse Taylor (left) concentrates on the "patient" while Capt. A. Weiland (right), with the assistance of Lt. Joseph Barbella, prepares a plaster bandage for the patient’s right forearm. PhM2c. Edward Schork looks on.
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 3-26
136. Members of the Army’s 82nd Airborne Division display their skills in a demonstration jump.
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 3-27
137. Dignitaries including Churchill and Eisenhower watch a practice parachute drop in England on 23 March 1944.
  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 3-28
138. Members of the 101st Airborne assemble a gun dropped during training exercises in Berkshire, England.
  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 3-29
139. Bombs plummet to earth from a 9th Air Force medium bomber during the railroad and bridge busting campaign.
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 3-30
140. Bomb detonations temporarily obscure the bridge somewhere in northern France.
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 3-31
141. 9th Air Force bombers attack yet another bride in northern France.
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 3-32
142. Smoldering remains of an additional critical bridge.
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 3-33
143. Lt. Gen. Patton inspects the engine of a P-51 at the 354th Fighter Group in the British Isles.

At far right is the group commander, Col. George Bickell.

  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 3-34
144. 9th Air Force reconnaissance photo shows beach obstructions near Cherbourg one month prior to the invasion.

Note the Germans standing and, in some cases, running among the obstacles.

  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 3-35
145. Normandy, 0140, 6 June 1944.
  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 3-36
146. Road intersection in northern France, early morning, 6 June 1944.
  • Page number: 65
  • Photo number: 3-37
147. Quartermaster Depot G-22 at Moreton-on-Lugg, Hertfordshire, England.
  • Page number: 65
  • Photo number: 3-38
148. General Depot G-23 at Histon, England.
  • Page number: 65
  • Photo number: 3-39
149. Lt. Col. D. MacArdle admires the handiwork displayed on the back of Sea 1c Edwin parker’s jacket during the loading operations just prior to D-Day.
  • Page number: 66
  • Photo number: 4-1
150. Lt. Comdr. Dwight Shepler sketches an LST in the background.
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-2
151. Correspondent George Hicks records interviews with men onboard an LST before the Normandy invasion.

Note the electronics gear in the foreground.

  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-3
152. Men of Force B (Backup Force) line up on the docks in Plymouth, England, to commence loading operations on 1 or 2 June 1944.
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-4
153. Two Force "B" LCVPs in Plymouth come alongside a larger ship to transfer their men on board.
  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 4-5
154. Assault Force "O," lying at Portland Harbor, England, readies itself on 2 June 1944 for the voyage to Omaha Beach.
  • Page number: 68-69
  • Photo number: 4-6
155. Members of the 116th Infantry Regiment, 1st Battalion, depart from the beach in a fully laden LCVP, bound for USS Thomas Jefferson (APA-30).

Note inflatable life belt on soldier at right.

  • Page number: 68-69
  • Photo number: 4-7
156. Troops transfer from an LCVP to LCI(L)-539.

Rations are piled on the LCI’s deck.

  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 4-8
157. Soldiers board an LCI(L).

Note the AA mount.

  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 4-9
158. Trucks destined for Omaha Beach back into LST-51 at Portland Harbor, England, on 2 June 1944.

The truck backing in is a British Bedford with American wheels.

  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 4-10
159. View from LST-51 as it backs away from its mooring at Portland Harbor on 2 June 1944.

LST-75 is in the background at left, with a barrage balloon flying above it.

  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 4-11
160. Laden with troops bound for Utah Beach, an LCVP approaches a nest of LCIs belonging to Task Unit 125.5.3.
  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 4-12
161. An Army captain guides vehicles assigned the Force "U" on board LCT-821 at Dartmouth, England, on 1 June 1944.

Note M-7 Priest self-propelled howitzers among the cargo.

  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 4-13
162. An Army Field Kitchen Unit rolls onboard LST-506. Note cartoon painted on the side of the kitchen unit.

Just to the left rear of the kitchen, a sailor named "Dick" looks on.

  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 4-14
163. Utah Beach-bound M-16 gun motor carriage boards LST-47 at Dartmouth, England, on 1 June 1944.

Note famed "quad-.50s" mount in half-track at left and the nickname "Der Fuehrer’s Express."

  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 4-15
164. View of loading from hold of LST-47.

"Der Fuehrer’s Express" backs in.

  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 4-16
165. Lying in the River Dart, LST-47 (no doubt with "Der Fuehrer’s Express" safely tucked away on board).
  • Page number: 72-73
  • Photo number: 4-17
166. Chaplain Meyer holds Jewish services on board Ancon, flagship of Force "O" in early June 1944.
  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 4-18
167. Catholic Chaplain Deery conducts Mass on Ancon.
  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 4-19
168. Protestant services in progress on Ancon on 3 June 1944.

Seated in the front row, Generals Gerow and Huebner seek reassurance from Navy Chaplain R. McConnell. Note V Corps patch on shoulder of man at right.

  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 4-20
169. Catholic service on a Coast Guard-manned LCI.
  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 4-21
170. Dorthea L. Dix (APA-67) of Assault Force "O-3," Comdr. William Leahy commanding, lies at anchor on 5 June, following the postponement of 4 June 1944.

Embarking a portion of the 16th Infantry Regiment of the 1st Division, this unit would be the first in Omaha, on Beaches Fox Green and Easy Red.

  • Page number: 76
  • Photo number: 4-22
171. An LCVP plies its way toward a transport on 5 June 1944 off the coast of England.
  • Page number: 76
  • Photo number: 4-23
172. Army Chaplain Edward Waters holds services on a pier.

Note profusion of inflatable life belts and the soldier "Jersey" wit a -drawing of a jeep on the back of his jacket in the foreground.

  • Page number: 77
  • Photo number: 4-24
173. An Anglican priest pronounces a benediction upon the crew of HMCS Algonquin on 5 June 1944.

A destroyer in Force "J" of the Eastern Task Force, Algonquin was destined for the Canadian Juno Beach landings in Normandy.

  • Page number: 77
  • Photo number: 4-25
174. On 5 June 1944, Coast Guard Coxswain Don Brewer finds time to send home one last letter before the invasion.

Note pictures of wife or sweetheart and the pipe tobacco on the shelf behind him and the pinup on the wall.

  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 4-26
175. Shortly before embarking on C-47 transports, members of Col. Leroy Lindquist’s 508th Parachute Infantry, 82nd Airborne Division, receive V-Mail blanks in order to send one last letter to wives, sweethearts, or the folks at home.
  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 4-27
176. Other members of the 508th check equipment at their temporary airfield at Saltby, England.
  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 4-28
177. Eisenhower talks to troops of the 101st Airborne Division shortly before their departure.

Purpose of the "23" sign on the man at right is a mystery.

  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 4-29
178. Members of the 101st Airborne Division, with camouflage on their helmets and face darkened, read one last letter from home.
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 4-30
179. Lt. Gen. Brereton, commanding general, 9th Air Force, bids farewell to members of the 101st Airborne.

Note the very roughly and, likely, hurriedly painted invasion stripes on the fuselage of the C-47 in the background.

  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 4-31
180. Soldier at left in the previous picture manages a smile for the camera.
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 4-32
181. Medical evacuation teams prepare to load up for Normandy on the evening of 5 June 1944.

Note Their Red Cross armbands and aircraft invasion stripes.

  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 4-33
182. Army troops on board a Force "U" LCT stand ready for the ride across the English Channel to Utah Beach.
  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 4-34
183. A Coast Guard-manned LST departs from England on the voyage to Normandy.
  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 4-35
184. A convoy of LCIs sails across the English Channel toward Normandy on D-Day.

A barrage balloon protects each LCI from low-flying aircraft.

  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 4-36
185. Heavily laden Rhine ferry RHF-3 makes the final leg of the journey toward the invasion beaches, while a Coast Guard rescue boat is in the distance.

The name "Hell’s Angels" appears on the barge at right.

  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 4-37
186. Arkansas bombards the French coastline in support of the landings at Omaha Beach.

Note the immense cloud of black smoke from the battleship’s main battery of twelve 12-inch guns.

  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 5-1
187. Bombardment in the vicinity of Pointe du Hoc, as seen from the battleship Texas.

Note the church steeple and the buildings high atop the bluffs. This village is likely St. Pierre-du-Mont.

  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 5-2
188. Farther down the coast, an American destroyer passes between Texas and the coast line.
  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 5-3
189. Destroyer USS Harding (DD-625) stands guard over landing craft making their runs onto Omaha Beach.

Note the destroyer’s main battery turned to port and the explosion in the center if the picture. Smoke rising behind the coastline lends further evidence of the bombardment.

  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 5-4
190. Georges Leygues or Montcalm provides gunfire support for the invading troops.

A Gleaves-class destroyer in the background at left.

  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 5-5
191. The troops go in.

Landing aircraft lumber past Augusta, flagship of the Western Naval Task Force. That Augusta’s main battery is not turned shoreward was likely not a consolation to the men in the landing craft.

  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 5-6
192. With heavy smoke on shore drifting to the east, LCC-449 and LCg-424, British vessels under the U.S. flag, lend support to the landing operations on Omaha Beach.
  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 5-7
193. Two landing aircraft, LCI-490 and LCI-496, prepare to make the last dash to the beach.

Note heavy smoke on shore.

  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 5-8
194. LCVPs crowded with infantry from Assault Force "O-1" press toward Beaches Fox Red and Easy Green.

The LCVP at far left is from the transport Samuel Chase (APA-26)/ Note the large waves the landing aircraft churned up and the ubiquitous smoke on the beach.

  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 5-9
195. An LCVP from Samuel Chase charges ahead despite the explosion of a hand grenade on board after a German machine-gun bullet finds its mark.
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 5-10
196. The view from inside and LCVP heading toward Omaha Beach.

The men’s attention seems to be directed at something happening off the craft’s port side.

  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-11
197. American soldiers of the 1st Infantry Division reopen the Western Front against Hitler’s Wehrmacht.
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-12
198. Somewhat later in the morning, troops disembark fro LCI-553 onto Omaha Beach.
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-13
199. A portion of Assault Force "O-1" splashes ashore from landing craft onto Easy Red or Fox Green.

LCVP at left is from the Samuel Chase.

  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 5-14
200. Troops disembark from LCU-412 via ladders on either side of bow during the afternoon of 6 June 1944.
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 5-15
201. Soldiers wade ashore from another LCVP.
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 5-16
202. LCI-538 unloads the Force "B" reinforcements, who started landing at about 1630 onto Omaha Beach.

Obstructions in the surf can be seen behind the troops.

  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 5-17
203. Force "B" troops in their wet uniforms plod ashore burdened with weapons and equipment.

One of the soldiers directly in front of LCI-538 carried an M1A1 rocket launcher with flash detector attached.

  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 5-18
204. The soldier carrying the rocket launcher has just passed to the left, as another man wearing an inflatable life belt trudges toward the camera.
  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 5-19
205. Another platoon splashes through the surf during late afternoon of D-Day.

The soldier at left has another M-1A1 rocket launcher.

  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 5-20
206. LST-21 unloads British trucks and tanks including a Sherman nicknamed "Virgin" at left.

Note that the Royal Navy sailor on the barge at left wears same type of horizontal band on his helmet as do U.S. navy personnel.

  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 5-21
207. Part of Assault Group "O-3," 16th Infantry regiment, 3rd Battalion, assembles on a narrow strip on the gravelly beach at Fox Green, Omaha.

This photo was taken near Colleville-ser-Mer.

  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 5-22
208. A 3rd Battalion man, cold, wet, and exhausted, huddles under a blanket on Fox Green.

(An Army photographer named Hall took this and the next four poignant photos.)

  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 5-23
209. Third Battalion casualties await evacuation to England.
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 5-24
210. Five soldiers from the 1st Division, 16th Infantry Regiment, 3rd battalion.

Who would not go home.

  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 5-25
211. An American medical officer bandages the hand of a soldier near Colleville-sur-Mer, Omaha Beach.
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 5-26
212. An obergefreiter (corporal) from Gen. Kraiss’s 352nd Division has his hand bandaged by an American captain.

The white piping on the German’s shoulder straps denotes infantry.

  • Page number: 91
  • Photo number: 5-27
213. American equipment litters Omaha Beach on the afternoon of 6 June 1944.
  • Page number: 91
  • Photo number: 5-28
214. American assault troops set up a command and information post beside a silent enemy pillbox.

Note the fragmentation damage next to the exterior of the pillbox.

  • Page number: 91
  • Photo number: 5-29
215. Just out of the surf, a wounded soldier from Force "B" receives a plasma transfusion.
  • Page number: 92
  • Photo number: 5-30
216. Crossed rifles lie beside an American who perished on Omaha Beach in the 6 June 1944 assault.

Note the obstruction on the beach and the life belt around the soldier, who had taken shrapnel in his right leg.

  • Page number: 92
  • Photo number: 5-31
217. The scene on either Fox Green or Easy Red, Omaha Beach, in the aftermath of the 6 June assault.

Bodies and a large pile of inflatable life belts are at upper right.

  • Page number: 92
  • Photo number: 5-32
218. A landing craft unloads supplies (possibly from the BB Texas) for the Ranger battalions on Point du Hoc.
  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 5-33
219. U.S. Army Rangers scale the rough terrain of Pointe du Hoc.

An extension ladder is visible on the face of the cliff.

  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 5-34
220. Rangers show off the line and ladders used to scale the heights on Pointe du Hoc.
  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 5-35
221. With his shoulder patch proudly proclaiming his status as a Ranger, the soldier at right reloads a clip for his M-1 carbine.
  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 5-36
222. Lt. Comdr. John Knapper of the battleship Texas and a companion examine a German pillbox on Point du Hoc on 6 June, possibly during efforts of that ship to resupply the Rangers.

Knapper had served aboard Texas since joining it as an ensign in 1939. Note the belted German ammunition at left and a dead Ranger covered up at right.

  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 5-37
223. Nevada (BB-36) bombards Utah Beach with its 14-inch guns in support of the 7th Corps landings.
  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 5-38
224. Nevada’s forward guns belch smoke and flame during the bombardment.

Note the camouflage paint on the gun barrels.

  • Page number: 95
  • Photo number: 5-39
225. During the morning of 6 June 1944, a shell from the German counter battery fire on Utah Beach explodes on St.-Marcouf Island.

This and the next view were photographed from the heavy cruiser Quincy (CA-71).

  • Page number: 95
  • Photo number: 5-40
226. Minesweepers working to clear shipping channels explode mines in the waters across Cardonnet Bank.
  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 5-41
227. Gleaves-class destroyer throws 5-inch shells into the beach fortifications at Normandy.
  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 5-42
228. Expended 5-inch/.38 caliber cartridge cases litter the deck of USS Hobson (DD-464).
  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 5-43
229. Force "U" is under way.

Bayfield lowers its LCVPs into the water. Nevada just to the left of Bayfield.

  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-44
230. Lt. Abe Condiotti, U.S. Naval Reserve (USNR), credited with commanding the first boat to hit Utah Beach about 0630 on 6 June 1944.
  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-45
231. American soldiers with full equipment leap into the surf and wade toward Utah Beach near Les Dunes de Madeleine.

This particular load includes a number of medics. The horizontal lozenge on the back of the helmet denotes an NCO so that the men could recognize their leaders from the rear. Handles of a stretcher protrude into the photo at left.

  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-46
232. The camera looks up just as the NCOs in the previous picture exit the landing craft.

A number of vehicles have already landed.

  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-47
233. Viewed form a landing craft, a weapons carrier charges ashore at Utah Beach.

Note the machine gun on the weapons carrier and the other vehicles on the beach.

  • Page number: 98
  • Photo number: 5-48
234. Members of the American landing party assist survivors of a sunken landing craft.

One of the survivors at center with an inflatable life belt helps pull to shore a comrade, who looks somewhat the worse for the wear and may be wounded. An NCO and a beach landing-party member assist another survivor (left); one soldier (left center) refuses to put down his M-1 rife; and a third survivor (right) trudges ashore wearily on his own power.

  • Page number: 98
  • Photo number: 5-49
235. First aid being administered to soldiers on Utah Beach.

The survivors have collapsed on the beach and are covered with blankets. The soldier still clutching his M-1 now stands off at left. Note LCM-29 unloading in the background.

  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 5-50
236. Men of the 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Division, move out over the seawall at Utah Beach.

Men rest or take cover behind the wall, where most have stored their equipment.

  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 5-51
237. A German soldier with his hobnailed boots and a coverall over his uniform lies dead beside a pillbox near Les Dunes de Madeleine.
  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 5-52
238. Men of the 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Division, occupy a French village just off Utah Beach.

The lead man is still wearing his inflatable life belt.

  • Page number: 100
  • Photo number: 5-53
239. Other men of the 4th Division (probably 3rd Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment) occupy a farmyard near Les Dune de Varreville, two miles northwest of Utah Beach, after clearing German snipers from the buildings.
  • Page number: 100
  • Photo number: 5-54
240. The troopers shown above take a breather in the milk house of the same farm after clearing out snipers.
  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 5-55
241. A heavy weapons unit of the 358th Infantry Regiment, 90th Division, pauses during its advance inland from Red Beach.

The 90th Division patch on the sergeant in the foreground has been censored out. Note the German minefield sign at right. A mortar man heads the column of the left-hand side of the road. The man standing in the road behind the sergeant is part of the beach landing party, as designated by the semicircle painted on his helmet. This is a rare photo of this division on 6 June 1944. This regiment and the 343rd Field Artillery battalion were the only contingents of the 90th Division to land on 6 June 1944. The rest followed on 7-8 June 1944.

  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 5-56
242. A Coast Guard rescue boat pulls alongside two sailors who have abandoned their sinking landing craft.

They are wearing full life vests, rather than the life belts used by Army personnel. A line goes to the sailor nearest the boat, and the second sailor waits with a rope in hand to throw out to the second sailor.

  • Page number: 102
  • Photo number: 5-57
243. The second of the two sailors comes aboard.

Note the belt securing the rescuer to the boat.

  • Page number: 102
  • Photo number: 5-58
244. An LCM littered with debris evacuates casualties to a larger vessel.

The seriously wounded are being loaded onto a platform that will be raised onto the deck of the transport.

  • Page number: 102
  • Photo number: 5-59
245. The crew hoists the platform with casualties from the LCM on board the transport.

They are among the first casualties to be evacuated on 6 June 1944. Empty Navy litters in the foreground await the wounded.

  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 5-60
246. LCI-85, struck by German shell fire, comes close aboard Samuel Chase to off-load casualties.
  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 5-61
247. Casualties from the invasion on board an LST hospital ship are transported back to England.

Stretcher-borne casualties await assignment to a bunk.

  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 5-62
248. A seriously wounded serviceman sleeps while a tube drains fluid from his nose into a basin on the deck.
  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 5-63
249. A buttock wound forces this glum serviceman to rest on his stomach.

Note the piping along the bulkhead of the LST.

  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 5-64
250. Four Americans of the 82nd Airborne Division enter St.-Mere-Eglise in the early morning shadows of 6 June 1944.

The sergeant at left is armed with a Thompson submachine gun, Model M-1 with a 30-round box magazine. These simplified weapons differed from the M1928 version in that they would not accept the large drum magazine so often associated with the gangster era of the 1920s and 1930s. Also the front handle was replaced by a simple wooden grip.

  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-65
251. A deserted street in St.-Mere-Eglise following the 82nd Airborne assault, 10 June 1944.
  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-66
252. Two mounted members of the 82nd Airborne Division patrol the streets of St.-Mere-Eglise on 7 June 1944.
  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-67
253. Two French refugees try to communicate with an American paratrooper.
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 5-68
254. Clutching their belongings, the same two refugees at right center press on through the village.
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 5-69
255. A member of the 82nd Airborne assists two refugees who return with their belongings to St.-Mere-Eglise on 8 June 1944.
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 5-70
256. A captain of one of the 82nd Airborne’s medical detachments holds a cigarette for a comrade wounded during the fighting on 6-7 June 1944.

The man at left is probably taking down information regarding the wounded man.

  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-71
257. Dead German paratroopers from Oberst von der Heydte’s 6th Fallschirmjager Regiment are lined up and arranged for burial.
  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-72
258. C-47s of the 9th Transport Command tow in gliders past troops fighting on Utah Beach, near Les Dunes de Madeleine.
  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-73
259. Brig. Gen. Gavin, the 82nd Airborne’s bridgehead commander and assistant commander of the division, studies a map of Normandy with his chief of staff, Maj. Wilherd Harrison (right).
  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-74
260. A 9th Air Force B-26 Marauder returning to England of 6 June 1944.

This photo was taken near Lion-sur-Mer, Sword Beach, in the British landing area. Note LCTs unloading below and the bewildering patchwork quilt of the bocage behind the beaches.

  • Page number: 108
  • Photo number: 5-75
261. Bomb group routing map form the 9th Air Force on 6 June 1944.

Note the path from the English airfields to Normandy and the "last resort" target identified.

  • Page number: 108
  • Photo number: 5-76
262. The 9th Fighter Command P-51C Mustangs of the 354th Fighter Group pull up and away from their airfields in England during 6 June 19044.
  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 5-77
263. Capt. Don Beerbower (second form the left) is awarded the Silver Star for action in the skies over Normandy.
  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 5-78
264. 9th Air Force fighter pilot 2nd Lt. Robert Kelso of Jackson, Michigan, mounts his P-47D Thunderbolt during the early days of the invasion.
  • Page number: 110
  • Photo number: 5-79
265. U.S. naval aviators of Cruiser Scouting Squadron 7 (VCS-7) are briefed before flying gun-spotting missions over the Normandy beachheads.

Reading (left to right): unidentified, Wing Comdr. Robert Hardiman, RAF, commanding Allied spotting pilots; Ens. Robert Adams, USNR; Maj. Noel East, British Army Intelligence; Lt. Harris Hammersmith Jr. USNR; Capt. John Ruscoe, Royal Artillery, gunnery liaison officer.

  • Page number: 110
  • Photo number: 5-80
266. Curtiss SOC Seagulls left behind in England by U.S. Navy observation pilots. Maintenance men service aircraft to keep the machines ready for action.

A lone Vought OS2U Kingfisher lies at far right in the distance.

  • Page number: 111
  • Photo number: 5-81
267. Lt. Robert Doyle shakes hands with his wingman, Ens. John Mudgem after their return from a gun-spotting and strafing mission.
  • Page number: 111
  • Photo number: 5-82
268. Two patrol craft maneuver off the starboard beam of Ancon while standing by off Omaha Beach during the landings of 7 June 1944.
  • Page number: 112
  • Photo number: 6-1
269. Joint Operations Room on board Ancon.

The message on the blackboard at right reads, "Again we have been asked to do the impossible. Let’s do it as usual."

  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 6-2
270. A pensive Gen. Eisenhower sips a cup of coffee somewhere in the English Channel off the coast of France, probably aboard the minelayer HMS Apollo.
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 6-3
271. "You name is, boss, we’ll hit it."

Crews on the battleship Arkansas deliver a message to their skipper, Capt. Frederick Richards. Note details of range finder at right. At left on the forecastle, crewmen limber up with a medicine ball.

  • Page number: 114
  • Photo number: 6-4
272. One of the invasion beaches photographed from a 9th Air Force reconnaissance aircraft.
  • Page number: 114
  • Photo number: 6-5
273. Another reconnaissance aircraft photograph s a German motorized column struggling to move up to the Normandy front.
  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 6-6
274. AN aerial shot of the vehicles (tanks or DUKWs) coming ashore, the men clustered on the beach, and the landing craft at center.
  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 6-7
275. An improvised wire-mesh road provides a thoroughfare fro supplies moving up.

Note the rocky, gravelly nature of the ground and the markers for the beach.

  • Page number: 116
  • Photo number: 6-8
276. A French peasant gives information to a corporal of the 29th Division during the push inland on 7 June 1944 near Vierville-sur-Mer.

The two soldiers at left are armed with an M-1 carbine and Thompson submachine gun.

  • Page number: 116
  • Photo number: 6-9
277. Minesweeper USS Tide (AM-125) burns after striking a mine near the invasion beaches.

PT-509 (at left) and Pheasant (AM-61) at right stand by Tide which lies at center.

  • Page number: 117
  • Photo number: 6-10
278. Members of the 101st Airborne Division charm the locals in Ste.-Marie-du-Mont.

All the young girls are at the center of attention.

  • Page number: 117
  • Photo number: 6-11
279. C-47s and the 9th Transport Command fly low over Utah Beach during the effort to resupply troops of the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions.

Another group of C-47s is at the lower left.C-47s of the Troop Carrier Command, 9th Air Force, tow gliders over the bomb-packed shores.

  • Page number: 118
  • Photo number: 6-12
280. C-47s of the Troop Carrier Command, 9th Air Force, tow gliders over the bomb-packed shores.
  • Page number: 118
  • Photo number: 6-13
281. 9th Air Force gliders clutter fields during Airborne landings in support of the Normandy invasion.

Sherman tanks are on the road in the middle distance, and C-47s circle overhead.

  • Page number: 118
  • Photo number: 6-14
282. Swooping down low, a C-47 prepares to drop out supplies to the Americans waiting below.

Parachutes from the previous drop appear at top.

  • Page number: 119
  • Photo number: 6-15
283. A C-47 dropping supplies and equipment.
  • Page number: 119
  • Photo number: 6-16
284. Parachutes blossom, no doubt to the great relief of those on the ground.
  • Page number: 120
  • Photo number: 6-17
285. Airborne personnel below scurry to retrieve supplies left behind in the parachute drop.
  • Page number: 120
  • Photo number: 6-18
286. Roaring past the cameraman at low altitude, a C-47 picks up a Waco glider in Normandy.
  • Page number: 121
  • Photo number: 6-19
287. Troops of the 101st Airborne receive directions from Military Police (MPs) stationed at a crossroads.

The gliders in the background are of the British Airspeed "Horse" type.

  • Page number: 121
  • Photo number: 6-20
288. A wrecked American glider that crashed in an orchard near Ste.-Marie-du-Mont on 7 June 1944.

Note the invasion stripes on the wings and serial number visible on the tail.

  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 6-21
289. Dead American soldiers lie near their glider.

A gas can and rations ("Field Ration K – Breakfast Unit") are also strewn about.

  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 6-22
290. Crash-landed Allied glider near Hiesville, about four miles southeast of Ste.-Mere-Eglise, on 7 June 1944.
  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 6-23
291. Elements of the 101st Airborne press toward the village of St.-Marcouf during 8 June 1944.
  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 6-24
292. With the rest of his squad pressing forward, a technician 5th grade looks to the rear, past the cameraman.

The soldiers carry a mix of M-1 carbines and rifles. The soldier at far right advances with a fixed bayonet.

  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 6-25
293. Paratroopers mingle with French civilians at St.-Marcouf.
  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 6-26
294. Soldiers stay near trees and edge of the road, ready to take advantage of cover if necessary.

The village sign has been censored.

  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 6-27
295. Portions of a machine gun detachment advance into town.

The man at left carries a machine gun, while the man behind him carries a supply of ammunition. The soldier in the background makes ready to come onto the road, perhaps after exploring the rear to the right of the road.

  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 6-28
296. A detachment form the 101st Airborne Division with a tracked vehicle occupies the first of many French villages and towns to come.

Note the soldiers’ 101st patches, which the omnipresent censor missed.

  • Page number: 125
  • Photo number: 6-29
297. Some 101st Airborne members proudly display their newly won war trophies – a small German national flag and German helmet.

Note the hand Grenades and all of the equipment the paratroopers carry.

  • Page number: 125
  • Photo number: 6-30
298. Troops pouring into the beaches included this detachment f the 5th Engineer Special Brigade, seen here splashing through the surf at Fox Green, Omaha Beach, on 8 June 1944.
  • Page number: 126
  • Photo number: 6-31
299. "Yanks everywhere."

Seen at Red Uncle, Utah Beach, on 8 June 1944. Note the beach identification sign and landing craft in the distance. The truck at left prepares to move up the road cut through the dunes. A wire-mesh road has been laid to facilitate traffic moving up and down the beach.

  • Page number: 126
  • Photo number: 6-32
300. The destroyer escort USS Rich (DE-695) detonates a second mine amidships after losing 50 feet of its stern three minutes before.

The ship’s 1.1-inch quadruple AA mount aft, just before where the first mine sheared off the stern, is still visible.

  • Page number: 126
  • Photo number: 6-33
301. A black medic administers first aid on Omaha Beach on 8 June 1944.

Apparently he is removing bits of Shrapnel from the patient’s face and neck.

  • Page number: 127
  • Photo number: 6-34
302. A casualty being helped aboard an LCVP for evacuation to England clutches a carton of Chesterfield cigarettes.

The broad band around the helmets of those assisting designate Navy personnel. A man in the background wades back toward the beach.

  • Page number: 127
  • Photo number: 6-35
303. His Chesterfields tucked safely away, the wounded man in the pervious photo rests in the landing craft while being transported away from France.

Note the Navy men wearing life vests. The wounded soldier immediately in front of the loading ramp has a German helmet as a souvenir, and the man at lower left shields his eyes form the sun.

  • Page number: 127
  • Photo number: 6-36
304. Senior U.S. officers watch landing operations from Augusta, flagship of the Western Naval Task Force, in the morning shadows of 8 June 1944.

Left to right: Rear Adm. Kirk, commander of Western Naval Task Force; Lt. Gen. Bradley, commander of American Ground Forces; unidentified; Capt. Arthur Struble, Kirk’s chief of staff; and Maj. Gen. Hugh Keen.

  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 6-37
305. Bradley clambers up a "Jacob’s ladder" while coming on board a warship, 8 June 1944, to confer with Gen. Montgomery and Adm. Ramsay, overall commanders of the land and sea operations in Normandy.
  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 6-38
306. Montgomery climbs on board for the Bradley-Ramsay conference.
  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 6-39
307. U.S. invasion force commanders inspect Omaha Beach on 8 June 1944.

Kirk is at left. Hall, wearing a helmet, is under the beach marker. Bradley stands at right.

  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 6-40
308. USAAF officers of a bulldozer battalion from the 9th Aviation Engineer Command confer during the construction of the 9th Air Force’s emergency landing field near the invasion beaches.

Left to right: Capt. Raymond Carlen and Lt. Col. John Livingston talk with Maj. Gen. Ralph Boyce, deputy commander of the 9th Air Force, and Col. Philip Cole.

  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 6-41
309. Construction crews lay out Hessian mat material on an emergency landing trip just a few miles behind the front lines.
  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 6-42
310. Crew of a 9th Troop Carrier Command C-47 – the first such aircraft to land on the beachhead in France during 8 June 1944.

Note the crudely painted invasion stripes.

  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 6-43
311. "Rick O’Shay II," the first P-47 to land on the first runway in Normandy, is armed with a bomb.

All 9th Air Force fighter groups were officially referred to as fighter-bomber groups, reflecting the more diverse mission that would be required in the coming months.

  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 6-44
312. A DUWK traverses an entry through the dunes at Red Uncle, Utah Beach, on 9 June 1944.

Note the beach marker at left.

  • Page number: 130
  • Photo number: 6-45
313. Army surgeons work on casualties at a medical clearing station near the beaches during 9 June 1944.
  • Page number: 130
  • Photo number: 6-46
314. Distinguished Service Crosses were awarded to leaders of the 101st Airborne on 9 June 1944.

Left to right: Maj. Gen. Taylor, division commander; Lt. Col. Patrick Cassidy, commanding 1st Battalion, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment; Capt. Frank Lilyman, commander of 101st Airborne Pathfinders; and Chaplain john Maloney.

  • Page number: 131
  • Photo number: 6-47
315. Armed with an M-1 Thompson submachine gun, a paratrooper of the 101st Airborne stands guard on 9 June 1944, over a German burial detail digging graves for their own dead.

Taken during the 101st Airborne drive on Varentan, 9 June 1944. The prisoners likely come from the 1058th Grenadier Regiment, 91st Division, taken during the fighting at St. Come-du-Mont.

  • Page number: 131
  • Photo number: 6-48
316. Liberty ships Charles Morgan down by the stern off Utah Beach on 10 June 1944.

LST-474 is alongside rendering assistance.

  • Page number: 132
  • Photo number: 6-49
317. An ACS (landing craft, support) modified for hydrographic duties, serves as a survey boat on 10 June 1944.

Note the survey flag, the stripes on the helmets of the sailors, and a transport lying in the distance.

  • Page number: 132
  • Photo number: 6-50
318. A platoon of black troops, armed with rifles and carbines, surround a farmhouse in an effort to clear snipers from the area near Vierville-sur-Mer on 10 June 1944.

They are led by Capt. Samuel Broussard of Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, shown at the corner of the building. The vertical stripe identifies him as an officer.

  • Page number: 132
  • Photo number: 6-51
319. Capt. Broussard climbs down from the ladder after searching the farmhouse.
  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 6-52
320. The dead German sniper has been picked off by an advancing black assault unit.
  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 6-53
321. NavNavy beach battalion members dive fro cover during a German strafing attack on 11 June 1944.y beach battalion members dive fro cover during a German strafing attack on 11 June 1944.

The horizontal helmet band identifies these men as Navy Personnel.

  • Page number: 134
  • Photo number: 6-54
322. The same strafers attack a Rhino ferry.

The man lying on his side at left appears to have been hit.

  • Page number: 134
  • Photo number: 6-55
323. U.S. Navy command post on one of the invasion beaches.

Note the helmet bands, signal lamp, a bull horn, and the heavily sandbagged structure.

  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 6-56
324. A Navy hospital corpsman takes time to send a letter home, using a V-Mail form.
  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 6-57
325. V-Mail form provided to Navy servicemen so that they might notify home newspapers or radio stations of their role in the invasion.
  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 6-58
326. Prime Minister Churchill journeys to the invasion beaches.

He chats with Gen. Brooke on the deck of the destroyer HMS Kelvin. Note Churchill’s ever-present cigar and the machine gun at center behind the two men.

  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 6-59
327. Gen. Smuts gazes toward the coast of France during the voyage to Montgomery’s headquarters.
  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 6-60
328. Gen. Montgomery steps off the launch bringing Churchill, Smuts, and Brooke to Montgomery’s headquarters.
  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 6-61
329. American Army and Navy Chiefs pay their first visit to the beachheads of France on 12 June 1944.

Rear Adm. Kirk disembarks (at left) from the DUKW, followed by Generals Marshall, Arnold, and Eisenhower.

  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 6-62
330. The "Big Brass" in Normandy (left to right): General Arnold, Admiral King, General Eisenhower, and General Marshall.

One wonders what has their attention at right.

  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 6-63
331. M-4 Sherman tank "Cannon Ball" lies mired on Omaha Beach, 12 June 1944.
  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 6-64
332. An Army Dodge 4X4, 3/4-ton truck, nicknamed "Sadie," comes ashore on Utah Beach during the 12 June 1944 landings.

The stenciling on the front bumper has been censored, but the truck likely carries troops of the 90th Infantry Division.

  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 6-65
333. Low tide leaves a pontoon causeway high and dry on 12 June 1944. Note the breakwater of sunken vessels on the horizon.
  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 6-66
334. With LST-325 stranded at low tide, workmen construct a sand ramp at left to permit unloading.
  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 6-67
335. Troops of the 101st Airborne push forward on 12 June 1944, through Carentan, the first French town taken by the Allied armies in Normandy.

Note the highway signs on the restaurant on the corner. The jeep at left tows an antitank gun.

  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 6-68
336. Destroyer USS Nelson (DD-623) in dry dock at Portsmouth, England, showing torpedo damage sustained on 13 June 1944.
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 6-69
337. Nelson proceeds toward Boston under heavy tow on 26 August 1944 following temporary repairs at Londonderry, Northern Ireland.

Towline extends from the bow.

  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 6-70
338. 1st lt. Merle Kirstein from Des Moines, Iowa, uses a metal detector to ferret out any antipersonnel mines that may still lie buried in a minefield.

Note the German Minen sign and the mines awaiting disposal.

  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 6-71
339. Seen from an American LST, evacuations – American wounded and POWs – are under way.
  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 6-72
340. Stretchers bearers take the first of two wounded servicemen onto a waiting LST. This photo was apparently taken at low tide.

Note the dozer behind the jeep.

  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 6-73
341. Destroyer HMS Scorpion, which bore visiting Adm. Stark, commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe, across the English Channel on his inspection tour of the invasion beaches on 14 June 1944.

This picture was taken just before Stark boarded.

  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 6-74
342. Adm. Stark and Rear Adm. Kirk on board Scorpion en route to Normandy.

Kirk’s short sip-up makes him easy to identify in a large number of photos.

  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 6-75
343. Rear Adm. Kirk boards Augusta (CA-31) during Stark’s visit to Normandy.

Note the heavy cruiser’s graded camouflage, rivet heads on the side of the ship, and the boarding ladder.

  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 6-76
344. PT-199 chops its way through the waters off Normandy, speeding Adm. Stark and his party toward their destination.

Note British hospital ship at left.

  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 6-77
345. Adm. Stark on his inspection tour of the beaches; Rear Adm. Kirk sits in the back seat.

The two other officers are unidentified.

  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 6-78
346. Scene at Omaha Beach on 14 June 1944, at a newly constructed airfield overlooking the beach near St. Laurent.

A P-38J or L with invasion stripes, likely being employed in convoy cover, lies parked on the very end of the runway.

  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 6-79
347. On 14 June 1944, a forlorn P-47D rests on an invasion beach where it crash-landed during the early phases of the landings.

The site is probably Utah Beach, as there are no high bluffs or cliffs behind the beach in the background.

  • Page number: 145
  • Photo number: 6-80
348. A flood of men and vehicles continues to pour into Omaha Beach.

Note the DUKW at right, the jeep and trailer at center, and the grading equipment at left, and a barrage balloon still floating above the beach.

  • Page number: 145
  • Photo number: 6-81
349. Another 50 yards down the road lies a clearing station and information station.

The influx was presumably the 2nd Division, whose lead elements disembarked on 12 June 1944.

  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 6-82
350. Transports and landing craft off Omaha Beach, 14 June 1944.

A nest of LCMs lies moored to the transport at right. Note the LCVP at left and its smaller comparative size to the LCMs, which were designed to land vehicles.

  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 6-83
351. LST-133 Down by the stern and beached off Normandy on 15 June 1944, after striking a German mine.
  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 6-84
352. PFC Rocco Festa, of the 2nd Division’s Headquarters and Military Police Company, tries his hand at French as he awaits transfer to a landing craft on 15 June 1944.

This was no idle diversion, for an MP’s contact with the civilian population would be considerable.

  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 6-85
353. Chaplain John Donovan, attached to the 1st Army’s 51st Field Hospital, chats with 2nd Lt. Paula Krull on Omaha Beach, 15 June 1944.

She was one of the first frontline nurses to arrive in Normandy.

  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 6-86
354. Panorama of a Navy beach master unit during the post invasion buildup, 15 June 1944.
  • Page number: 148-149
  • Photo number: 6-87
355. U.S. small craft recovery and repair unit on 15 June 1944.
  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 6-88
356. Panoramic view of Omaha Beach around mid-June 1944.
  • Page number: 148-149
  • Photo number: 6-89
357. A jeep rolls out of LST-282 onto an LCT during its transfer to the invasion beaches 15 June 1944.
  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 6-90
358. Army truck lumbers off an LCM onto a Rhino causeway.

Note the man at left perched on a bollard.

  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 6-91
359. Vehicles proceed down the Rhino causeway toward Omaha Beach
  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 6-92
360. Black Seabees labor to secure wire-mesh roadway material on to the sands of Omaha Beach.
  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 6-93
361. An American M-3 half-track leads a column of vehicles about to exit the causeway onto Omaha Beach, completing its transfer from England to France.
  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 6-94
362. After its construction in Portsmouth, England, a Phoenix caisson with an AA mount is towed into position across from one of the British invasion beaches.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 6-95
363. U.S. Army tugs coax a Phoenix caisson across the English Channel for placement in one the artificial harbors off Normandy.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 6-96
364. Caissons placed in position and sunk as part of the breakwater for the Mulberry artificial harbors.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 6-97
365. An American Liberty ship stands ready to be scuttled and become a portion of an artificial Gooseberry breakwater off one of the invasion beaches.
  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 6-98
366. Line of ships in the distance form Gooseberry breakwater.

German obstructions are piled up on Omaha Beach following their removal.

  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 6-99
367. Aerial photo of Mulberry under construction at one of the American beaches.

The Gooseberry breakwater does not show in the photo.

  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 6-100
368. Waves batter a Mulberry harbor during the Great Storm.

The ship at right is the old British battleship Centurion, sunk to serve as a breakwater and as an AA emplacement.

  • Page number: 155
  • Photo number: 6-101
369. Landing vessels, battered by the storm, crash into the piers.
  • Page number: 155
  • Photo number: 6-102
370. Twisted remains of the beachhead bridge at Omaha Beach following the storm.
  • Page number: 155
  • Photo number: 6-103
371. An aerial view of Cherbourg, taken 21 June 1944, approximately a week before its capture by the Americans.

The breakwaters, projected harbor, and the bocage beyond the city’s outskirts are all visible.

  • Page number: 156
  • Photo number: 7-1
372. Center of the town of Valognes on 24 June 1944, in the wake of the 313th Infantry Regiment, 79th Division.

Note the jeep nicknamed "Always Ruth" and the trucks and power equipment already at work clearing the rubble.

  • Page number: 157
  • Photo number: 7-2
373. USS Quincy (CA-71) lobs a salvo from number III turret past the cruiser HMS Glasgow (right).
  • Page number: 157
  • Photo number: 7-3
374. Nevada, of Force Group 1, shells German shore batteries near Cherbourg.
  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 7-4
375. Guns of Nevada’s number IV turret belch flame and smoke during the bombardment of targets west of Cherbourg.
  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 7-5
376. Seen from the cruiser’s bridge, German shells splash off Quincy’s bow during the bombardment.

Note 20mm AA mounts on the bow.

  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 7-6
377. The duel with "Battery Hamburg."

Enemy fire falls far short during the Texas’s battle with the four German 288mm guns located near Fermanville, six miles east of Cherbourg.

  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 7-7
378. A German 240mm dud that struck Texas at 1234.

Rear Adm. Bryant and Capt. Charles Baker stand guard over the trophy.

  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 7-8
379. Germen shells fall within 200 yards of Texas, now joined by Arkansas, the ship from which this photograph was taken.
  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 7-9
380. Cherbourg during 26 June 1944, seen from one of the concrete pillboxes overlooking the city.

An Army major is in the foreground, and the harbor facilities are off in the distance.

  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 7-10
381. Generalleutnant von Schlieben steps ashore in England as a POW subsequent to his surrender on 26 June 1944.
  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 7-11
382. American blow up a pillbox during the final assaults on Cherbourg during 28 June 1944.

Note the concertina wire in the foreground.

  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 7-12
383. Near one of the city’s fortifications, German POWs from Cherbourg await transfer to POW camps on 28 June 1944.

The American guards at left appear curiously nonchalant.

  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 7-13
384. German troops march through the streets of Cherbourg and into captivity for the duration of the war.

Note the carbine carried by the American captain at the head of the column and the man armed wit a pistol on the right.

  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 7-14
385. A French civilian stands at attention alongside the American battalion commander during the playing of "The Star Spangled Banner" in Cherbourg on 28 June 1944.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 7-15
386. 7th Corps commander, Maj. Gen. Collins, describes to Lt. Gen. Bradley how the corps took Cherbourg.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 7-16
387. Maj. Gen. Barton, commander of the 4th Infantry Division during the Cherbourg campaign, receives a kiss from a young French woman.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 7-17
388. View of Gare Maritime, the railway ferry terminal in Cherbourg harbor, showing the work of German demolition teams.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 7-18
389. Cherbourg Railway Station, where a collapsed section of roof pins a freight car to the track.
  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 7-19
390. A damaged German gun emplacement in the fortifications near Cherbourg harbor.

Camouflage netting hangs in ruins.

  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 7-20
391. View of Slipway Number 1 on 4 July 1944, looking toward basin napoleon III. The old cannons are used as bollards.
  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 7-21
392. Incomplete German V-1 launching site near Cherbourg on 12 July 1944, with a view of the rear of the launch ramp.
  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 7-22
393. Front view of the V-1 launch ramp; note staff car at right.

Camouflage netting at left appears to be hiding some additional construction materials.

  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 7-23
394. Two British minesweepers detonate German mines in the waters off Cherbourg just before a convoy of supply ships enters during 2 July 1944.

Fort L’Ouest is in the background.

  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 7-24
395. American Army engineers work to disable a live mine found underneath the docks at Cherbourg.
  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 7-25
396. An American 2-8-0 "Consolidation" locomotive swings out from the SS Seatrain Texas and is placed upon rails on 13 July 1944.

This was part of the effort to replace French rolling stock destroyed during the fighting and by German demolition teams, whose work Hitler later commended as "exemplary."

  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 7-26
397. A U.S. medical corpsman gives candy to a French girl injured in the invasion.
  • Page number: 164
  • Photo number: 8-1
398. A German 88mm gun protrudes from a battered pillbox on Omaha Beach. This photo was taken on 4 August 1944.
  • Page number: 164
  • Photo number: 8-2
399. Damage to the muzzle break of the gun in photo 8-2.
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-3
400. A soldier holds up his Strateline ruler to document damage to this German turret in the Utah Beach fortifications.
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-4
401. Children playing with debris left behind by the retreating German Army.
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-5
402. A dead American soldier rests in a temporary grave, awaiting disinterment and reburial in the large cemetery.
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-6
403. French peasants pay their respects to an American who met with his death far from home.
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-7
404. Army officers examine papers left behind in a pillbox along the Normandy coast.
  • Page number: 166
  • Photo number: 8-8
405. PFC Michael Rolish takes a rare moment to relax and take off his shoes.
  • Page number: 166
  • Photo number: 8-9
406. A German NCO is brought in at the point of a bayonet.
  • Page number: 166
  • Photo number: 8-10
407. German POWs bear a stricken comrade to a landing craft waiting on the beach at Normandy.
  • Page number: 167
  • Photo number: 8-11
408. German soldiers being searched and questioned in an encampment on the Normandy beachhead.
  • Page number: 167
  • Photo number: 8-12
409. Resting in an enclosure on Utah Beach, German prisoners await transport to camps in England.

This photo was taken on 6 June 1944.

  • Page number: 167
  • Photo number: 8-13
410. Captured Germans "feast" on K rations on Omaha Beach during 9 June 1944.
  • Page number: 167
  • Photo number: 8-14
411. A forlorn group of German POWs trudges to the transports that will carry them to England.
  • Page number: 168
  • Photo number: 8-15
412. Italian and German prisoners on board Texas being taken to camps in England during June 1944.
  • Page number: 168
  • Photo number: 8-16
413. German POWs disembark from an LCT at a port somewhere in England.
  • Page number: 168
  • Photo number: 8-17
414. Montgomery’s personal C-47 rests on the hardstand at a fighter base in Normandy on 19 July 1944.

As the sign indicates, this was a special parking place for aircraft belonging to four-star generals.

  • Page number: 169
  • Photo number: 8-18
415. Montgomery meets with Eisenhower following the initial campaign.
  • Page number: 169
  • Photo number: 8-19
416. During this meeting Eisenhower chats with one of the RAF pilots of his fighter escort for the flight to France.
  • Page number: 169
  • Photo number: 8-20
417. A sergeant and a technician 5th grade study French with two members of the Women’s Army Corps (WACs) while crossing the English Channel during 15 July 1944.
  • Page number: 170
  • Photo number: 8-21
418. The first WACs to arrive in France disembark from a transport and pile into an LCM on 15 July 1944.
  • Page number: 171
  • Photo number: 8-22
419. Field nurses of the 13th Field Hospital, the first to arrive in Normandy, enjoy one of many meals in the field.
  • Page number: 170
  • Photo number: 8-23
420. Military life begins to return to normal, 17 July 1944.
  • Page number: 171
  • Photo number: 8-24
421. Soldiers eat and listen to the latest news on their Philco radio outside their pup tents on the Normandy beachhead, 12 June 1944.
  • Page number: 171
  • Photo number: 8-25
422. Cpl. Charles Vaughn a barber from Lush, Wyoming, opens up shop in Normandy.
  • Page number: 171
  • Photo number: 8-26
423. Two USO performers, Stephanie Dale and Josephine Del Mar, step out of the "ladies only" facilities at the show on 25 July 1944.
  • Page number: 171
  • Photo number: 8-27
424. American soldiers crowd around an improvised stage at the first USO camp show in France on 26 July 1944.
  • Page number: 172
  • Photo number: 8-28
425. Army nurses and servicemen line up on 8 August 1944 for an almost first-run movie, Casanova Brown, starring Gary Cooper and Teresa Wright.
  • Page number: 172
  • Photo number: 8-29
426. Navy Seabees take a break in their routine for some refreshments.

Note the fresh flowers on the vehicle’s counter at right.

  • Page number: 172
  • Photo number: 8-30
427. Jewish services proceed in Normandy quite unhindered on the shores of Hitler’s "Fortress Europe."
  • Page number: 172
  • Photo number: 8-31
428. American troops present arms in tribute to their fallen comrades who lie buried in a temporary cemetery on the beachhead at Omaha Beach, 12 June 1944.
  • Page number: 173
  • Photo number: 9-1
429. On 25 June 1944, Chaplain Paul McGovern leads a group of combat engineers in prayer during a memorial service at the temporary cemetery on Omaha Beach.
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 9-2
430. French civilian sand some German POWs work on construction of the permanent cemetery on Omaha Beach, 4 August 1944.
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 9-3
431. In the background of the previous photo, French workers set crosses upon the graves of the slain American soldiers.
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 9-4
432. Ste.-Mere-Eglise Cemetery, 1 June 1945.
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 9-5
433. Aerial view of the Normandy Cemetery, 28 May 1957.
  • Page number: 175
  • Photo number: 9-6
434. Two men pay tribute to the fallen.
  • Page number: 175
  • Photo number: 9-7
Folder 20-25 Extras, 1942 - 1964
Folder 13-19 D-Day Documentary, 1942 - 1964

Box Photo 8
Folder 1-4 D-Day Documentary, 1940s

Section: Fading Victory: The Diary of Admiral Matome Ugaki, 1941-1945

Folder 5-6 Published Images, 1936 - 1945
1. The Pacific Theater; Credit: Hydrographic Office, U.S. Navy
  • Page number: P1
  • Photo number: 1
2. His Imperial Majesty Hirohito, Emperor of Japan (UPI Photo)
  • Page number: P2
  • Photo number: 2
3. Ugaki’s family in 1936, when he was a captain.

To his left is his wife Tomoko. Hiromitsu, his son, stands behind Ugaki. The seated young man is unidentified. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)

  • Page number: P3
  • Photo number: 3
4. Portion of Ugaki’s preface to his diary. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)
  • Page number: P3
  • Photo number: 4
5. Ugaki’s entry for 7 December 1941. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)
  • Page number: P4
  • Photo number: 5
6. Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, Commander in Chief, Combined Fleet. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 6
7. Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, Commander in Chief, Combined Fleet; inset. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 7
8. Admiral Yamamoto with members of the Combined Fleet staff and the subordinate fleet commanders.

First row, sitting: VADM Mitsumi Shimizu, VADM Hosokaya, VADM Nobutake Kondo, Adm. Yamamoto, VADM Shira Takasu, VADM Chuichi Nagumo, VADM Nishizo Tsukahara, VADM Shigeyoshi Inouye. (Gordon W. Prange collection)

  • Page number: P6
  • Photo number: 8
9. Rear Admiral Takijiro Onishi, founder of the kamikaze special attack force. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P6
  • Photo number: 9
10. Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo, commander in chief of Pearl Harbor Task Force. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P7
  • Photo number: 10
11. Capt. Shiegnori Kami, staff officer, Naval General Staff. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P8
  • Photo number: 11
12. Rear Admiral Ryunosuke Kusaka. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P8
  • Photo number: 12
13. Admiral Yamamoto (seated fifth from the right) and staff of Combined Fleet.

Ugaki is seated to Yamamoto’s right. (Gordon W. Prange collection)

  • Page number: P8
  • Photo number: 13
14. Vice Admiral Jisaburo Ozawa, commander, Southern Expeditionary Fleet; later commander in chief, Third Fleet (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P9
  • Photo number: 14
15. Admiral Osami Nagano, chief, Naval General Staff. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P9
  • Photo number: 15
16. Rear Admiral Takeo Kurita (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P9
  • Photo number: 16
17. Vice Admiral Mitsumi Shimizu. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 17
18. Rear Admiral Tamon Yamaguchi, commander in chief, Second Carrier Division. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 18
19. Captain Yasuji Watanabe, plans officer, Combined Fleet. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 19
20. Admiral Teijiro Toyoda, foreign minister, Third Konoye Cabinet. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 20
21. Admiral Soemu Toyoda, commander in chief, Combined Fleet, in the later years of the war. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P11
  • Photo number: 21
22. Captain (Baron) Sadatoshi Tomioka, chief, First Section, Naval General Staff. (Gordon W. Prange collection)
  • Page number: P11
  • Photo number: 22
23. Type 97 attack plane of the second wave pulls up and away from Shokaku’s flight deck in the early morning light of 7 December 1941. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P12
  • Photo number: 23
24. Admiral C.W. Nimitz assumes command of commander in chief, Pacific Fleet, 31 December 1941. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P12
  • Photo number: 24
25. Operations Section, Naval General Staff, 11 December 1941.

Front row: Capt. Sadatoshi Tomioka, Cmdr. HIH Prince Nobuhito Takamatsu, RADM Shigeru Fukudome, Capt. Shigenori Kami. Back row: Cmdr. Nasatomo Nakano, Cmdr. Shigeshi Uchida, Cmdr. Sadamu Sanagi, Lt. Cmdr. Marquis Hironobu Katcho, Cmdr. Yuji Yamamoto, Cmdr. Tatsukichi Miyo. (Gordon W. Prange collection)

  • Page number: P13
  • Photo number: 25
26. Rear Admiral Frank J. Fletcher, Commander, U.S. Task Force 17. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P13
  • Photo number: 26
27. Rear Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, Commander, U.S. Task Force 16. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P13
  • Photo number: 27
28. Torpedo hit on Yorktown. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P13
  • Photo number: 28
29. Yorktown sinking, January 1942. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P14
  • Photo number: 29
30. Burning oil tanks on Midway Island after they were hit by Japanese bombs, 4-6 June 1942. (Defense Dept. Photo, Marine Corps)
  • Page number: P15
  • Photo number: 30
31. USS Enterprise. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P15
  • Photo number: 31
32. Japanese heavy cruiser knocked out by carrier planes in the battle of Midway, June 1942. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P16
  • Photo number: 32
33. Japanese fleet under attack by carrier-based aircraft west of the Marianas, 19 June 1944. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P16
  • Photo number: 33
34. Japanese carrier bombed and torpedoed by U.S. Navy planes, 24 October 1944. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P17
  • Photo number: 34
35. Japanese submarine I-55. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P18
  • Photo number: 35
36. Zuikaku claimed more battle honors than any other Japanese carrier.

With the exception of the battle of Midway, she participated in nearly every major carrier action of the war. She was sunk on 25 October 1944 at the battle of Cape Engaeo. (U.S. Navy)

  • Page number: P18
  • Photo number: 36
37. Close-up of Japanese kamikaze just before crashing on USS Essex, 25 November 1944. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P19
  • Photo number: 37
38. Shokaku, Japanese aircraft carrier. (Naval History Photo)
  • Page number: P19
  • Photo number: 38
39. The battleship Yamato sunk by U.S. Navy planes in the East China Sea, 17 April 1945. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P20
  • Photo number: 40
40. The USS Bunker Hill takes two kamikazes in thirty seconds, 11 May 1945. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P21
  • Photo number: 41
41. Ugaki addressing kamikaze pilots at Oita, 15 August 1945. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)
  • Page number: P22
  • Photo number: 42
42. Ugaki stripping his rank from his uniform before his last flight. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)
  • Page number: P22
  • Photo number: 43
43. Ugaki says good-bye to his staff at Oita before his final flight.

Note sword in his left hand, given to him by Admiral Yamamoto. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)

  • Page number: P22
  • Photo number: 44
44. Ugaki standing before his plane prior to his final flight. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)
  • Page number: P23
  • Photo number: 45
45. Last known photo of Ugaki as his plane leaves from Oita. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)
  • Page number: P23
  • Photo number: 46
46. Ugaki’s writing on the eve of leaving for Rabaul on 2 April 1943.

"Life exists in death / Life doesn’t exis in life. April of 1943, on the eve of going to the front line. Written Matome." (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)

  • Page number: P24
  • Photo number: 47
47. Rare photograph of Ugaki relaxing before his final flight. (Courtesy of Masataka Chihaya)
  • Page number: P24
  • Photo number: 48
Folder 7 Extras, undated

Section: God's Samurai: Lead Pilot at Pearl Harbor

Folder 8 Published Images, 1910 - 1964
1. Fuchida's mother, Shika, and father, Yazo.

Nagao, Nara Prefecture, ca. 1910.

  • Page number: P1
  • Photo number: 1
2. Fuchida (second from left) in February 1919 as a 17-year-old student at the Unebi Middle School.

Although uniforms were mandatory, it was not a military school.

  • Page number: P2
  • Photo number: 2
3. Flight school at Kasumigaura, which Fuchida attended for a year from December 1927.

He is the serious one on the right.

  • Page number: P2
  • Photo number: 3
4. Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo, commander of the First Air Fleet.
  • Page number: P3
  • Photo number: 4
5. Commander Minoru Genda, air staff officer of the First Air Fleet, and chief planner of the attack on Pearl Harbor.
  • Page number: P3
  • Photo number: 5
6. Commander Fuchida leading the training for the Pearl Harbor attack.

October 1941, Kagoshima Air Base.

  • Page number: P4
  • Photo number: 6
7. The farewell meeting in the wardroom of the carrier Agaki just before setting off for Hawaii, November 25, 1941.

Fuchida is fourth from the left, in the rear. The ship's skipper, Captain Kiichi Hasegawa, is second.

  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 7
8. no caption
  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 8
9. December 1941.

On the flight deck of the carrier Agaki en route to Hawaii.

  • Page number: P6
  • Photo number: 9
10. Fuchida, in center wearing white cap, chats with his fellow pilots the day before the attack.
  • Page number: P6
  • Photo number: 10
11. A Zero of the second wave raced down Shokaku's flight deck.
  • Page number: P7
  • Photo number: 11
12. Under the watchful eyes of an officer, the aircrews are stirred by an exhortation written on a chalkboard above the flight deck: "Japanese Imperial Fleet! You have to obey and die for your country, Japan! Win or lose, you will fight and die for your country!"
  • Page number: P7
  • Photo number: 12
13. no caption
  • Page number: P7
  • Photo number: 13
14. Pearl Harbor as it appeared to Fuchida on the morning of December 7, 1941.

Captured Japanese photographs. (U.S. Navy)

  • Page number: P8
  • Photo number: 14
15. Pearl Harbor as it appeared to Fuchida on the morning of December 7, 1941.

Captured Japanese photographs. (U.S. Navy)

  • Page number: P9
  • Photo number: 15
16. Pearl Harbor as it appeared to Fuchida on the morning of December 7, 1941.

Captured Japanese photographs. (U.S. Navy)

  • Page number: P9
  • Photo number: 16
17. Battleship row under attack.

Left to right: Nevada, Vestal alongside Arizona, West Virginia alongside Tennessee, Oklahoma alongside Maryland, Neosho, California. Note the West Virginia listing to port immediately after a torpedo hit. Torpedo tracks and shock waves are visible. (U.S. Navy)

  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 17
18. Planes and hangers burn at Wheeler Army Air Field just after being attacked, as seen from a Japanese plane. (U.S. Navy)
  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 18
19. The forward magazine of the Shaw explodes.

At the right is the Nevada. Photographed from Ford Island. (U.S. Navy)

  • Page number: P11
  • Photo number: 19
20. Sailors of the submarines Dolphin (left) and Narwhal battle back against the second attack wave. (National Archives)
  • Page number: P11
  • Photo number: 20
21. The parade ground of the marine Barracks between 9:00 and 10:00 A.M.
  • Page number: P12
  • Photo number: 21
22. One of approximately 29 Japanese aircraft downed during the battle.
  • Page number: P12
  • Photo number: 22
23. June 1943, at Kanoya.

Fuchida, now a commander and the senior operations officer on the staff of the First Air Force, is seated at the right.

  • Page number: P13
  • Photo number: 23
24. Fuchida had risen to captain by war's end.
  • Page number: P13
  • Photo number: 24
25. After the surrender, a dejected Fuchida returned home and took up farming.

He soon found peace in Christianity.

  • Page number: P14
  • Photo number: 25
26. Distributing scriptures in Hokkaido with American missionary George Vorsheim (left).
  • Page number: P15
  • Photo number: 26
27. With Reverend Billy Graham in November 1952.

Their paths crossed several times, and they became good friends.

  • Page number: P15
  • Photo number: 27
28. With daughter Miyako, wife Haruko, and son Yoshiya (Joe).
  • Page number: P15
  • Photo number: 28
29. Mitsuo Fuchida, the man who led the air attack on Pearl Harbor.

Photo taken around 1964 in the garden of his home.

  • Page number: P16
  • Photo number: 29
Folder 9 Extras, 1940s - 1960s
Folder 10 Negatives, undated
Folder 11 Photocopied, undated

Section: Miracle at Midway

Folder 12 Published Images, 1940s
1. Admiral Chuichi Nagumo, Commander in Chief, First Air Fleet.
  • Page number: P1
  • Photo number: 1
2. Commander Mitsuo Fuchida, Flight leader of Akagi attack on Pearl Harbor.

He did not participate in the Battle of Midway because he had appendicitis.

  • Page number: P2
  • Photo number: 2
3. Admiral Yamamoto, Commander in Chief, combined fleet (Japanese Navy).
  • Page number: P2
  • Photo number: 3
4. Admiral Nobutake Kondo, Commander in Chief, Second Fleet.
  • Page number: P2
  • Photo number: 4
5. Japanese submarine.
  • Page number: P3
  • Photo number: 5
6. Chester W. Nimitz presenting Distinguished Flying Cross to Lt. Cmdr. Clarence Wade McClusky, May 27, 1942.
  • Page number: P4
  • Photo number: 6
7. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet.
  • Page number: P4
  • Photo number: 7
8. Colonel Harold D. Shannon, Base Commander, Sixth Main Defense Battalion.
  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 8
9. RADM Raymond A. Spruance, Commander, Task Force Sixteen.
  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 9
10. RADM Frank Jack Fletcher, Commander, Task Force Seventeen.
  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 10
11. Lt. Howard P. Ady, U.S. Navy reconnaissance pilot, the first to sight Japanese Task Force.
  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 11
12. VADM Tamon Yamaguchi, Commander in Chief, Second Carrier Division.
  • Page number: P6
  • Photo number: 12
13. VADM Ryunosuke Kusaka, Chief of Staff, First Air Fleet.
  • Page number: P6
  • Photo number: 13
14. Midway Commanders at Awards Ceremony, June 17, 1942.

RADM Frank Jack Fletcher, RADM Thomas C. Kinkaid, RADM William W. Smith, RADM Marc A. Mitscher and RADM Robert H. English.

  • Page number: P6
  • Photo number: 14
15. Yamamoto and the Japanese Combined Fleet Staff.
  • Page number: P7
  • Photo number: 15
16. Commander Minoru Genda, Air Officer, First Air Fleet.

He planned the attack on Pearl Harbor and helped plan the Battle of Midway, but did not participate because of pneumonia.

  • Page number: P7
  • Photo number: 16
17. An early photo of the Nautilus, SS 168.
  • Page number: P8
  • Photo number: 17
18. USS Hornet CV-8.
  • Page number: P8
  • Photo number: 18
19. USS Enterprise.
  • Page number: P9
  • Photo number: 19
20. USS Yorktown CV-5.
  • Page number: P9
  • Photo number: 20
21. U.S. Marines landing at Midway.
  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 21
22. Marine Pfc Stanley G. Benson, of Minneapolis, Minn., watches the inimitable antics of Midway's "gooney birds" (Laycan Albatross).

After standing watching their dance for five minutes, Benson walked away shaking his head.

  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 22
23. General view of burning oil tanks on Midway Island after they were hit by Japanese bombs.

Note the gooney birds in the foreground.

  • Page number: P11
  • Photo number: 23
24. Damaged F4F at Midway.
  • Page number: P11
  • Photo number: 24
25. Midway Island, 1942.

Interior of one hangar on Midway Island, damaged during the raid.

  • Page number: P12
  • Photo number: 25
26. A Japanese torpedo scores on Yorktown.
  • Page number: P12
  • Photo number: 25
27. USS Yorktown sinking.
  • Page number: P13
  • Photo number: 26
28. The end draws near for USS Yorktown.
  • Page number: P13
  • Photo number: 27
29. Douglas SBD dive-bombing.
  • Page number: P14
  • Photo number: 28
30. Japanese ship Mikuma damaged.
  • Page number: P15
  • Photo number: 29
31. CA Mogami class damaged.
  • Page number: P15
  • Photo number: 30
32. USS Hammon survivors aboard the USS Bentham.
  • Page number: P16
  • Photo number: 31
Folder 13-14 Extras, 1940s

Section: Nuts! The Battle of the Bulge: The Story and the Photographs

Folder 15-23 Published Images, 1940s
1. Lt. Gen. Courtney H. Hodges, First Army (left).

His command would bear the initial brunt of the German offensive. He is shown here with Maj. Gen. Maurice Rose of the 3rd Armored Division in the Rhine Valley on 24 March 1945.

  • Page number: 1
  • Photo number: 1-1
2. (Left to right) Lt. Gen. Omar N. Bradley, 12th Army Group; Maj. Gen. Leonard T. Gerow, V Corps; General Dwight D. Eisenhower, supreme commander, Allied Expeditionary Force; and Maj. Gen. J. Lawton Collins, VII Corps, in France on 21 July 1944.
  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-2
3. Maj. Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway (left), XVIII Airborne Corps, talks with the staff of the 82nd Airborne Division near Ribera, Sicily in late July 1943.
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-3
4. Lt. Gen. George S. Patton Jr. (standing), Third Army, addresses the officers of the 80th Infantry Division at Ville-au-Val, France, in November 1944. Maj. Gen. Manton S. Eddy, XII Corps commander, sits at left.
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-4
5. Maj. Gen. John Millikin, III Corps, poses for a photographer at Fort McPherson, Georgia, on 13 November 1943.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-5
6. Maj. Gen. Troy H. Middleton, VIII Corps, shown here 10 July 1943 aboard USS Ancon (AGC-4) while that ship was engaged in landing operations off Scoglitti, Sicily.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-6
7. Maj. Gen. Eddy, XII Corps (then commanding the 9th Infantry Division), visiting the front in Tunisia on 8 May 1943.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-7
8. Gen. Carl A. Spaatz, U.S. Strategic Air Forces in Europe.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-8
9. Lt. Gen. James H. Doolittle, Eighth Air Force (Strategic).
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-9
10. Lt. Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, Ninth Air Force.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-10
11. Maj. Gen. Samuel E. Anderson, IX Bombardment Division.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-11
12. Maj. Gen. Paul L. Williams, IX Troop Carrier Command.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-12
13. Maj. Gen. Elwood L. Quesada, IX Tactical Air Command, supporting Hodge's First Army, (left) with Lt. Gen. Bradley.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-13
14. Maj. Gen. Otto P. Weyland, XIX Tactical Air Command, supporting Patton's Third Army.
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-14
15. Adolf Hitler, Führer of the German Reich, shown during Benito Mussolini's visit on 25 July 1944 and shortly after the attempt on Hitler's life.
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-15
16. Generalfeldmarschall Wilheim Keitel, chief of Oberkommando Wehrmacht (OKW), chats with Joseph Goebbels and Martin Bormann.
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-16
17. Generaloberst Alfred Jodi, chief of staff of the German Army (center), briefs Hitler and Hermann Fegelein (Eva Braun's brother-in-law).
  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 1-17
18. Generalfeldmarschall Gerd von Rundstedt (left) Oberbefehisaber West in mid-1944, accompanied by his then-chief of staff Generalleutnant Günther Blumentritt (right).
  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 1-18
19. Adolf Hitler greets Generalfeldmarschall Walter Model, commander of Heeresgruppe B during the Ardennes Offensive.
  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 1-19
20. General der Panzertruppen Hasso von Manteuffel, 5. Panzer-Armee.

Note the two cuff titles on his tunic Afrika and Grossdeutschland.

  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 1-20
21. General der Panzertruppen Heinrich von Lüttwitz, XLVII.

Panzerkorps.

  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 1-21
22. General der Artillerie Walter Lucht, LXVI Armeekorps.
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-22
23. General der Panzertruppen Walter Kröger, LVIII Panzerkorps.
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-23
24. SS- Oberstgruppeenführer Josef Dietrich, 6 Panzer-Armee, at Berschtesgaden, while commander of the 1. SS-Panzer-Division.

On his right pocket hangs the ribbon of the Blood Order, a medal struck for participants in Hitler's 1923 Beer Hall Putsch. (Photo by Eva Braun)

  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-24
25. SS- Gruppenführer Hermann Priess, I. SS-Panzerkorps.
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-25
26. SS- Oberstgruppeenführer Willi Bittrich, II. SS-Panzerkorps, shown here as an Oberführer.
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-26
27. Generalleutnant Otto Hitzfeld, LXVII. Korps.
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-27
28. General der Panzertruppen Erich Brandenburger, 7. Armee.
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-28
29. General der Kavallerie Edwin von Rothkirch, LIII. Korps.
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-29
30. General der Infanterie Franz Beyer, LXXX. Korps.
  • Page number: 12
  • Photo number: 1-30
31. Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring, Luftwaffe commander in chief (center right), on the occasion of the Führer's birthday on 20 April 1944.
  • Page number: 12
  • Photo number: 1-31
32. Generalleutnant Josef Schmidt Luftwaffen-Kommando West.
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 1-32
33. Generalleutnant and Inspekteur der Jadflieger Adolf Galland (left), commander of the Luftwaffe day fighters, confers with Hitler at the Wolf's Lair in East Prussia.
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 1-33
34. Chart -- Comparison of 1939-1943 Infantry Division and Volksgrenadier Division
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 2-1
35. Mauser Kar 98k rifle.
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 2-2
36. American soldiers examine a captured Schmeisser MP40 machine pistol.
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 2-3
37. Pvt. Henry R. Riggan cleans a captured German Strumgewehr 44 (StG44); note MG44 in foreground.
  • Page number: 16
  • Photo number: 2-4
38. Fallschirmjägergewehr 42 (FG42) paratrooper rifle.
  • Page number: 16
  • Photo number: 2-5
39. The MG42 machine gun.
  • Page number: 16
  • Photo number: 2-6
40. Lieutenant Dreyden, U.S. Army Engineers, demonstrates the charging mechanism of a German Stielhandgranate 39 high-explosive stick grenade, or "potato masher."
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-7
41. Personal items and equipment frequently handled and associated with the German soldier -- his helmet, bayonet, cigarettes, and Soldbuch.
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-8
42. The 200,000th German POW captured by the Third Army wears a camouflaged parka, reversible to white.

National Archives 111-SC-202205

  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-9
43. Captured German soldiers in December 1944 display the variety of clothing worn by the rank and file.
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-10
44. Panzerkampfwagen IV medium tank.
  • Page number: 18
  • Photo number: 2-11
45. Panzerkampfwagen V Panther heavy medium tank.
  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 2-12
46. Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausf. E Tiger I heavy tank.
  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-13
47. Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausf. B Tiger II heavy tank.
  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-14
48. Sturmgeschütz III assault gun.
  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-15
49. A snow-covered, wrecked Jagdpanzer IV off the side of a road near Cherain, Belgium.
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-16
50. A captured U.S. tank impressed into German Service.
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-17
51. SdKfz 2 Kettenkraftrad, or half-tracked motorcycle.
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-18
52. Volkswagen Typ 82, Kfz 1 Kübelwagen (right) and an American jeep.
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-19
53. Zugkraftwagen 8t SdKfz 7 medium semi-tracked vehicle, or prime mover.

The "8t" refers to its 8-ton capacity.

  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-20
54. 88mm Pak 43/41.
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-21
55. 75mm Pak 40 antitank gun.
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-22
56. 75mm Pak 97/38 antitank gun with a Solothurn perforated muzzle brake.
  • Page number: 22
  • Photo number: 2-23
57. 105mm K.18 medium gun.
  • Page number: 22
  • Photo number: 2-24
58. 105mm leFH 18 howitzer.
  • Page number: 22
  • Photo number: 2-25
59. 105mm leFH 18/40 howitzer.
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-26
60. 88mm Flak 36 mobile antiaircraft gun.
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-27
61. Nebelwerfer 41 150mm rocket launcher.
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-28
62. Schwerer Granatwerfer 34 80mm medium mortar.
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-29
63. James J. Ballas inspects a captured German Panzerfaust 44mm recoilless antitank grenade launcher.
  • Page number: 24
  • Photo number: 2-30
64. Panzerfaust rocket-propelled projectile with tail assembly.
  • Page number: 24
  • Photo number: 2-31
65. 88mm Raketenpanzerbüchse 54, or Panzerschreck, demonstrated by two American soldiers in St.- Mère-Église, France.
  • Page number: 24
  • Photo number: 2-32
66. Tellermine 42 antitank mine.
  • Page number: 24
  • Photo number: 2-33
67. A German Brückengerät K small box-girder bridge captured near Stavelot, Belgium.
  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 2-34
68. American troops prepare to blow up German "dragon's teeth" tank obstacles in the Siegfried Line.
  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 2-35
69. Luftwaffe fighter aircraft are strewn about an abandoned German airfield at Bad Aibling, Germany.

An Me-109G-14 sits in the foreground, while a Schwarm (flight) of four FW-190A-8s or A-9s is parked across the taxiway.

  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 2-36
70. Sgt. Ray McCrary of Ft. Smith, Arkansas -- the first soldier of the 6th Armored Division to set foot on German soil -- poses with his Garand M1 rifle for a Signal Corps photograph.
  • Page number: 26
  • Photo number: 2-37
71. Tech/4 Fred Parke clutches his M1 carbine in an obviously posed action photo.
  • Page number: 26
  • Photo number: 2-38
72. Pvt. Edwin L. Larsen from the 3rd Armored Division cradles a Thompson M1 submachine gun.
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-39
73. Firing demonstration of the U.S. M3 submachine gun, or "grease gun."
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-40
74. A 5th Infantry Division crew sets up a Browning M1917A1 .30-caliber water-cooled machine gun.
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-41
75. Cpl. William Tamanatini of the 5th Armored Division loads a snow-covered Browning .30-caliber air-cooled machine gun near Sourbrodt, Belgium, on New Year's Day 1945.
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-42
76. Browning .50-caliber M2 machine gun mounted on a jeep.
  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 2-43
77. Mark 11A1 fragmentation grenades lie on the camouflaged hood of a jeep.

Note the M3 submachine gun at right and its extra box magazine on the hood.

  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 2-44
78. Three American soldiers -- one (left) armed with an M1 carbine and two others with M1 rifles employed as launchers for M9 antitank grenades -- gingerly approach the entrance to a building in Stavelot.
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 2-45
79. Two American soldiers demonstrate the camouflage value of the army's snow capes, which unfortunately were not generally available during the early stages of the Ardennes campaign.
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 2-46
80. Wool "booties," an innovation of Col. Banner P. Purdue, commanding officer of the 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division.
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 2-47
81. Men of the 75th Division trudge behind an M4 Sherman tank near Basse, Belgium on January 1945 during the drive to relieve the 82nd Airborne Division.
  • Page number: 30
  • Photo number: 2-48
82. This M4A3 Sherman tank on highway H-4 near Bastogne mounts a 76mm gun, equipped in this case with a muzzle brake.
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 2-49
83. M10 Wolverine tank destroyer supports the drive of the 5th Division through Echternach, Luxembourg, in February 1945.
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 2-50
84. M18 Hellcat tank destroyer.
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 2-51
85. M36 tank destroyer at Dudelange, Luxembourg, 3 January 1945.
  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 2-52
86. A U.S. M3 half-track of the 11th Armored Division prepares for an attack on the outskirts of Bastogne, New Year's Eve, 1944.
  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 2-53
87. A U.S. 155mm self-propelled gun near Echternach.
  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 2-54
88. American gun crewmen of the 770th Field Artillery Battalion dig an emplacement for their 4.5-inch gun near Wilwerdange, Luxembourg.
  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 2-55
89. 105mm howitzer gun crew from the 84th Division prepares to bombard enemy positions near La Roche, Belgium.
  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 2-56
90. Two 90mm antiaircraft guns of the 214th Antiaircraft Artillery (AAA) Battalion point skyward.

Such guns provided much of the heavy, long-range punch required to fend off any possible large-scale German attack from the skies.

  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 2-57
91. A 40mm gun attached to the 633rd AAA Battalion, 80th Infantry Division, keeps watch over the town of Wilts, Luxembourg.

Note the white paint job applied, albeit hurriedly, to this intermediate-range mount.

  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 2-58
92. Quadruple .50-caliber Browning machine-gun mount.
  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 2-59
93. Parabolic radar antenna used by the 129th AAA Battalion near Differdange, Luxembourg.
  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 2-60
94. IFF (Identification, Friend or Foe) antenna set by the 217th AAA Battalion sits in the snow near Bastogne.
  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 2-61
95. An M7 aircraft locator device sits in a sandbagged position of the 217th AAA Battalion.
  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 2-62
96. Two soldiers set up an M2 60mm mortar.
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 2-63
97. Test-firing of an M1 2.36-inch antitank rocket launcher, or bazooka.
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 2-64
98. Carl Listro of the 4th Armored Division applies a coat of white paint to a bulldozer of the 24th Armored Engineer Battalion in Luxembourg.
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 2-65
99. Pvt. Floyd Pilcheo of the 565th AAA Battalion adjusts camouflage netting on a two-and-a-half-ton truck.
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 2-66
100. Tech/4 Luther May of Colorado Springs, Colorado, proudly displays special "mud shoes" of his own invasion that are installed on a jeep of the 981st Maintenance Battalion.
  • Page number: 36
  • Photo number: 2-67
101. Republic P-47 Thunderbolts warm up on the tarmac somewhere in Normandy.
  • Page number: 36
  • Photo number: 2-68
102. Douglas A-20 Havoc
  • Page number: 36
  • Photo number: 2-69
103. North American P-61 Black Widow.
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 2-70
104. Douglas C-47, the workhorse of the IX Transport Command.
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 2-71
105. Map -- Final attack plan for the Ardennes Offensive showing the route of Model's Heeresgruppe B.
  • Page number: 39
  • Photo number: 3-1
106. Chart -- Organization of the 6. Panzer-Armee.
  • Page number: 40
  • Photo number: 3-2
107. SS- Oberführer Wilhelm Mohnke (left), 1. SS-Panzer-Division Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler, shown here greeting Sepp Dietrich.
  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 3-3
108. SS- Standartenführer Hugo Kraas, 12. SS-Panzer-Division Hitlerjugend, shown here as an Obersturmbannführer.
  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 3-4
109. Generalmajor Gerhardt Engel, 12.

Volksgenadier-Division, shown earlier in his career as a Hauptmann.

  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 3-5
110. Oberst Georg Kosmalla, 272. Volksgrenadier-Division, had formerly led the 32.

Infanterie-Division on the northern sector of the Russian Front.

  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 3-6
111. SS- Brigadeführer Heinz Lammerding, 2.

SS-Panzer-Division Das Reich, as a Standartenführer.

  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 3-7
112. SS- Oberführer Sylvester Stadler, 9. SS-Panzer-Division Hohenstaufen, shown here as an Obersturmbannführer.
  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 3-8
113. Chart -- Organization of the 5. Panzer-Armee
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 3-9
114. Oberst Günther Hoffman- Schönborn, 18. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 3-10
115. Oberst Frederich Kittel (here a Generalmajor), 62. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 3-11
116. Generalmajor Siegfried von Waldenburg, 116. Panzer-Division.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 3-12
117. Oberst Meinrad von Lauchert, 2. Panzer-Division.
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 3-13
118. Generalleutnant Fritz Bayerlein, Panzer-Lehr Division, shown here in March 1944 during Operation Margarethe in Hungary.
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 3-14
119. Oberst Heinz Kokott, 26. Volkgrenadier-Division, as commanding officer of the Grenadier-Regiment 377.
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 3-15
120. Chart -- Organization of the 7. Armee
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 3-16
121. Oberst Ludwig Heilmann, 5. Fallschirmjäger-Division.
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 3-17
122. Oberst Erich Schmidt, 352. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 3-18
123. Generalmajor Kurt Moehring, 276. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 46
  • Photo number: 3-19
124. Generalleutenant Franz Sensfuss, 212. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 46
  • Photo number: 3-20
125. Chart -- Organization of the German Reserves.
  • Page number: 46
  • Photo number: 3-21
126. Oberst Otto Remer, führer-Begleit Brigade.
  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 3-22
127. Oberst Hans-Joachim Kahler, führer-Grenadier-Brigade.
  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 3-23
128. Oberst Werner Kolb, 9. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 3-24
129. Generalleutnant Hans-Kurt Höcker, 167. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 3-25
130. Generalmajor Harold von Elverfeld, 9. Panzer-Division.
  • Page number: 48
  • Photo number: 3-26
131. Oberst Theodor Tolsdorff, 340. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 48
  • Photo number: 3-27
132. Oberst Peter Körte, 246. Volksgrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 48
  • Photo number: 3-28
133. Maj. Gen. Walter E. Lauer (right center), commanding general, 99th Infantry Division, presents the Presidential Unit Citation to the 3d Battalion, 195th Infantry Regiment, for its heroic defense during the German breakthrough in the Ardennes.
  • Page number: 49
  • Photo number: 3-29
134. Maj. Gen. Walter M. Robertson, commanding general, 2d Infantry Division, pins the Legion of Merit on Lt. Col. Donald P. Christensen, 2d Infantry intelligence officer. Robertson's longevity was matched by few division commanders, for he led the 2d Infantry from May 1942 through the end of the war.
  • Page number: 49
  • Photo number: 3-30
135. Maj. Gen. Norman S. Cota, commanding general, 28th Infantry Division, chats with General Eisenhower on 9 November 1944.
  • Page number: 50
  • Photo number: 3-31
136. Maj. Gen. Raymond O. Barton, commanding general, 4th Infantry Division.
  • Page number: 50
  • Photo number: 3-32
137. Map -- The Ardennes, 0530, 16 December 1944.
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 3-33
138. Map -- The Rollbahnen Path of I. SS-Panzerkorps to the Meuse.
  • Page number: 52
  • Photo number: 4-1
139. Sturmbannführer Siegfried Müller, SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 25.
  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 4-2
140. Sturmbannführer Herbert Kühlmann, SS-Panzer-Regiment 12, while serving earlier in the war with the 1. SS-Panzer-Division.
  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 4-3
141. Sturmbannführer Gerhard Bremer, SS- Aufklärungs-Abteilung 12, while serving as an Obersturmführer with the 1. SS-Panzer-Division. Bundesarchiv 94/13/2A
  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 4-4
142. Sturmbannführer Bernhard Krause, SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 26.
  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 4-5
143. Obersturmbannführer Joachim Peiper, SS-Panzer-Regiment 1, as a Sturmbannführer.

This photo is from a color portrait taken by official photographer Walter Frentz during Peiper's visit to the führer's headquarters at Wolf's Lair. The original color paint shows dark circles under Peiper's eyes, evidence of either fatigue or stress suffered on the Russian Front or perhaps a vitamin-C deficiency.

  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 4-6
144. Dressed in a camouflage tunic Obersturmbannführer Heinz von Westernhagen, schwere SS-Panzer-Abteilung 501, briefs officers (likely his company commanders) during the Normandy campaign.
  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 4-7
145. Sturmbannführer Rudolf Sandig, SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 2. Bundesarchiv 78/85/21
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 4-8
146. Sturmbannführer Max Hansen, SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 1.
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 4-9
147. Sturmbannführer Gustav Knittel, SS-Panzer- Aufklärungs-Abteilung 1.
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 4-10
148. Hallschlag, Germany. Cold hands in their pockets, prisoners from the U.S. 99th Infantry Division await marching instructions from a Feldgendarm (military policeman) at far right.

Note the Feldgendarmerie gorget hanging around his neck.

  • Page number: 56
  • Photo number: 4-11
149. Under guard and in various states of dress, Americans continue their march through Hallschlag.

A medic and soldier with a white helmet cover -- at far right in the previous photo -- pass before the camera.

  • Page number: 56
  • Photo number: 4-13
150. German Kübelwagens and a horse-drawn vehicle traverse the Siegfried Line between the villages of Scheid and Merlscheid.

Note the array of Höckerhindernisse (literally "hump obstructions"), or dragon's teeth tank obstacles.

  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 4-14
151. While a junior grade officer (likely an engineer) lounges at left, German trucks cross the railway line between Stadtkyll and Malmédy via a Type-J replacement bridge.

Note the camouflage on the top of the truck just entering the bridge's east side.

  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 4-15
152. After riding across the J bridge, the photographer pivots and snaps a picture of the column making its way over the replacement bridge its way over the replacement bridge.

Set up as a prudent precaution, a 20mm Flak 38 antiaircraft gun mount guards the engineers' completed work.

  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 4-16
153. German view of a U.S. P-47 fighter flying at low altitude east of Merisheid.
  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 4-17
154. Kübelwagen from Kampfgruppe Peiper bounces down Rollbahn D past a small church and a U.S. antitank gun near Merlscheid.
  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 4-18
155. The war correspondent backtracks approximately fifteen steps to get a better photograph of the antitank gun.
  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 4-19
156. The American prisoners from the 99th Infantry Division trudge to the rear on the road between Lanzerath and Merischeid.
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 4-20
157. The guard at far right in the previous picture passes before the camera.
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 4-21
158. American prisoners glare at the Kriegsberichter.
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 4-22
159. A shocked American prisoner casts an empty glance at the camera.
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 4-23
160. A Königstiger with its 88mm gun pointing skyward clanks down the road toward Lanzerath while U.S. 99th Division POWs pass in the opposite direction.

Note the checkerboard divisional patch on the sleeve of the private first class at far right.

  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 4-24
161. More POWs trudge down Rollbahn D toward Merlscheid.
  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 4-25
162. German soldiers from the 18. Volksgrenadier-Division, 5. Panzer-Armee, near Roth rummage through the camp of the U.S. 14th Cavalry Group, which was attached temporarily to the 106h Infantry Division.
  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 4-26
163. The correspondent follows two other soldiers into camp.
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 4-27
164. An SS infantryman examines an abandoned U.S. M45 quadruple machine-gun mount belonging to the 413th AAA Battalion, attached to the First Army
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 4-28
165. U.S. enlisted billets at Roth.
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 4-29
166. Abandoned olive-drab tents contrast against the gray December sky.
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 4-30
167. Captured U.S. rations high in a German Kübelwagen.
  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 4-31
168. The ignominy and impersonal brutality of war. Luftwaffe personal loot American corpses at a crossroads in Honsfeld; note the barefoot American at far left.

The German soldier at left appears to be putting something in his pockets.

  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 4-32
169. American casualties from the fighting in Honsfeld facedown in the mud.
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 4-33
170. Triumphant Luftwaffe soldiers take a short breather. Note gas mask canisters carried by the soldiers at right and the bandoliered MG42 ammunition worn by the soldier at left.
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 4-34
171. An SdKfr 251 half-track proceeds through Honsfeld on its way toward Büllingen.
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 4-35
172. American dead near their 76mm antitank gun in Honsfeld.
  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 4-36
173. Likely having just departed Honsfeld, two SS- Kradschützen press forward on their motorcycle.

Note the "cat-eye" cover on the headlamp.

  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 4-37
174. Seated in his Schwimmwagen, a company commander of SWS-Panzer- Aufklärungs-Abteilung 1 ( Kampfgruppe Knittel), possibly Obersturmführer Walter Leidreiter of 2. Kompanie, checks his map.

Note the road sign knocked askew and the American "202 ORDDEPOT FWD" placard placed atop the signpost. The Schwimmwagen was an amphibious version of the Kübelwagen.

  • Page number: 65
  • Photo number: 4-38
175. Vehicles from Kampfgruppe Hansen make a left turn toward the town of Recht. In front is a Steyr 1500 truck.
  • Page number: 65
  • Photo number: 4-39
176. Loaded down with Luftwaffe Fallschrimjäger, Tiger II "222" from Kampfgruppe Peiper clatters northwest and straight through Kaiserbaracke on the way to Ligneuville.
  • Page number: 65
  • Photo number: 4-40
177. Half-tracks of Kampfgruppe Knittel clank through Kaiserbaracke, bound for Ligneuville.
  • Page number: 66
  • Photo number: 4-41
178. Cigar between clenched teeth, Ochsner poses in his Schwimmwagen beside the Malmédy and St. Vith road signs.

Previously published versions of this and the two subsequent photos have often purported (in error) to show Obersturmbannführer Joachim Peiper.

  • Page number: 66
  • Photo number: 4-42
179. A cooperative Ochsner, his driver, and Oberscharführer Persin check their map for the eager Kriegsbericher.
  • Page number: 66
  • Photo number: 4-43
180. Chomping on what is probably one of Ochsner's cigars, the Schwimmwagen driver, a Rottenführer, mugs for the folks at home.

This photo makes it obvious that the man at the left is not Peiper. Peiper had finer features, a thinner face, and a cleft chin.

  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-44
181. Loaded down with a host of Fallschirmjäger, a Tiger II rolls through the vicinity of Ligneuville between Rollbahnen D and E.
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-45
182. Luftwaffe personnel on the Königstiger accept a light for their cigarettes from an Unterscharführer on a motorcycle.
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-46
183. Sturmbannführer Gustav Knittel (right) commander of SS- Aufklärungs-Abteilung 1, and the commander of his staff company, Obersturmführer Heinrich Goltz, checks maps at Vaulx-Richard on the aftermath of 18 December.
  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 4-47
184. A ruddy-faced Goltz glances uneasily at the camera, while Knittel, with binoculars, remains absorbed in his map board.

Knittel's interwoven shoulder boards proclaim his rank of major in the SS. Goltz wears a leather overcoat over a camouflage smock and tunic while Knittel is in a waist-length leather jacket.

  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 4-48
185. Knittel, binoculars in hand, and Goltz gaze up at the sky, likely having heard the arrival of the Panzer spearheads' worst enemy -- the U.S. fighter-bombers of the Ninth Air Force.
  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 4-49
186. Two SS NCOs, an Unterscharführer (left) and a Hauptscharführer (right), help themselves to a box of American cigars.

Both men are in autumn-pattern smocks over field-gray tunics with their collars pulled up and out to display insignia of rank. Note the column of vehicles in the distance.

  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 4-50
187. Infantry atop a Panzerspähwagen SdKfz 234/1 armored car rush westward during the breakthrough of the American lines.

The inverted triangle left of the antenna is a hatch cover that folds down over the 20mm gun turret. Note evergreen camouflage.

  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 4-51
188. How many Gernadiere does it take to move a captured American jeep?

Probably directing the effort, the Hauptscharführer from photo 4-50 stands at center behind the radio-equipped jeep. Note the mix of overcoats and occasional camouflage smocks. A few of the soldiers have turned their hats around backward or pulled their earflaps down.

  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 4-52
189. An SS antitank platoon (see the men in the middles distance) armed with Panzerschrecken or "bazookas," traverses muddy, snow-covered roads during its advance into Belgium.

A Kübelwagen and armored car are just visible in the background at left.

  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 4-53
190. Three SS Grenadiere, two armed with Mausers, press south alongside the road leading to Poteau while a photographer stands outside a barbed-wire fence to record the action.

Another Kreigsberichter stands at right with a motion picture camera. The photographer next will move down past the evergreen tree at far left. Note the abandoned U.S. jeep just beyond the correspondent and the M8 Greyhound armored car at left, barely visible through the fog.

  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 4-54
191. Upon reaching the M8, an SS man climbs through the barbed-wire fence away from the road and snags his coat.
  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 4-55
192. Safely through the fence, two Grenadiere attack some twenty yards south of the road.
  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 4-56
193. The attack moves forward and to the left, toward a small grove of trees.
  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 4-57
194. The Grenadiere press forward past the wrecked jeeps and half-tracks of the 14th Cavalry Group.
  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 4-58
195. An Untersturmführer (left) and Rottenführer rest from the day's labor under a U.S. M8 Greyhound armored car.
  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 4-59
196. Across the road from the M8's safe haven lie other U.S. vehicles, burning and abandoned.
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 4-60
197. The Rottenführer of photo 4-59 retreated up the road some distance so that he may be seen "advancing" to the south.
  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 4-61
198. The Rottenführer emerges from the smoke with his decorations and badges clearly visible.
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 4-73
199. Posing again, the Rottenführer orders an imaginary attack across the road to the northwest.
  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 4-63
200. A jumble of U.S. vehicles clogs the road to Poteau.

Note the machine gun mounted atop the M3 half-track.

  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 4-64
201. The Grenadier at left in photo 4-61 steps into the camera's sight to lean an attack but in the wrong direction, or northeast, back toward Recht.

Although staged, this is a superbly composed shot of an enlisted man and his equipment -- a shelter quarter tied onto his back, an entrenching tool and map case suspended from his belt, and an MP43 (or StG44) assault rifle in his hand.

  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 4-65
202. The infantryman from the previous photo advances toward Poteau from the same position but now in the correct direction.
  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 4-66
203. Looking south toward Poteau, the orientation of the U.S. armored car's turret (right) documents the likely direction of the initial attack that precipitated the American panic.

The marking on the M8 at right, "1A 18C," indicated that the armored car belonged to the 18th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, which was assigned to the First Army. Note the vehicle's tires are equipped with snow chains.

  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 4-67
204. View looking back up the road toward Recht.
  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 4-68
205. A Luftwaffe Unteroffizier armed with a captured M1 carbine advances south along the road embankment.
  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 4-69
206. Recruited as actors, SS infantrymen press to the north, "advancing" the wrong way down the road toward Recht instead of Poteau.
  • Page number: 76
  • Photo number: 4-70
207. A handsome, heavily armed Grenadier tousled hair sticking out from under his helmet, pauses for the camera.
  • Page number: 76
  • Photo number: 4-71
208. Reset and try again.

The soldiers back up for another staged advance toward Recht.

  • Page number: 77
  • Photo number: 4-72
209. Enough acting -- it's time for a smoke break!
  • Page number: 77
  • Photo number: 4-73
210. More cigarettes for the men of the SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 1.
  • Page number: 77
  • Photo number: 4-74
211. SS troops savor the fruits of victory on the road to Poteau. (left to right) SS men 2,1,4,3, and 5.
  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 4-75
212. Their break over, the soldiers begin to advance, this time, at least, in the right direction.
  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 4-76
213. At the photographer's behest, three Grenadiere launch an impressive if very much staged, attack to the north.
  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 4-77
214. SS man 3 gets on last close-up for the home front and one last opportunity to loot American treasure, yielding a tin of rations (as prized as American cigarettes) from an armored car.
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 4-78
215. SS men 2, 1, and 3 accompany the photographer back to his vehicle, "advancing" as they go.
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 4-79
216. SS men 2 and 1 continue the advance against the backdrop of burning American vehicles.
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 4-80
217. Troops move north at the scene of the skirmish depicted in photos 4-54 and 4-55.
  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 4-81
218. Two officers, one of whom is possibly the commander of the company currently in the area, pass the photographer.
  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 4-82
219. The troops stage one last advance to the south while exiting from the scene.
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 4-83
220. A Jagdpanzer IV/70 bypasses the American logjam ahead by moving off onto the south side of the road.
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 4-84
221. Two self-propelled guns are moved into firing position.
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 4-85
222. Obersturmbannführer Otto Skorzeny, 150. Panzer-Brigade and leader of Operation Greif, shown here as a Hauptsturmführer.

This photo is one of several portraits of Skorzeny by Hitler's photographer, Heinrich Hoffmann. Although it has been published several times, this is the first instance where it has been used unretouched, showing Skorzeny's original rank. It was common practice for German war heroes to be "promoted" to their current rank in official photography. Note the prominent Schmisse, or dueling scar, on Skorzeny's left check.

  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 5-1
223. A Sturmgeschütz from Hauptmann Scheff's Kampfgruppe Y that the Americans found abandoned at Geromont.

Note the white star painted on the sides and front. The 291st Combat Engineers removed a bobby trap from the vehicle on 15 January 1945.

  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 5-2
224. After the explosion of an incendiary grenade that Skorzeny's retreating commandos had planted, a booby-trapped SdKfz 250 light half-track from the 150. Panzer-Brigade burns in Regne, Belgium.

As with the brigade's other vehicles, this one was painted olive drab and adorned with the obligatory white star.

  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 5-3
225. An American military policeman (MP) checks the papers of a Belgian civilian near Bastogne on 21 December.
  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 5-4
226. A German soldier, partially clad in American clothing, lies dead in Hotton, Belgium.

The hapless man's dog tags have been pulled out from his tunic, presumably as evidence of his misdeeds.

  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 5-5
227. Found guilty of espionage, Greif commandos (left to right) Wilhelm Schmidt, Günter Billing, and Manfried Pernass await their execution on 23 December.

MPs secure the trio to shooting posts erected near the wall of the building behind. Schmidt cannot look at the firing squad. The bespectacled Billing stares unblinking ahead. Pernass, not net tied to the post, looks to his leader, perhaps for inspiration of encouragement.

  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-6
228. As MPs tie up Pernass, pulling his hands behind him, the convicted spy continues to look expectantly toward Billing.
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-7
229. With Pernass blindfolded and secured to the shooting post, Capt. Joseph Eiser, medical officer of the 633d Clearing Station, affixes a target for the firing squad (a four-inch white circle pinned over the heart).

A grim-faced MP stands close by. Note that are no bullet holes in the wall behind Pernass.

  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-8
230. Started Signal Corps photographer Cpl. Edward A. Norbuth flinches, blurring the photographic image, as the volley from the firing squad crashes into the three prisoners and the wall behind. Four riflemen were assigned to each convicted spy.
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 5-9
231. Gefreiter Wilhelm Schmidt pays the price of a failed mission.
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 5-10
232. Oberst Freiherr Friedrich-August von der Heydte, shown here as a major in 1943.

A veteran parachutist and a certified German hero, von der Heydte commanded I./ Fallschirmjäger-Regiment 3 during the legendary, if ill-fated, airborne assault on Crete.

  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 5-11
233. A Junkers Ju-52 in winter camouflage wrecked when it attempted to land near Asselborn in northern Luxembourg.

Although not associated directly with Stösser, this aircraft was from one of the transport groups supporting the operation. This particular aircraft and another have often been erroneously attributed to Kampfgruppe von der Heydte, when, actually, both aircraft landed in an attempt to service a German field hospital near Asselborn.

  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 5-12
234. An American patrol from Company F, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment, probes the Belgian woodlands in search of German paratroopers on 18 December 1944.
  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 5-13
235. Men of the 3d Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, bide their time near Sourbrodt, Belgium, and wait for their comrades to flush Fallschirmjäger from the woods nearby on 19 December.
  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 5-14
236. Near Sourbrodt, Pvt. Harry N. Newton of Detroit, Michigan, examines supply containers dropped by the Luftwaffe for Operation Stösser paratroopers.
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 5-15
237. American soldiers hold up German parachutes near Sourbrodt on 19 December, mute testimony to Operation Stösser.

Silk parachute material accompanied at least one Ardennes veteran back to the States. Capt. Arthur D. Wenger, chaplain in the 76th Division and father to one of the authors, used the silk to make pajamas. Unfortunately, the dye in the silk had no more staying power than von der Heydte's paratroopers; the pajamas ruined a set of bedsheets the first night Wenger wore them.

  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 5-16
238. Receiving medical aid from Capt. Albert J. Haft and Lt. Col. John R. Woodruff, Oberst von der Heydte lies on a stretcher after he surrender to 99th Infantry Division troops.
  • Page number: 91
  • Photo number: 5-17
239. Map -- Peiper's Fateful "Detour" to Ligneuville
  • Page number: 92
  • Photo number: 5-18
240. This view shows the U.S. convoy's final approach to the Baugnez crossroads, moving up the hill east from Malmédy.

Abandoned vehicles from Battery B, 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion, still litter the side of the road.

  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 5-19
241. View at Baugnez looking due west down the roads that fork (left) to Hedomont and (right) down the hill to Geromont and Malmédy.

The lead vehicle in the U.S. convoy was just about to make a right turn out of the photo at left toward Ligneuville and St. Vith. The truck at right, driven by Sgt. Alan M. Lucas, was actually the second vehicle in the convoy behind Lieutenant Lary's jeep. Note the house at left center, also visible in the previous photo. The ambulance at far right was driven by Pvt. Roy B. Anderson.

  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 5-20
242. This view greeted the vehicles of Kampfgruppe Peiper as they approached Baugnez perhaps one hundred yards from the crossroads.

A shed belonging to Henri LeJoly lies on Highway N23 (the road to Ligneuville) at left. The U.S. column was just behind the line of trees at right.

  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 5-21
243. Commander of I./SS-Panzer-Regiment 1, Sturmbannführer Werner Pötschke, shown earlier in his career as a Hauptsturmführer.

Perhaps a convenient scapegoat, Pötschke was killed in Hungary during March 1945 and thus could tell no tales or provide any rebuttal regarding the massacre.

  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 5-22
244. The killing field.

The Bodarwé café and the U.S. convoy lie some distance behind the photographer. Highway N23, Kampfgruppe Peiper's exit route from the scene, runs toward Ligneuville between the rows of trees at left. Also visible at left is the shed of Henri Lejoly, a Belgian witness to the massacre. National Archives 111-SC-226664, 111-SC-22663, 111-SC-226508, 111-SC-226507

  • Page number: 94-95
  • Photo number: 5-23
245. The burned-out ruins of Madame Adèle Bodarwé's house and café seen from the east.

Peiper's Kampfgruppe would have advanced straight toward the café in the distance behind the trees at center.

  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 5-24
246. Henri Lejoly, civilian witness to the massacre, played a far from heroic role.

In the Bodarwé café at the time, he waved a welcome to the Germans and a little later pointed out the hiding place of some Americans. Even so, the Germans prepared to kill him because he had witnessed the massacre, but after a time let him go. National Archives 111-SC-226667

  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 5-25
247. View from the east window of the house in photos 5-19 and 5-20, with the Bodarwé café at left and the corner of the massacre site at right.
  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-26
248. Highway N23, the road by which Kampfgruppe Peiper continued its advance to Ligneuville.

Note the N23 signpost at left and the shattered branches of the trees, perhaps damaged by German shellfire.

  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-27
249. Men from Company C, 291st Combat Engineers, pose at Baugnez for a group photograph on 16 January 1945.
  • Page number: 98
  • Photo number: 5-28
250. Black soldiers from the 3200th Quartermaster Service Company, led by 2d Lt. F.J. Fraser (second row, far right) National Archives 111-SC-226884
  • Page number: 98
  • Photo number: 5-29
251. An engineer walks past the head of the U.S. convoy toward the massacre field, which is just out of the photograph at left.

Jeeps head down the road to Hedomont, likely carrying more engineers. The "1A-285FOB B-2" marking on the GMC two-and-half-ton truck denotes second vehicle of Battery B, 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion, assigned to the First Army. A Sherman tank stands next to the house in the background.

  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 5-30
252. Using mine detectors, engineers work to locate the slain American soldiers.

This scene is viewed looking south from the road to Hedomont.

  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 5-31
253. After sweeping away the snow, an engineer uncovers the corpse of an American Soldier.
  • Page number: 100
  • Photo number: 5-32
254. The grisly task of locating the American bodies continues, with the second and third bodies uncovered.
  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 5-33
255. Looking northeast toward Bodarwé's café, the photographer snaps the main group of Americans massacred at Baugnez.
  • Page number: 100-101
  • Photo number: 5-34
256. Two American bodies lie approximately one hundred yards from the massacre site.

The view is along south side of the road to Hedomont, looking west toward the crossroads.

  • Page number: 102
  • Photo number: 5-35
257. Two black soldiers carry a victim to a waiting transport vehicle.

Private Anderson's ambulance is at left. National Archives 111-SC-226653

  • Page number: 102
  • Photo number: 5-36
258. An army in retreat.

Vehicles belonging to the 99th Infantry Division withdraw to the west through the town of Wirtzfeld during 17 December 1944. Vehicles markings indicate that the truck is from the 372d Field Artillery Battalion, the 99th Infantry's heavy 155mm battalion. An M10 tank destroyer covers the withdrawal.

  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 5-37
259. Likely from Kampfgruppe Peiper, A PzKpfw IV lies turret upended, put out of action by a tank destroyer in Wirtzfeld -- one hopes by the M10 in photo 5-37!
  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 5-38
260. American infantry of Company G, 23d Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, dig in along an embankment on 17 December.
  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 5-39
261. Men of the 26th Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, move up to meet the German thrusts threatening the town of Büllingen on 17 December.
  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 5-40
262. The 26th Infantry Regiment's 1st Battalion advances to repel German attacks near Butgenbach during 17 December.

Note the destroyed railroad bridge in the background and the sign at left that cautions drivers about craters in the road.

  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 5-41
263. Two Panthers of I./SS-Panzer-Regiment 12 in Krinkelt were eliminated by U.S. bazooka teams on 17 December.

Note that the side armor plating has been blown loose.

  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-42
264. A Hitlerjugend crewman of Panther "126" surrenders to the Americans south of Krinkelt on 17 December.
  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-43
265. On 19 December the remains of a gasoline dumps that the Americans set on fire as a roadblock north of Stavelot.
  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-44
266. Troops of the 325th Gilder Infantry, 82d Airborne Division, move up the road near Werbomont, Belgium, on 20 December in heavy fog.
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 5-45
267. M36 tank destroyers plunge through the gloom near Werbomont in support of the 82d Airborne Division.
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 5-46
268. On 21 December, M10 crewman from the 823d Tank Destroyer Battalion of the 30th Division pose beside their vehicle in Stavelot, Belgium, for Signal Corps photographer V.C. Calvano.

The photo commemorates their destruction of four tanks belonging to Kampfgruppe Peiper.

  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-47
269. Stavelot, 21 December.

A dead SS Leibstandarte infantryman serves as a reminder of Kampfgruppe Knittel's drive through the town on 18 December. The American reoccupied the town three days later.

  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-48
270. An army convoy stops to rest in the snowscape of the Ardennes during 22 December.
  • Page number: 108
  • Photo number: 5-49
271. Snow covered St. Vith during the American effort to retake the town on 24 January.

Allied bombing while the town was in German hands resulted in the moonlike landscape seen here. Few buildings were left intact. National Archives 111-SC-265513

  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 5-50
272. At XVIII Corps headquarters in Harzé, Belgium, Lieutenant General Hodges pins a Silver Star on Brig. Gen. Robert W. Hasbrouck for gallantry in action during the defense of St. Vith. 111-SC-279922
  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 5-51
273. Maj. Gen. William H. Morris (center), commanding general, 10th Armored Division.
  • Page number: 110
  • Photo number: 6-1
274. Guns of the 969th Field Artillery Battalion dig in to support the 101st Airborne Division.

Here men work to unload 155mm howitzer shell cases from the ammunition truck at left.

  • Page number: 111
  • Photo number: 6-2
275. 110th Infantry Regiment "orphans" from Maj. Gen. Norman Cota's 28th Infantry Division share worried expressions in Bastogne on 19 December.

The soldier at left is armed with grenades and an M1 carbine. A broadside addressed to Bastogne's inhabitants is attached to the bulletin board behind the soldiers.

  • Page number: 111
  • Photo number: 6-3
276. Troops of the 506th Parachute Infantry, 101st Airborne Division, move out from Bastogne.
  • Page number: 112
  • Photo number: 6-4
277. Heavy artillery evacuates Bastogne during 20 December.
  • Page number: 112
  • Photo number: 6-5
278. Men of Company B, 630th Tank Destroyer Battalion (sans M36s), armed only with rifles, dig in at their roadblock near Wiltz.
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 6-6
279. Major Rolf Kunkel, Kampfgruppe leader, 26. Volksgrenadier-Division, shown here earlier in the war as a young Leutnant.

Kunkel commanded his division's Aufklärungs-Abteilung 26.

  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 6-7
280. Brig. Gen. Anthony C. McAuliffe, acting commander of the 101st Airborne Division and commander of the Bastogne garrison.
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 6-8
281. Col. Joseph H. Harper, commander of the 327th Gilder Infantry of Bastogne.

He is shown here on 14 December 1951, when he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division.

  • Page number: 114
  • Photo number: 6-9
282. Map -- The siege of Bastogne, 23 December 1944.
  • Page number: 114
  • Photo number: 6-10
283. One of 241 C-47s from IX Troop Carrier Command drops supplies for Bastogne one mile west of the town on 23 December.
  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 6-11
284. C-47 "Ain't Misbehavin'" after crash-landing near Bastogne.

If the occupants of the small camp at right were present during the successful crash-landing, they certainly received the surprise of their lives. Invasion strips, almost weathered away, adorn the C-47's fuselage.

  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 6-12
285. Men of the 101st Airborne, many of them wounded, attended Christmas services even as the city is under siege.
  • Page number: 116
  • Photo number: 6-13
286. Christmas dinner at Bastogne for officers of the 101st Airborne. McAuliffe is seated fourth from the left.

Ned Moore, his acting chief of staff, is seated at the left corner of the table. On the lower right corner sits Joseph Harper. The 101st Fairborn's commander, Maj. Gen. Maxwell Taylor, is not present.

  • Page number: 116
  • Photo number: 6-14
287. Airborne troops jump rope to keep warm on Christmas morning.
  • Page number: 117
  • Photo number: 6-15
288. A most welcome Christmas present falls from a group of nineteen C-47s.
  • Page number: 117
  • Photo number: 6-16
289. Soldiers, likely from Grenadier-Regiment 77, lie dead on the frozen ground where they fell on Christmas Day.
  • Page number: 118
  • Photo number: 6-17
290. Oberst Wolfgang Maucke, Kampfgruppe leader, 15. Panzergrenadier-Division.
  • Page number: 118
  • Photo number: 6-18
291. Bomb damage to Bastogne, 26 December 1944.

After Christmas, Tech/5 Krochka stayed on the job with his box camera, taking this and the next two photographs.

  • Page number: 119
  • Photo number: 6-19
292. In a civilian cemetery the day after Christmas, members of the 101st Airborne Division bury their dead.
  • Page number: 119
  • Photo number: 6-20
293. Two 101st Airborne members drag a parapack of badly needed medical supplies through the snow near Bastogne.
  • Page number: 120
  • Photo number: 6-21
294. Two hapless Belgian civilians totter past a burned-out 10th Armored Division half-track near Bastogne on 27 December.

Combined with the frigid, ice-covered terrain, carcasses of destroyed vehicles convey an air of forlorn desolation in the perimeter surrounding Bastogne.

  • Page number: 120
  • Photo number: 6-22
295. Maj. Gen. Hugh J. Gaffey (right), commanding general, 4th Armored Division.

This photo was taken after the war on 18 May 1945 in Neustadt, Germany. Major General Cota (left) of the 28th Infantry Division seems unimpressed by Gaffney, who by that time commanded the XXIII Corps. Perhaps he was bored by the mundane discussion that centered on the transfer of local German government functions to local units.

  • Page number: 121
  • Photo number: 6-23
296. Map -- The relief of Bastogne, 26 December 1944.
  • Page number: 121
  • Photo number: 6-24
297. Tanks and vehicles of the 4th Armored Division advance toward Bastogne during the breakthrough.

Men line the ditch at right, keeping watch over the convoys' flank.

  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 6-25
298. Clad in snowsuits, armored infantrymen cross a broad, snow-covered plain on 27 December, pressing ever closer to the Bastogne garrison.
  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 6-26
299. Clattering past a column of POWs, an M3 half-track from the 4th Armored Division races toward Bastogne.

The M3 mounts a water-cooled .30-caliber Browning machine gun.

  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 6-27
300. Signal Corps photographer Pfc. D. R. Ornitz takes several well-composed, if grisly, photographs of American dead near Chaumont, Luxembourg, as Bastogne-bound half-tracks of the 4th Armored Division clatter toward their objective.

Though taken from slightly different angles and locations, these photographs together provide a wide-angle view of the road.

  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 6-28
301. Ornitz crosses the road, looks back, and takes a picture of another American corpse as an M3 rolls toward Bastogne.

The jeep at left center was likely disabled in the Battle of Chaumont, the same action that felled the Americans nearby.

  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 6-29
302. With Bastogne relieved, vehicles from the 4th Armored Division sit parked in its main square on 28 December.
  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 6-30
303. Lieutenant General Patton chats with Brigadier General McAuliffe after awarding him the Distinguished Service Cross on 28 December.

To their left is Lt. Col. Steve Chapuis, hero of the battle of Champs east of Bastogne. He, too, would soon receive the Distinguished Service Cross.

  • Page number: 125
  • Photo number: 6-31
304. Troops of the 101st Airborne march out of Bastogne on 29 December to do battle with the Germans somewhere on the city's perimeter.
  • Page number: 125
  • Photo number: 6-32
305. On 30 December, a 4th Armored Division tank retriever prepares to haul out a Sherman tank disabled by German shells outside Bastogne.
  • Page number: 125
  • Photo number: 6-33
306. Burned-out buildings surround the debris-strewn main square in Bastogne on 30 December.

American MPs erected a new sign warning against leaving vehicles unattended. Note the disabled M3 half-track at left.

  • Page number: 126
  • Photo number: 6-34
307. Bombed-out citizens of Bastogne huddle together in a horse-drawn wagon, which likely also carries most of their possessions.
  • Page number: 126
  • Photo number: 6-35
308. Guards of the 502d Parachute Infantry Regiment turn back civilians attempting to exit the Bastogne pocket northwest of the city on 30 December.
  • Page number: 127
  • Photo number: 6-36
309. Tanks and armored infantry of the 6th Armored Division attack German troops north of Bastogne on 31 December.
  • Page number: 127
  • Photo number: 6-37
310. Alongside members of the 101st Airborne, soldiers of the 777th AAA Battalion, which was attached to the 6th Armored Division, struggle to keep warm beside a fire on the outskirts of Bastogne on 31 December.

An M3 half-track is behind them.

  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 6-38
311. Combat engineers from the 26th Armored Engineer Battalion, 6th Armored Division, began the task of clearing rubble from Bastogne's debris-choked streets on 1 January.
  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 6-39
312. On New Year's Day, Cpl. Martin Konopka and Pvt. Charles Kelly of the 489th AAA Battalion, 4th Armored, display a wild boar as proof that they could hit their mark, albeit on a ground target.

But it was the mayor's shotgun that made the kill.

  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 6-40
313. A Defunct convoy of derelict gasoline trucks litters the roadside on one approach to Bastogne.
  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 6-41

Box Photo 9
Folder 1-3 Published Images, 1944 - 1960s
314. On 23 December 1944 in Manhay for the first time since the opening of the German offensive, troops of the 3d Armored Division see the contrails of Allied aircraft.
  • Page number: 130
  • Photo number: 7-1
315. An A-20 Havoc of the 115th Photo Reconnaissance Squadron used flash and flares to take this aerial photo showing a convoy of German vehicles north of Houffalize, Belgium, on the night of 26 December.
  • Page number: 131
  • Photo number: 7-2
316. Ninth Air Force mechanics work on a P-38 fighter at a base in Belgium.

The two men at right are rigging pipes from a heater to warm up the P-38's right engine.

  • Page number: 131
  • Photo number: 7-3
317. Bearing cheery holiday greetings for the führer, bombs await clear weather for delivery in time for Christmas.
  • Page number: 131
  • Photo number: 7-4
318. P-47 Thunderbolts of the 365th Fighter Group at a Ninth Air Force base in Belgium warm up and await takeoff for missions against German armored columns.

Two aircraft are taking off in the distance.

  • Page number: 132
  • Photo number: 7-5
319. One more FW-190 and Luftwaffe pilot would not be available for the final defense of the Fatherland.

Maj. James Dalglish of the 354th Fighter Group scores over the Bulge.

  • Page number: 132
  • Photo number: 7-6
320. A German ammunition truck bound for the front explodes in a blinding flash under the guns of Lt. Robert D. Law of Colorado Springs, Colorado.
  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 7-7
321. Lt. Frank W. Chwateck attack four German tanks that attempted to negotiate snow-covered roads at a Belgian crossroads on December.

In the center frame, Chwateck's incendiary .50-caliber bullets have just hit the lead tank.

  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 7-8
322. A German Brückengerät K replacement bridge sits in the icy waters of a stream near Stavelot, Belgium, after it collapsed under the weight of a Jagdpanzer IV, which lies in the water at the left. While the USAAF made invaluable contributions during the Ardennes Offensive, destroying this German replacement bridge, as claimed in the Signal Corp's caption, is not one of them.
  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 7-9
323. Maj. Gen. Willard S. Paul (right), commanding general, 26th Infantry Division, chats with Lieutenant General Patton (center) and Maj. Gen. Manton Eddy (left) in France on 3 November 1944.
  • Page number: 110
  • Photo number: 7-34
324. Patton and Maj. Gen. Horace l. McBride, commanding general, 80th Infantry Division, enjoy an animated discussion.
  • Page number: 134
  • Photo number: 7-11
325. Humbled Grenadiere from the 914. Grenadier-Regiment, 352. Volksgrenadier-Division, line up in front of their captors near Merzig, Luxembourg, on 24 December, after their battle with the U.S. 319th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division.
  • Page number: 134
  • Photo number: 7-12
326. The day after Christmas, American soldiers from the 702d Tank Battalion inspect a PzKfpw V Panther heavy tank from the führer-Grenadier-Brigade.

It was knocked out during heavy fighting at Heiderscheid, Luxembourg. Photographer H. Miller, possibly a German armor enthusiast, took this and the following two photographs.

  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 7-13
327. Curious Americans in Heiderscheid inspect a Sturmgeschütz IV that was abandoned by the führer-Geranadier-Brigade.

One man sits atop, one peers down the muzzle, and a third, Lt. L.M. Barrington, peeps into the driver's compartment.

  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 7-14
328. Another Sturmgeschütz and a wrecked SdKfz 251 half-track stand on the outskirts of Heiderscheid.

The torn body of a Fuhrer-Grenadier lies close by at right.

  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 7-15
329. POW Emil Gronen likely from the führer-Grenadier-Brigade, receives medical attention from the army nurse Lillian Wilson in the 60th Field Hospital in Heiderscheid.
  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 7-16
330. An 81mm mortar crew the 101st Infantry Regiment, 26th Infantry Division, hurls mortar rounds at German positions near Bavigne, Luxembourg, on New Year's Eve.

Soldiers with ready rounds in hand stand by at right and left, while a private first class at far right communicates with a spotter. The man standing guard at the rear with an M1 carbine illustrates how that lighter weapon was typically used.

  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 7-17
331. On 1 January infantrymen in snowsuits from the 11th Regiment, 5h Infantry Division, press German positions in the Bulge's southern sector near Haller, Luxembourg.
  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 7-18
332. A 105mm howitzer from the 19th Field Artillery Battalion, 5th Infantry Division, stands ready in a well-dug-in and camouflaged position near Haller.

The smokestack rising through the last camouflage net at left likely provides the barest minimum of creature comforts to the gun crew.

  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 7-19
333. German casualties of the 212. Volksgrenadier-Division on frozen fields south of Echternach on 26 December.
  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 7-20
334. Advancing over frigid snow-covered hills near Bettange, troops of the 35th Division advance against the 5. Fallschirmjäger-Division and elements of the 15. Panzergrenadier-Division on 28 December.
  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 7-21
335. Maj. Gen. Paul W. Baade, commanding general, 35th Infantry Division.
  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 7-22
336. On 31 December, men from the 345th Infantry Regiment, 87th Infantry Division, in Moircy, southeast of St. Hubert, Belgium.
  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 7-23
337. Maj. Gen. Frank L. Culin, commanding general, 87th Infantry Division.
  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 7-24
338. Humain, Belgium, on 28 December.

A U.S. 76mm antitank gun lies knocked out, a victim in the battle for Humain.

  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 7-25
339. Three Panthers from Generalmajor von Elverfeld's 9.

Panzer-Division, destroyed by the U.S. 2d Armored Division, rest in silent formation near Humain.

  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 7-26
340. Pvt. Riley Tillman stands ready to ply his trade of blowing up bridges near Marche, Belgium, in the event of a German breakthrough during 30 December.

Tillman was a member of the 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, assigned to the 84th Infantry Division.

  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-27
341. On 30 December, a camouflaged M10 tank destroyer assigned to the 84th Infantry Division lies in wait for unsuspecting German tanks from the 116. Panzer-Division in Hotton, Belgium.
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-28
342. Knocked out by units of the 75th Division, a Panther from Hitlerjugend sits at the Belgian crossroads of Grandmenil on 30 December.
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-29
343. The battered town of Stavelot in the Amblève River valley as seen from the positions of the 30th Infantry Division and looking east across the river to those of the 18. Volksgrenadier-Division on the bluffs beyond, on 30 December.
  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 7-30
344. Last rites for the victims of German atrocities in Stavelot. Massacre victims would be buried in a common grave on 30 December.
  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 7-31
345. Sturmbannführer Ernest Krag, SS- Aufklärungs-Abteilung 2, 2. SS-Panzer-Division.

His Kampfgruppe led the way to Manhay.

  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 7-32
346. Maj. Gen. James A. Gavin, commanding general, 82nd Airborne Division.

His division would anchor the American's left flank against Bittrich's attack.

  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 7-33
347. Sturmbannführer Eberhard Telkamp, SS-Panzer-Regiment 9, 9. SS-Panzer Division.

His tank would spearhead the attack against the U.S. 82d Airborne Division.

  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 7-34
348. Waiting for German armor to come clattering down the road, a 3d Armored Division soldier guards the approaches to Manhay with his rocket launcher on 23 December.

He would have only one day to wait.

  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 7-35
349. Tanks of the 116. Panzer-Division-PzKpfw IV "611" at left and a Panzer at right -- undergo scrutiny by men of the 3d Armored Division at Hotton on 26 December, three days after turning back a German attack on the town.
  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 7-36
350. A young SS private, probably from Das Reich, undergoes interrogation in Manhay on December, one day before his comrades "liberated" the town, albeit temporarily.
  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 7-37
351. With tousled hair and a head injury, the infantryman casts a troubled, uncertain stare at photographer Lt. S. Noble.
  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 7-38
352. Another SS Grenadier, this one a Sturmmann, seems somewhat indifferent to Noble.
  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 7-39
353. Manhay after the Americans recaptured it, shown on 30 December.
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-40
354. Pvt. Clarence Severtsgaar scans the horizon from the turret of his M36 tank destroyer near Manhay on 27 December.

The photo shows clearly the open-top turret common to all U.S. tank destroyers. Ration boxes are strewn around the dug-in position. From the shadows and the bright sunlight, it is apparent that the tank destroyer has set up on the edge of the woods.

  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-41
355. In a wooded area near the Bastogne corridor in the early day of January 1945, Pvts. John P. MacFarlane and Loyd W. Lockwood of the 35th Infantry Division man a .30-caliber Browning machine gun.
  • Page number: 145
  • Photo number: 8-1
356. The lonely grave of an anonymous German paratrooper of the 5. Fallschrimjäger-Division lies in the woods east of Bastogne in a sector that the U.S. 30th Division retook.

Note the paratrooper's helmet, his Mauser rifle, and the crude wooden cross.

  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 8-2
357. In position with the 11th Armored Division, troops relax after a meal in a barn near Odenville, Belgium.

One soldier (center) appears to be writing a letter home.

  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 8-3
358. Taken prisoner by the 50th Armored Infantry Battalion of the 6th Armored Division in Magaret, two young men from the 12. SS-Panzer-Division cast vacuous glances at their captors.

Note the Grenadier at right has tucked his tunic into trousers held up by a knotted cord in lieu of a belt.

  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 8-4
359. An American soldier searches members of the 12. SS-Panzer-Division.

The Sturmmann (center) wears the Hilterjugend divisional cuff title on his tunic. His SS sleeve eagle has been removed, perhaps by an American souvenir hunter.

  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 8-5
360. Pvt. Forrest Parker and Sgt. Elmar Hurar indulge in the much-welcomed mindless diversion of the Sunday comics in the 26th Infantry's sector at Goesdorf, four miles south of Wiltz, Luxembourg.

A .30-caliber machine gun is in position behind the two soldiers. In the Dick Tracy panel facing the camera, Tracy rushes into Gravel Gertie's shack in search of "The Brow."

  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 8-6
361. An M10 tank destroyer of the 712th Tank Battalion, 90th Infantry Division, advances past the snow-covered ruins of Berle, Luxembourg, on 12 January.
  • Page number: 148
  • Photo number: 8-7
362. On 14 January, graves registration personnel from the 26th Infantry Division collect both American and German dead in the aftermath of fighting near Wiltz, Luxembourg.

Note the chains on the rear tires of the jeep.

  • Page number: 148
  • Photo number: 8-8
363. An aerial view of Wiltz on 22 January after its recapture by the 26th Infantry Division and the 6th Cavalry Group.
  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 8-9
364. German graves in Wiltz on 22 January.

A victim's helmet rests atop one of the crosses.

  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 8-10
365. Americans detain a captured German medic.

Clad in a red-cross, he carries his supplies in two U.S. field glass cases.

  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 8-11
366. Two German Opel trucks are upended along a roadside near Marbourg, Luxembourg on 31 January.

The second truck is at left, back in the fog. Note the first truck's Wehrmacht-Heer license plate, identifiable by its "WH-" prefix.

  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 8-12
367. Pvt. Joseph Klem of the 357th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division, prepares to munch on his noonday ration at Binsfeld, Luxembourg.
  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 8-13
368. On 6 February, Signal Corps photographer Tech/4 Aaron Lubitsch pauses alongside a building bearing a German slogan in Troisvierges, Luxembourg, about eight miles due east of Houffalize Belgium.
  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 8-14
369. In Clervaux, Luxembourg, a brand-new Panther tank sits intact, out of gas, and with turret hatch open.
  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 8-15
370. A thaw during the first week of February inundates a German military cemetery at Clervaux.

Many of the crosses have fallen askew in the soft, wet earth.

  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 8-16
371. A Sherman tank of the 2d Armored Division passes a snow-covered PzKpfw V Panther in a roadside ditch near Grandmenil, Belgium.
  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 8-17
372. German army POWs line up with Soldbücher in hand after the 82d Airborne Division captured them near Basse-Bodeux, Belgium on 3 January, just as the U.S. counter-offensive got under way.

The soldier in the front of the line wears an Army decal on his helmet.

  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 8-18
373. This young infantryman, another prisoner captured by the 82d Airborne near Fosse on 4 January, wears a snowsuit with a waist belt and 7.92mm ammunition pouches.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 8-19
374. Sherman tanks from the 3d Armored Division pause in their advance along the northern edge of the Bulge in the Manhay-Houffalize sector near Baraque de Fraiture on 7 January and wait for a German tank to be cleared from the road ahead.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 8-20
375. Maj. Gen. Maurice Rose, in command of the 3d Armored Division.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 8-21
376. Brig. Gen. Cliff Andrus, commanding general, 1st Infantry Division.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 8-22
377. Captured by 1st Division soldiers during the fighting near Steinbach, a Luftwaffe Obergefreiter from the 3. Fallschirmjäger-Division glares at Signal Corps photographer Sgt. Bill Augustine in Weywertz, Belgium on 15 January.
  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 8-23
378. Another Obergefreiter is far less appreciative of Augustine's photographic efforts, shielding his face from the camera.

An Unteroffizier stands in the background at right.

  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 8-24
379. An SS private surrenders to the 3d Armored Division.

The Grenadier wears a familiar complement of uniform parts -- service tunic, camouflage smock, and greatcoat.

  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 8-25
380. Foy, Belgium, just after the arrival of the elements 506th Parachute Infantry, 101st Airborne, on 16 January.

Horses have strayed into the road at right. An ambulance from the medical unit is parked beside the horses' water trough at left.

  • Page number: 155
  • Photo number: 8-26
381. Four miles east of Malmédy near Faymonville on 16 January, a T1E1 mine exploder works to clear the road of mines, while an M3 half-track gingerly follows close behind.
  • Page number: 155
  • Photo number: 8-27
382. Army photographer Garrell approaches the town of Houffalize, Belgium, from the west on January.
  • Page number: 156
  • Photo number: 8-28
383. Garrell rides down the main road into shell-torn Houffalize.

The sign board warns advancing soldiers that the road ahead is unmarked.

  • Page number: 156
  • Photo number: 8-29
384. Racing over snow-covered roads, tanks of the 7th Armored Division push on toward St. Vith.
  • Page number: 157
  • Photo number: 8-30
385. Air liaison officers of the Ninth Air Force -- (left to right) Maj. Albert Triers, Maj. William Abbot Jr., and 1st Lt. Richard Zinkowski -- inspect a PzKpfw V, one of many tanks and other vehicles that the IX Tactical Air Command and the advancing 7th Armored Division had destroyed.

The Panther seems to be parked in front of Hôtel des Ardennes, as if would-be German guests had stopped to check in.

  • Page number: 157
  • Photo number: 8-31
386. Soldiers of the 7th Armored Division guard three German officers captured on the way into St. Vith.

The officers at left are rather neatly attired and relatively well turned out, while the man at right appears somewhat disheveled, wearing a crumpled, dirty snowsuit.

  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 8-32
387. Snowsuit-clad members of a rifle squad (possibly assigned to the Sherman tank in the background) from the 7th Armored Division warily observe the windows above them in the debris-strewn streets of St. Vith on 23 January.

The wall at left appears ready to topple onto the men below.

  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 8-33
383. Advancing through heavy snow and incoming German shellfire, infantrymen of the 75th Division move forward near St. Vith on 23 January.
  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 8-34
384. On 27 January, American troops pass a PzKpfw IV-chassised Flakpanzer Wirbelwind that was abandoned Kampfgruppe Peiper near Buchholtz during the first days of the offensive.
  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 8-35
385. Men of the 325th Glider Infantry, 82d Airborne Division, commit themselves to the final advances on Herresbach on 28 January, the date of the village's liberation.

The men drag a heavily laden ammunition sled through the snow. While some have on snowsuits, others do not.

  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 8-36
386. A Sherman tank of the 740th Tank Battalion, attached to the 82d Airborne only the week before, crunches through heavy snow near Herresbach.
  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 8-37
387. Soldiers trudge one behind the other in boot-deep snow just prior to the fall of Herresbach on 29 January.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 8-38
388. Snow drifts over the pews and floor of a shattered church in Krinkelt, Belgium, on 1 February, retaken earlier by the 2d Infantry Division.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 8-39
389. On 3 January, machine gunners of the 10th Infantry, 4th Armored Division, cover an advancing tank in the Bastogne corridor.

Note the photographer's shadow at right, cast by the early morning light.

  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 8-40
390. An ambulance of the 501st Medical Battalion, 101st Airborne Division, lies wrecked near the outskirts of Bastogne, another victim of a German artillery shell about 9 January.
  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 8-41
391. Aerial photo of the village of Bizory, northeast of Bastogne, as the U.S. 6th Armored Division advances.

Note the telltale tank tracks in the snow.

  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 8-42
392. Maj. Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor turns over control of Bastogne to VIII Corps commander Major General Middleton on 18 January.

An MP sergeant with a camera stands at left.

  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 8-43
393. Major General Taylor, commanding general, 101st Airborne Division.
  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 8-44
394. Maxwell Taylor's receipt for Bastogne -- battered but serviceable and "disinfected."
  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 8-45
395. Upended vehicles of Team Cherry, wrecked during the siege of Bastogne, have been pushed into a ditch on the road to Longvilly northeast of the city.
  • Page number: 164
  • Photo number: 8-46
396. Supply convoy of the 90th Infantry Division rolls through the streets of Bastogne on 22 January.

This picture, taken by Sgt. C. F. Anders, is perhaps the photograph most frequently associated with Bastogne and the Battle of the Bulge.

  • Page number: 164
  • Photo number: 8-47
397. A soldier suffering compound fractures in both legs from gunshot and shrapnel wounds awaits the attention of surgeons in the 111th Evacuation Hospital in Luxembourg.
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-48
398. Army medical personnel of the 51st Field Hospital operate in primitive conditions near Aisne, Belgium.

They are (left to right) Tech/4 James Polite, Lt. Helen Johnson, and Capt. I.R. Hayman. Gas bottles and anesthesia equipment sit in the foreground.

  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-49
399. Battle casualties from the Bulge crowd a post-operative tent near Aisne.

The pyramidal tent offers shelter to patients from whom quarters are not yet available.

  • Page number: 166
  • Photo number: 8-50
400. At a medical clearing station near Ettelbruck, Luxembourg, a Catholic chaplain from the 5th Infantry Division -- Maj. Harold O. Prudell -- administers last rites on 29 January to a soldier who was seriously wounded along the Bulge's southern shoulder.
  • Page number: 166
  • Photo number: 8-51
401. In a POW stockade near Passau, Germany, on 7 May 1945, battered German soldiers stand in line after being identified as suspects in the Baugnez massacre.

None of the men here, however, match photos of any defendants in the Malmédy trial. Their presence in Kampfgruppe Peiper would be surprising in any case, as most seem to be decidedly middle-ages.

  • Page number: 167
  • Photo number: 9-1
402. The flag-draped Malmédy Massacre Memorial at Baugnez, Belgium -- seen here on 27 July 1945 -- was a temporary structure, molded out of concrete.
  • Page number: 168
  • Photo number: 9-2
403. On 9 April 1946, six of the massacre's survivors gather in front of the concrete monument (left to right): Virgil R. Lary, Kenneth Ahrens, Homer D. Ford, Carl R. Daub, Kenneth E. Kingston, and Samuel Dobyns.
  • Page number: 168
  • Photo number: 9-3
404. The cover of the book containing the charges and evidence for the Malmédy trial.

Note the typed list of defendants immediately above.

  • Page number: 169
  • Photo number: 9-4
405. The building at Dachau where the General Military Government Court convened on 16 July, the day sentences for seventy-three of the defendants were announced.
  • Page number: 169
  • Photo number: 9-5
406. The trial's antagonists -- Col. Willis M. Everett Jr., chief defense counsel, and Lt. Col. Burton F. Ellis, trial judge advocate -- in animated conversation during a court recess on 26 June 1946.
  • Page number: 170
  • Photo number: 9-6
407. Former 6. Panzer-Armee commander Josef Dietrich, the highest-ranking defendant, stands to receive his number -- 11.
  • Page number: 170
  • Photo number: 9-7
408. Romanian-born Volksdeutscher ex-Sturmmann Georg Fleps receives number 14 from the court.
  • Page number: 171
  • Photo number: 9-8
409. First Lieutenant Lary declares, "This is the man (Fleps) that fired the first two pistol shots into the American prisoner of war."
  • Page number: 171
  • Photo number: 9-9
410. Ex-Sturmmann Hans-Erick Lichtwarck of 2./SS-Panzer-Regiment 1 testifies for the prosecution and submits to cross-examination by Dr. Hans Hertkorn (standing) of the defense counsel on 21 May. To the left of Hertkorn is Hans Siptrott (number 60), Georg Fleps's tank commander.

Immediately behind the woman seated at the left end of the defense counsel's table is Joachim Peiper, wearing a pair of sunglasses.

  • Page number: 172
  • Photo number: 9-10
411. On 27 May, 1st Lt. William R. Perl -- war crimes and Malmédy investigator, who interrogated many of the accused -- answers questions posed by Lieutenant Colonel Ellis (left), trial judge advocate.

A translator sits at center.

  • Page number: 173
  • Photo number: 9-11
412. Kurt Framm, ex- Untersturmführer and adjutant an Werner Pötschke's staff offers testimony on 27 May on behalf of the prosecution.
  • Page number: 173
  • Photo number: 9-12
413. Ex. Pfc. Samuel Dobyns, former ambulance drivers for the 575th Ambulance Company, 99th Infantry Division, points out the crossroads at Baugnez where he witnessed the massacre of members of the 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion.
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 9-13
414. At the behest of the defense, Dobyns scans the seventy-four defendants to find the man who saved him from being shot at Baugnez, Defendant number 1 and the trial's official namesake, Valentin Bersin, sits on the first row of defendants.
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 9-14
415. Capt. Rafael Schumacker of the prosecution team show ex-Sgt. Kenneth Ahrens an overlay map of the massacre site.
  • Page number: 175
  • Photo number: 9-15
416. Ahrens demonstrates how he surrendered to elements of Kampfgruppe Peiper.
  • Page number: 175
  • Photo number: 9-16
417. Homer D. Ford, an ex-MP who was on duty at Baugnez at the time of the massacre, relates his story to the court.
  • Page number: 175
  • Photo number: 9-17
418. Called to testify for the defense, Gerhardt Engel -- former commanding general of the 12. Volksgrenadier-Division during the Ardennes Offensive-testifies on 19 June.

Note that while the SS prisoners were not permitted to wear any insignia, Engel's tunic still retains its red general officer collar tabs and epaulets.

  • Page number: 176
  • Photo number: 9-18
419. An emaciated Hermann Priess, former commander of the I. SS-Panzerkorps, takes the stand and undergoes cross-examination by Morris Elowitz, the U.S. civilian assistant trial judge advocate.
  • Page number: 177
  • Photo number: 9-19
420. The star of the Malmédy trial, ex- Obersturmbannführer Joachim Peiper takes his seat on the witness stand on 21 June.
  • Page number: 177
  • Photo number: 9-20
421. Defendants on the officers' end of the dock listen to Dr. Otto Leiling (German defense counsel) translate Colonel Everett's concluding appeal for the defense.

Front row, left to right: Dietrich (hidden by Leiling), Krämer, Priess, Peiper, and Friedrich Christ (number 7). Other Kampfgruppe company commanders are (second row immediately above Peiper) Vernoni Junker (number 29), commander of 6./SS-Panzer-Regiment 1, (third row) Erich Rumpf (number 54), commander of 9. Pionier-Kompanie, and (top row, directly above Krämer) Heinz Tomhardt (number 67), commander of 11./SS-Panzer-Regiment 1.

  • Page number: 178
  • Photo number: 9-21
422. Following a recess on June wives of defendants Dietrich and Peiper return to the courtroom to hear the court's verdict.
  • Page number: 178
  • Photo number: 9-22
423. Dietrich and Krämer sit prepared to take notes during the final court session prior to sentencing on 16 July.

Contemplating his fate on the third row, Gustav Knittel stares at Signal Corps photographer Pfc. Harry Bergmann. Note that Dietrich and Krämer have almost no shoelaces, most likely an anti-suicide measure.

  • Page number: 179
  • Photo number: 9-23
424. Spectators at the court in Dachau await the sentencing that would conclude the trial.
  • Page number: 179
  • Photo number: 9-24
425. While Colonel Everett looks on at right, Priess receives a sentence of twenty years.
  • Page number: 180
  • Photo number: 9-25
426. Oswald Siegmund (number 58) leaves the courtroom at Dachau after being sentenced to death by hanging. National Archives 111-SC-249319
  • Page number: 181
  • Photo number: 9-26
427. The last three defendants -- (left to right) Paul Zwigart, Otto Wickmann, and Erich Werner -- await their respective sentences of death, ten years and life imprisonment.
  • Page number: 181
  • Photo number: 9-27
428. Signal Corps photographer Genot visits Bastogne on 2 April 1950 and takes a photo (undoubtedly with a deliberate comparison in mind) from the same vantage point as photo 8-47.

Five intervening years appear to have erased most of the war's damage.

  • Page number: 181
  • Photo number: 9-28
429. In July 1950, the people of Belgium dedicated the Bastogne Memorial to the memory of all American troops killed in the Battle of the Bulge.
  • Page number: 182
  • Photo number: 9-29
430. Maj. Gen. Anthony McAuliffe delivers a speech to the people of Bastogne, July 1950.
  • Page number: 182
  • Photo number: 9-30
431. McAuliffe places a wreath of flowers commemorating "Bastogne Day" in 1955.
  • Page number: 182
  • Photo number: 9-31
432. On 14 June 1954, Belgian Lt. Henri LaFaut examines the turret of a Sherman tank mounted in a pedestal near Bastogne.
  • Page number: 183
  • Photo number: 9-32
433. The American Military Cemetery and Memorial at Ardennes, Belgium, dedicated on 11 July 1960.
  • Page number: 183
  • Photo number: 9-33
434. The American eagle watches over the fallen. 111-SC-578277
  • Page number: 184
  • Photo number: 9-34
435. American defenders of Belgium at peace. 111-SC-578274
  • Page number: 184
  • Photo number: 9-35
Folder 4-7 Extras, 1940s - 1960s
Folder 8 Photocopied, undated

Section: Rain of Ruin: A Photographic History of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Folder 9 -16 Published Images, 1930s - 1945
1. The mushroom cloud continues its climb toward the stratosphere. See 5-24
  • Page number: Front Cover
  • Photo number: 1
2. (clockwise from) Fat Boy 5-4, Nagasaki 5-91, injured woman 8-6, the Enola Gay 3-12.
  • Page number: Back Cover
  • Photo number: 2
3. Dr. Albert Einstein.
  • Page number: 1
  • Photo number: 1-1
4. President Franklin D. Roosevelt (center), with Stalin (left) and Churchill (right) at the Yalta Conference during early February 1945.
  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-2
5. Dr. Vannevar Bush.
  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-3
6. Dr. John B. Conant, president of Harvard University.
  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-4
7. Dr. Karl Compton (third from left) at the first meeting of the War Resources Board on August 17, 1939.

Other members are, seated (l-r): Dr. Harold S. Moulton, acting secretary of the Navy; Charles Edison; board chairman Edward R. Stettinius; and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Louis Johnson. Standing: Commander Anton B. Anderson, USN; Admiral Harold R. Stark, USN; Compton; John L. Pratt; General George C. Marshall, USA; and Colonel Harry K. Rutherford, USA.

  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-5
8. Dr. Arthur Compton.
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-6
9. Dr. Ernest O. Lawrence (left), Dr. Enrico (center), and Isidor I. Rabi.
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-7
10. Henry L. Stimson, secretary of war, was directly responsible to the president for the entire atomic bomb undertaking.
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-8
11. Major General Leslie R. Groves, in executive charge of the Manhattan Project.
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-9
12. Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer.
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-10
13. The rear entrance to the Alamogordo, New Mexico, test site during July 1945. Note watchtower at left.
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-11
14. A lonely MP stands watch in one of the watchtowers at the test site.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-12
15. Main camp at Alamogordo.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-13
16. Oak Ridge, Tennessee, seen from the “Oliver Spring” Gate

An anonymous observer said of this entrance to the facility: “The first view the visitor has of Oak Ridge itself … (is) not very impressive, but that’s the way it was.”

  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-14
17. Shoulder patch worn by personnel of the Manhattan Engineering District.
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-15
18. The Hanford, Washington, facility.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-16
19. President Harry S Truman speaks at the White House on April 17, 1945, five days following the death of President Roosevelt.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-17
20. The University of Chicago’s Physics Building.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-18
21. The Argonne Laboratory, a research facility near Chicago for the Metallurgical Project.
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-19
22. The University of Chicago’s New Chemistry Building, a part of the Metallurgical Laboratory.
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-20
23. Scientific Group at the University of Chicago.

Front (left to right): Enrico Fermi, Walter Zinn, Albert Wattenberg, Herbert Anderson. Center: Harold Agnes, William Sturm, Harold Lictenberger, Leona Marshall, Leo Szilard. Back: Norman Hilberry, Samuel Allison, Thomas Brill, Robert Nobles, Warren Nyer, Marvin Wilkening. [Goldstein 40]

  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-21
24. Wendover Field in 1941

Tibbets selected this site in Utah as the training base for the 509th Composite Group. Before its assignment to the 509th, the 393rd Bombardment Squadron trained at Fairmont Field, Nebraska.

  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 1-22
25. Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr., commanding officer, 509th Composite Group, upon his promotion to full colonel. Note the cardboard eagles on his shoulders.
  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 1-23
26. Two Boeing B-29s on Saipan stand poised for takeoff on the first Tokyo raid of the bombing offensive against Japan, November 24, 1944.

Note the tail-gun position of the aircraft at right.

  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 1-24
27. Major General Uzal Ent, Second Air Force.
  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 1-25
28. Captain William S. Parsons, senior weaponeer, on loan to the 509th Composite Group from the U.S. Navy.
  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 1-26
29. General Henry H. (Hap) Arnold, commander of the U.S. Army Air Forces, chats with Major General Louis E. Woods, USMC, commander of the Nineteenth Army Tactical Air Force on Okinawa during 1945.

This organization had both Army and Marine aircraft. Arnold was responsible for B-29 modification, ballistic tests, and organization and training of the field unit selected to deliver the bomb.

  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-27
30. 509th Composite Group Organization

Not a photograph; a list.

  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 1-28
31. Major Thomas W. Ferebee, the group’s lead bombardier under Colonel Tibbets.
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-29
32. Major Charles W. Sweeney, commanding officer, 393rd Bombardment Squadron.
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-30
33. Eglin Field, Florida, shown here on April 4, 1942.
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 1-31
34. The operations building and aircraft parking area at Batista Airport on December 26, 1943, located about ten miles south-southwest of Havana.

Note the tile roof of the operations building in the foreground. In the parking area beyond lie a C-47 and two B-25s, likely G and C versions.

  • Page number: 12
  • Photo number: 1-32
35. B-29s parked on the hardstand at North Field on the island of Tinian in 1945.

The field was developed on the location of the former Japanese Ushi Point airfield. The Americans used the beaches in the foreground in the invasion of the island.

  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 1-33
36. Ralph A. Bard (right) chats with Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz during the U.S. Naval Academy’s centennial ceremonies in the second week of October 1945.
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 1-34
37. James F. Byrnes (third from left) attends a meeting in 1945 with (l-r) Navy joint Chief Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, former Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Harold R. Stark, Ambassador to Belgium Sawyer, President Harry S Truman, General Dwight D. Eisenhower, and naval aide to the president Captain James K. Vardaman, Jr.
  • Page number: 14
  • Photo number: 1-35
38. General George C. Marshall (left center) chats with Lord Halifax, Admiral Ernest J. King, and Bernard M. Baruch during the Navy Day Dinner at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New York City, on October 27, 1944.
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 1-36
39. Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, a great skeptic concerning the atom bomb project.
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 1-37
40. The Manhattan Project’s deputy director, Brigadier General Thomas F. Farrell, in his office on Tinian in 1945.
  • Page number: 16
  • Photo number: 2-1
41. Tent quarters at North Field, March 28, 1945.
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-2
42. Quonset huts near North Field on Tinian. Similar buildings found use as offices and briefing rooms.
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-3
43. Colonel Elmer E. Kilpatrick, Twentieth Air Force engineer, who expedited construction at Tinian.
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-4
44. Iwo Jima, May 26, 1945, looking toward Mount Suribachi. Note the B-29s parked on the airfield.
  • Page number: 18
  • Photo number: 2-5
45. Aircraft from USS White Plains (CVE-66) sink a Japanese transport off Rota in the Marianas on June 24, 1944.
  • Page number: 18
  • Photo number: 2-6
46. Aerial reconnaissance photo of Truk taken by a PB4T-1 patrol bomber on February 4, 1944.

Eten Island airfield lies at the center, with a multitude of warships and merchantmen anchored in the vicinity.

  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-7
47. Aircraft Commanders, 509th Composite; list
  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-8
48. Major General Curtis E. LeMay, deputy commander, Twentieth Air Force.

He took over as General Spaatz’s chief of staff on August 1, 1945.

  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-9
49. Former ambassador to Japan Joseph C. Grew conducts a press conference at Pearl Harbor on November 16, 1944.
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-10
50. Firebomb damage to a residential and commercial section of Tokyo.
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-11
51. Destruction in downtown Tokyo of the older wood structure is total; only concrete masonry buildings survive.
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-12
52. Further devastation in Tokyo as a result of incendiary bombing raids.
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-13
53. President Truman debarks from USS Augusta (CA-31) at Antwerp, Belgium, en route to the Potsdam Conference, July 15, 1945, followed by Secretary of State James F. Byrnes.
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-14
54. Control house and observation post at Almogordo.

The test bomb, transported via the roadway at right, would be detonated from this point. Note the shadow of the aircraft carrying the Signal Corps Photographer who took this picture.

  • Page number: 22
  • Photo number: 2-15
55. Five-thirty A.M., July 16, 1945. Success – explosion of the test device at Alamogordo.

Unless there should be some last-minute capitulation by the Japanese, the mushroom cloud rendered moot further discussions of war options. [111-SC-217504]

  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-16
56. Crater and scorch marks left behind by the world’s first nuclear detonation. Note the road at left, which terminates at ground zero.
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-17
57. H.I.M. Hirohito, Emperor of Japan.
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-18
58. Combat crews of the 393rd Bombardment Squadron during a target-study class on August 1, 1945.

In the front-row seats are (l-r) Captain Norman W. Ray; Second Lieutenant John E. Cantlon; Captain Frederick C. Bock, Jr.; and Second Lieutenant Paul W. Gruning.

  • Page number: 24
  • Photo number: 2-19
59. The men have shifted their seating somewhat.

Identified officers are (l-r) Major Ralph R. Taylor, Jr.; Lieutenant Cantlon; Major John A. Wilson; Lieutenant Gruning; First Lieutenant Michael Angelich (behind Gruning’s knee), Second Lieutenant Jacob Y. Bontekoe, and First Lieutenant Williamson (scribbling in his notepad).

  • Page number: 24
  • Photo number: 2-20
60. Captain Joseph D. Buscher, from group headquarters, continues his lecture while the photographer moves to the back of the Quonset hut.

Lieutenant Gruning is relaxed, his leg slung onto the table at right.

  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 2-21
61. Lieutenant Charles Levy takes over to discuss a different target.
  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 2-22
62. General Carl A. (Tooey) Spaatz, the field commander responsible for delivery of the atomic bomb.
  • Page number: 26
  • Photo number: 2-23
63. Letter from General Thomas T. Handy to Spaatz, authorizing use of the atomic bombs then on Tinian.
  • Page number: 26
  • Photo number: 2-24
64. Lieutenant General Nathan F. Twining, commanding general, Twentieth Air Force.
  • Page number: 26
  • Photo number: 2-25
65. The “Big Three” at Potsdam

(l-r): Prime Minister Clement Attlee; President Harry S Truman; and Premier Joseph Stalin. China signed the Potsdam Declaration; the U.S.S.R. did not.

  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-26
66. Shigenori Togo, Japan’s foreign minister.
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-27
67. General Korechika Anami, minister of war.
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 2-28
68. General Yoshijiro Umezu, army chief of staff.
  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 2-29
69. Admiral Baron Kantaro Suzuki, prime minister of Japan.
  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 2-30
70. With mind made up, if not completely at ease, in the wake of Japan’s rejection of the Potsdam Declaration, President Truman works in his wardroom on board Augusta during the return trip to the United States.
  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 2-31
71. USS Indianapolis (CA-35) off Mare Island Navy Yard on July 10, 1945.
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 2-32
72. Captain Charles F. H. Begg, whose 1st Ordnance Squadron, Special (Aviation) acted as custodian of the bombs and their components on Tinian.
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 2-33
73. Last known photograph of Indianapolis.

Taken as she prepared to depart Tinian after delivering atomic bomb components.

  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 2-34
74. Track of Indianapolis on the voyage to Leyte that ended in her sinking.
  • Page number: 30
  • Photo number: 2-35
75. Former lieutenant commander Mochitsura Hashimoto, commander of kaiten submarine I-58, examines a navigation chart at the court-martial of Captain McVay.
  • Page number: 30
  • Photo number: 2-36
76. Japanese submarine I-58 at Sasebo after the war, January 28, 1946.
  • Page number: 30
  • Photo number: 2-37
77. Forward torpedo room of I-58.
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 2-38
78. USS Ringness (APD-100).
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 2-39
79. Indianapolis survivors en route to a hospital (probably on Guam) in early August 1945.

The ambulance in the background is marked “U.S.N. Base Hospital Nº 20.”

  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 2-40
80. Following his voyage to Guam on board high-speed transport Ringness, Captain McVay recounts the sinking of Indianapolis to war correspondents in August 1945.
  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 2-41
81. Manhattan Project and mission leaders meet on Tinian in August 1945

(l-r): Rear Admiral William R. Purnell, technical adviser; Brigadier General Thomas F. Farrell, deputy director of the Manhattan Project; Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr., commanding officer, 509th Composite Group; Captain William S. Parsons, USN, weaponeer on the Hiroshima mission.

  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 3-1
82. Crew of group commander Tibbets.

Standing (l-r): Second Lieutenant Morris Jeppson; Captain Robert A. Lewis; Brigadier General John H. Davies (commanding general, 313th Bombardment Wing); Colonel Tibbets; Major Thomas W. Ferebee; Captain Parsons. Kneeling (l-r): Staff Sergeant Wyatt E. Duzenbury; Sergeant Joseph A. Stiborik; Captain Theodore J. Van Kirk; Staff Sergeant George R. Caron; Sergeant Robert R. Shumard; Private First Class Richard H. Nelson. Not pictured is First Lieutenant Jacob Beser, radar countermeasures officer.

  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 3-2
83. Crew Members for Hiroshima Mission – August 6, 1945; list.
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 3-3
84. New York Times correspondent William L. Laurence stands by the group public relations officer.

Laurence would ride in The Great Artiste on the mission to Nagasaki. He would become a Pulitzer Prize winner.

  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 3-4
85. An unidentified officer chats with Ferebee, Tibbets, and Van Kirk.

All seem in good spirits except for Bombardier Ferebee, who appears rather somber – perhaps because of the pressure and responsibility of personally delivering the bomb.

  • Page number: 36
  • Photo number: 3-5
86. Bathed in the glare of klieg lights, Colonel Tibbets’s crew poses with Major John W. Porter (ground operations officer and commanding officer of the 390th Air Service Group) before boarding Enola Gay early in the morning of August 6.

Those present are, standing (l-r): Major Porter, Captain Van Kirk, Major Ferebee, Colonel Tibbets, Captain Lewis, and First Lieutenant Jacob Beser, in charge of radar countermeasures. Kneeling (l-r): Sergeant Stiborik, Staff Sergeant Caron, Private First Class Nelson, Sergeant Shumard, Staff Sergeant Duzenbury.

  • Page number: 36
  • Photo number: 3-6
87. Perhaps pausing in his bomb-bay activities with Captain Parsons, Lieutenant Jeppson smiles for the cameraman and posterity before bombing.
  • Page number: 36
  • Photo number: 3-7
88. The Hiroshima bomb, Little Boy, being placed in the bomb bay of Enola Gay at North Field on Tinian, August 5, 1945.

Present (l-r) are Rear Admiral Purnell, Brigadier General Farrell, and Captain Parsons. At center, with hands on hips, is Dr. Norman Ramsey of the Los Alamos Technical Group.

  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 3-8
89. Corporal Robert Behr assists with the takeoff broadcast.
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 3-9
90. Tibbets waves from the cockpit of Enola Gay just prior to takeoff.
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 3-10
91. Enola Gay prepares to taxi onto the runway at North Field, Tinian.[Maxwell 31]
  • Page number: 38
  • Photo number: 3-11
92. Enola Gay prepares to taxi onto the runway at North Field, Tinian. [Maxwell 32]
  • Page number: 38
  • Photo number: 3-12
93. The Targets; map.
  • Page number: 39
  • Photo number: 3-13
94. Hiroshima stretches out like the fingers of a giant hand in this prestrike mosaic of reconnaissance photographs.
  • Page number: 40
  • Photo number: 3-14
95. This map displays various features marking Hiroshima as a legitimate military target.
  • Page number: 40
  • Photo number: 3-15
96. During the Sino-Japanese War, Emperor Meiji made his headquarters in this building.
  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 3-16
97. Ujima Harbor, developed as a port for Hiroshima, was a major point of embarkation for the Japanese Army.
  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 3-17
98. View looking northeast down Tera-machi, the Street of Temples.

The road here was considerably wider than in most of the residential areas. No buildings in this area survived.

  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 3-18
99. Aerial view of the very densely built-up area of the city on the Motoyasu River looking upstream.
  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 3-19
100. An early photograph looking upstream on the Motoyasu River toward what would become the most famous of all Hiroshima landmarks – the domed City Commercial Display Building, immediately adjacent to ground zero.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 3-20
101. An older photo looking north from the vicinity of the T-Bridge.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 3-21
102. Radio station JOFK. This main building housed studios, offices, and transmitters.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 3-22
103. View looking east into Hiroshima’s shopping district.
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 3-23
104. The living room in an upper-middle-class Hiroshima house.
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 3-24
105. Another living room, showing straw mats (tatami) and low table (dai).
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 3-25
106. A Hiroshima kitchen, which its owner described as modern.
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 3-26
107. This view of a house under construction shows workers mixing straw into the plaster for this house’s exterior walls. Note the split-bamboo lathing.
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 3-27
108. The plaster-and-bamboo lathing typical of exterior walls in Japanese domestic architecture.
  • Page number: 46
  • Photo number: 3-28
109. A hand-drawn water pumper.
  • Page number: 46
  • Photo number: 3-29
110. Another smaller pumper.
  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 3-30
111. Two young females firefighters demonstrate movement of their equipment.
  • Page number: 47
  • Photo number: 3-31
112. This annotated aerial photograph, taken August 8, 1945, shows Major Ferebee’s aiming point and various landmarks within the city.
  • Page number: 48
  • Photo number: 4-1
113. Little Boy, the Hiroshima bomb that Major Ferebee toggled out of Enola Gay at 8:15 A.M. Hiroshima time on August 6, 1945.
  • Page number: 49
  • Photo number: 4-2
114. Map of Hiroshima, showing ground zero and the city’s geographical features.
  • Page number: 49
  • Photo number: 4-3
115. Far end of the T-bridge.

The buckled brickwork and misaligned trolley tracks attest that the structure was moved over approximately one foot to the right.

  • Page number: 49
  • Photo number: 4-4
116. A fiery cloud boils skyward from Hiroshima at about 8:18
  • Page number: 50
  • Photo number: 4-5
117. Ten to twenty minutes after the detonation, a mushroom cloud stands over Hiroshima, leveled out at about 60,000 feet by the stratosphere inversion.
  • Page number: 50
  • Photo number: 4-6
118. The last halting steps of an unknown Hiroshima inhabitant.
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 4-7
119. This young soldier’s face was burned when he looked toward the explosion: his cap protected the top of his head.
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 4-8
120. Tattered clothing recovered from bomb victims after the explosion [253-HP-731567-38]
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 4-9
121. Tattered clothing recovered from bomb victims after the explosion [253-HP-731567-39]
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 4-10
122. Hiroshima; map.
  • Page number: 52
  • Photo number: 4-11
123. Looking toward the city center from directly over ground zero.

Note the absence of rubble above ground level, the wooden structures having been reduced to ashes.

  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 4-12
124. Ground zero at Hiroshima (indicted by the arrow), looking east.

Only reinforced-concrete buildings remain and all have sustained significant structural damage. The T-bridge and the City Commercial Display Building, both ground zero landmarks, are visible in the upper portion.

  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 4-13
125. Near ground zero, masonry or brick structures failed to stand up to the blast.
  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 4-14
126. The searing heat of the explosion manifested itself even inside buildings.

Here, a window’s outline is scotched onto three chairs.

  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 4-15
127. This view of Hiroshima reveals the extent of damage.

Note until 11/4 miles from ground zero are structures standing without apparent damage, even seen from this relatively high altitude.

  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 4-16
128. An example of the ghosting phenomenon.

Lattice at a gas storage tank produced the effect seen here.

  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 4-17
129. The shadow of a ladder seared into the same gas storage tank bears witness to the intensity of the heat and radiation from the bomb explosion.
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 4-18
130. The image produced by a valve and hand wheel documents the precise direction of the radiation/heat source.
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 4-19
131. Ghostly outlines of guard rails on one Hiroshima’s many bridges.
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 4-20
132. Human beings vaporized by the intense heat left ghostly traces of their last moments.
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 4-21
133. Chart – The most dreaded symbol of the twentieth century.

The development of a mushroom cloud, as analyzed by the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey.

  • Page number: 56
  • Photo number: 4-22
134. Enola Gay returns to Tinian on August 6.
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 4-23
135. An excited crowd of 509th Composite Group personnel huddles close to Enola Gay.
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 4-24
136. General Spaatz greets Colonel Tibbets and awards him the Distinguished Services Cross.
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 4-25
137. Spaatz returns Tibbets’s salute, as Brigadier General John H. Davies, commander of the 313th Bombardment Wing, looks on.
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 4-26
138. Immediately following the decoration ceremony on the hardstand, Tibbets’s men were debriefed by a stellar assembly.

Including (l-r): Rear Admiral Purnell, General Spaatz, Lieutenant General Barney M. Giles (Spaatz’ deputy commander), and Lieutenant General Twining, shown here waiting for the debriefing to commence.

  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 4-27
139. An unidentified officer questions Tibbets’s navigator, Captain Van Kirk.

Others seated at the table (clockwise from Van Kirk) are: Colonel Tibbets, Rear Admiral Purnell, Lieutenant General Twining, Lieutenant General Giles, General Spaatz, Captain Parsons, Lieutenant Beser, Major Ferebee, and Brooklyn Dodger fan Staff Sergeant Caron. Brigadier General Davies looks on from behind and to the right of General Giles. [Maxwell 29]

  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 4-28
140. A large assemblage of 509th personnel attended the ceremony held on August 9 to honor Tibbets’s men.
  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 4-29
141. Members of Tibbets’s crew were decorated by Brigadier General Davies.

Present at the ceremony are (l-r): Colonel Tibbets, Captain Parsons, Brigadier General Davies, Captain Lewis (face hidden), Lieutenant Beser, Lieutenant Jeppson, Staff Sergeant Duzenbury, Staff Sergeant Caron, Sergeant Stiborik, Sergeant Shumard, Private First Class Nelson.

  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 4-30
142. Boeing F-13 reconnaissance aircraft, which was a B-29 modified to carry photographic equipment.
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 4-31
143. Japanese army barracks 4,200 feet north of ground zero, close by the old castle complex.

Partly because of the blast pressure from the outside, and partly because of debris from collapsed roofs and floors, masonry and brickwork were blasted into the interiors of structures, rather than flying outward in the pattern associated with hits sustained during conventional bombing.

  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 4-32
144. Hiroshima’s war industries located away from the city center naturally suffered less, but still sustained considerable damage such as that seen in the munitions plant here.
  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 4-33
145. Hiroshima railroad station.
  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 4-34
146. Ruins of the Imperial Castle and army headquarters compound at center, half a mile from ground zero, looking southwest.
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 4-35
147. Imperial Castle and army headquarters compound. This photo is undated.
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 4-36
148. Looking west past the castle compound.
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 4-37
149. Captain Mitsuo Fuchida, air operations officer of the Japanese navy.

As a commander, he had led the air attack on Pearl Harbor.

  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 4-38
150. Marquis Koichi Kido, Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal.
  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 4-39
151. Dr. Yoshio Nishina, Japanese authority on atomic energy.
  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 4-40
152. Hiroshima from high altitude, August 7, 1945, exhibits few details, except for its roadnet.
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 4-41
153. Photograph offered as a comparison in the Strategic Bombing Survey study of Hiroshima, after the bomb explosion, showing the City Commercial Display Building. [243-HP-731568-72]
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 4-43
154. Five overlapping photographs provide a stark, wide-angle view of Hiroshima from the vicinity of ground zero (indicated by the arrow).

The City Commerce Display Building is at center. At right is the T-Bridge, near the divergence of the Matoyan and Ota rivers. [3A-03450, 3A-03454, 3A-03452, 3A-03443, 3A-03442]

  • Page number: 64-65
  • Photo number: 4-44A-E
155. Ground zero at Hiroshima (indicated by the arrow), looking south.
  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 4-45
156. View of the island straddled by the Tenma and Fukushima rivers.

The tip of the island is at lower right.

  • Page number: 65
  • Photo number: 4-46
157. Looking south toward the ground zero area from a point 3/4 mile farther north.
  • Page number: 66
  • Photo number: 4-47
158. View looking west across the breadth of the city, half a mile from ground zero.
  • Page number: 66
  • Photo number: 4-48
159. View of the ruined city from atop the Red Cross building, one-half mile from ground zero. [3A-3439]
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-49
160. View of the ruined city from atop the Red Cross building, one-half mile from ground zero.
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-50
161. Although many of Hiroshima’s bridges survived the explosion, some lighter ones did not.
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-51
162. Modern structures within half a mile of ground zero suffered severe damage, most often in the form of walls buckled away from the direction of the explosion.
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 4-52
163. Hiroshima Gas Company, 800 feet south of ground zero.

This structure also appears along the far left edge of 4-50. The City Commercial Display Building stands at far right in the fist photo of the pair. [3A-3446]

  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 4-53
164. Hiroshima Gas Company, 800 feet south of ground zero.

This structure also appears along the far left edge of 4-50. The City Commercial Display Building stands at far right in the fist photo of the pair. [3A-3444]

  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 4-54
165. Koa Fire Insurance Company, 1,300 feet from ground zero.

Brick buildings did not fare as well as those of concrete and steel.

  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 4-55
166. Chugokyu Electric Company’s Minami substation, before the bombing, 1,500 feet from ground zero. [243-H-955] [243-HP-731568-299]
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 4-56
167. Chugokyu Electric Company’s Minami substation, after the bombing, 1,500 feet from ground zero. [3A-03460]
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 4-57
168. Shimomuna Watch Shop, a steel-frame building 2,000 feet from ground zero.
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 4-58
169. Hiroshima Telephone Company, 2,500 feet from ground zero.

Here, the switch and relay rack room lies destroyed. This picture was taken on October 28, 1945.

  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 4-59
170. Hiroshima’s forlorn city hall stands empty, gutted by fire some 3,000 feet from the hypocenter.

This photo was taken on November 1, 1945.

  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 4-60
171. At a branch of the Hiroshima Fire Department, the city’s only hook-and-ladder truck lies charred alongside two other vehicles, 4,000 feet from ground zero.
  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 4-61
172. The earth-and-log air-raid shelter at center survived the blast intact 5,000 feet northeast of ground zero, although other buildings did not.
  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 4-62
173. Farther south, looking northwest. Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital lies at center near the river, about one mile from ground zero.
  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 4-63
174. Beyond 1 1/2 miles from ground zero, some wooden buildings, such as this one 7,600 feet away, survived badly buckled and knocked about.
  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 4-64
175. At the Misawa Credit Association Warehouse, the walls stand but the ceiling and the entire second floor have been pushed down to ground level.

Where the ceilings have held, they appear as if battered by a demolition ball. [3A-03464]

  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 4-65
176. At the Misawa Credit Association Warehouse, the walls stand but the ceiling and the entire second floor have been pushed down to ground level.

Where the ceilings have held, they appear as if battered by a demolition ball. [3A-03463]

  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 4-66
177. At the Misawa Credit Association Warehouse, the walls stand but the ceiling and the entire second floor have been pushed down to ground level.

Where the ceilings have held, they appear as if battered by a demolition ball. [243-H-174] [243-HP-731567-384]

  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 4-67
178. The blast carried away portions of the Chugokyu Power Company’s downspouts.
  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 4-68
179. A reinforced concrete smokestack lies on its side.

Note the power pole in the distance leaning in the opposite direction.

  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 4-69
180. Near the Commercial Display Buildings, trees still stand at right with branches charred, but intact.
  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 4-70
181. The rubble-strewn courtyard of the Commercial Display Building.

Unfortunately, the text on the board bound to the concrete post at lower right is illegible.

  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 4-71
182. The annex adjacent to the Commercial Display Building.
  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 4-72
183. A Hiroshima street. Note the drainpipe, which the vacuum created by the atomic blast has pulled up through the pavement.
  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 4-73
184. A cemetery in disarray, possibly the army burial grounds about 1 1/2 miles from ground zero.

The only legible stone, that of army captain Akira Sasaki, is at lower right.

  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 4-74
185. Christianity was (and remains) very much a minority religion in Japan. Ruins of churches in Japan seem to have been of particular interest to Americans.

This particular church caught the eyes of at least three different photographers – one each from the U.S. Army Air Forces, the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey (USSBS), and the U.S Navy. [3A-3363]

  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 4-75
186. Christianity was (and remains) very much a minority religion in Japan. Ruins of churches in Japan seem to have been of particular interest to Americans.

This particular church caught the eyes of at least three different photographers – one each from the U.S. Army Air Forces, the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey (USSBS), and the U.S Navy. [243-HP-II-401] [243-HP-73167-362]

  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 4-76
187. Christianity was (and remains) very much a minority religion in Japan. Ruins of churches in Japan seem to have been of particular interest to Americans.

This particular church caught the eyes of at least three different photographers – one each from the U.S. Army Air Forces, the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey (USSBS), and the U.S Navy. [80-G-473742]

  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 4-77
188. Admiral Soemu Toyoda (left), navy chief of staff, examines a chart at the headquarters of the Imperial Combined Fleet in April 1944. On the right sits Captain Mitsuo Fuchida.
  • Page number: 76
  • Photo number: 4-78
189. Crew Members of Nagasaki Mission – August 9, 1945; list
  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 5-1
190. Captain Frederick L. Ashworth, USN, as a commander circa 1943.

He served as weaponeer for the Nagasaki bomb.

  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 5-2
191. Second Lieutenant Philip M. Barnes, Ashworth’s assistant weaponeer.
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 5-3
192. Fat Man, the Nagasaki bomb, toggled out of Bock’s Car by Captain Kermit K. Beahan at 10:58 A.M. Nagasaki time on August 9, 1945.
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 5-4
193. Crew of squadron commander Sweeney.

Standing (l-r): Captain Kermit K. Beahan; Captain James F. Van Pelt, Jr.; First Lieutenant Charles D. Albury; Second Lieutenant Fred J. Olivi; Major Charles W. Sweeney. Kneeling (l-r): Staff Sergeant Edward R. Buckley; Master Sergeant John D. Kuharek; Sergeant Raymond G. Gallagher; Staff Sergeant Albert D. DeHart; Sergeant Abe M. Spitzer. Not pictured are First Lieutenant Jacob Beser, radar countermeasures; Captain Frederick L. Ashworth, USN weaponeer; Second Lieutenant Philip M. Barnes, assistant weaponeer.

  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 5-5
194. Irwin talks with copilot Albury, while behind Irwin, radio operator Spitzer passes the moment with cigar-toting Sweeney.
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 5-6
195. First Lieutenant Ralph N. Devore.

One of the airplane commanders from the 393rd Bombardment Squadron, talks with Sweeney before takeoff.

  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 5-7
196. One last check on the navigation charts by Van Pelt, Sweeney, and Olivi.
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 5-8
197. Armed with flashlight and cigar, Sweeney checks out Bock’s Car before takeoff in the early-morning hours of August 9.
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 5-9
198. An annotated aerial view of Nagasaki.

This is a reconnaissance mosaic.

  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 5-10
199. Customs House from the port of Nagasaki.
  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 5-11
200. Nagasaki Prefecture Courthouse.
  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 5-12
201. Ohato Street, Nagasaki. Note the electric streetcar.
  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 5-13
202. Typical residential quarter in Nagasaki.
  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 5-14
203. This particular firehouse in Nagasaki proudly displays “No. 3,” a modern pumper unit.
  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 5-15
204. One of Nagasaki’s downtown shopping area.
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 5-16
205. Nagasaki’s main police station (right) in the city’s mercantile district.
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 5-16
206. Small boats lie nestled together in a tributary of the Nakeshima River.
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 5-19
207. Nagasaki, 10:58 A.M., August 9, 1945; map.
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-20
208. Seen from one of the B-29s, the fireball boils upward from Nagasaki one minute after Beahan dropped the bomb. [3A-03637]
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-21
209. Seen from one of the B-29s, the fireball boils upward from Nagasaki one minute after Beahan dropped the bomb. [3A-03638]
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 5-22
210. From two different vantage points, the mushroom cloud continues its climb toward the stratosphere.
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 5-23
211. From two different vantage points, the mushroom cloud continues its climb toward the stratosphere.
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 5-24
212. Nagasaki; map.
  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 5-25
213. This view of the port facility of Nagasaki, 7,500 feet from the hypocenter, provides a graphic illustration of the “acoustics” of the bomb blast.
  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 5-26
214. Annotated aerial mosaic of Nagasaki several days after the bombing.
  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 5-27
215. Aerial photo of the city showing ground zero and concentric circles half a mile and one mile from the hypocenter.
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 5-28
216. The featureless plain of the Urakami River valley within half a mile of ground zero.
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 5-29
217. At 5,000 feet from the hypocenter, a residential area on the west bank of the Urakami borders a logging operation slightly downriver from the Mitsubishi complex.
  • Page number: 91
  • Photo number: 5-30
218. Japanese soldiers rummage through the ruins of the city.
  • Page number: 91
  • Photo number: 5-31
219. A panorama of four photos taken from ground zero, west at center.

The two large schools near the hypocenter, Chinzei, and Shiroyama, lie at the left and center, respectively. [243-NP-I-1-34; 243-NP-I-1-35; 243-NP-I-1-36; 243-NP-I-1-37]

  • Page number: 92-93
  • Photo number: 5-32A-D
220. A panorama of four photos taken from ground zero, northeast at center.

At left center is the Urakami River valley. Just out of the panorama at right is the Nagasaki Medical College. [243-NP-I-1-26; 243-NP-I-1-27; 243-NP-I-1-32; 243-NP-I-1-33]

  • Page number: 92-93
  • Photo number: 5-33A-D
221. Nagasaki from near ground zero.
  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 5-34
222. The vicinity of ground zero on the Urakami River looking northwest.

The athletic complex here served Chinzei School (just out of the picture at left) and Shiroyama Elementary School at upper left.

  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 5-35
223. Northeast of ground zero, 1,00 feet out.
  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 5-36
224. A reinforced - concrete chimney stack snapped off by the explosion lies 1/4 mile from the center of the blast.
  • Page number: 95
  • Photo number: 5-37
225. Beam, ceiling, and column failure as seen in a school’s interior 1/4 mile from the explosion.
  • Page number: 95
  • Photo number: 5-38
226. At 1,500 feet from the hypocenter a streetcar sits, blown six feet off the track.
  • Page number: 95
  • Photo number: 5-39
227. At 2,500 feet out, steel-and-concrete buildings stand, but little else does.

The roof of the small church at center (note the adjacent cemetery) has collapsed, along with one of the gables.

  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 5-40
228. An entire row of small trees lies flat, snapped off close to the ground at 2,700 feet.
  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 5-41
229. A roofing tile blistered by intense heat at ground zero.
  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 5-42
230. This bridge sustained damage reminiscent of the sort suffered at Hiroshima.

Note the concrete guardrails resting in the streambed at some distance from the bridge.

  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-43
231. Reinforced concrete walls of certain buildings near ground zero exhibited an uncanny windblown appearance.
  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-44
232. Underground bomb shelters dug into an earthen mound near ground.
  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 5-45
233. Fire destroyed entire residential areas of the city, including some sheltered areas.

Here, a firebreak saved the houses on the hillside from suffering the same fate as those on the other side of the firebreak.

  • Page number: 98
  • Photo number: 5-46
234. At 9,600 feet, areas, directly in the path of the blast coming down the river valley were destroyed, by both fire and blast damage.
  • Page number: 98
  • Photo number: 5-46
235. Nagasaki’s old police station sits amid devastation, 8,200 feet from ground zero. Note the intact housing at right.
  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 5-48
236. All wooden buildings in the vicinity of Nakamachi Church were destroyed, 8,800 feet from the center.
  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 5-49
237. Wooden houses still stand at approximately 1 1/2 miles from ground zero.
  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 5-50
238. View looking south east toward the mouth of the Urakami where the river widens to an estuary at Nagasaki’s port facility at far right. [3A-3598; 3A-3599]
  • Page number: 100
  • Photo number: 5-51A-B
239. Wreckage of an ordnance factory 750 feet from ground zero.

The stacks standing at the center are visible at right in 5-32.

  • Page number: 100
  • Photo number: 5-52
240. This storage tank at the Yachiyo-Machi Gas Works collapses under the force of the blast at 6,600 feet from ground zero.
  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 5-53
241. Even from more than a mile distant, the terrific downward pressure wave caved in the tops of tanks not collapsed.
  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 5-54
242. A collapsed row of gas bottles shoved to the right at this container-manufacturing facility testifies to the direction of the blast.
  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 5-55
243. The sprawling Mitsubishi Steel and Armament Works, 3/5 mile downriver from ground zero.
  • Page number: 102
  • Photo number: 5-56
244. The Mitsubishi Works along the eastern shore of the Urakami River 2/3 mile south.
  • Page number: 102
  • Photo number: 5-57
245. The great Mitsubishi complex, looking north up the Urakami River.
  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 5-58
246. The wrecked machine shop of the Mitsubishi complex lay at approximately the 4,000-foot mark.

Note the machines torn from their foundations by collapsing steel members from the ceiling.

  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 5-59
247. Note how the uptight girders have been pushed over at about 10 degrees at the Mitsubishi torpedo-assembly plant.
  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 5-60
248. Torpedo-assembly equipment.
  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 5-61
249. Collapsed ceilings and walls in the torpedo plant.
  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 5-62
250. Downriver, 5,000 feet south from the hypocenter, this electrical switchboard lies upended and damaged by fire.
  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 5-63
251. At 5,000 feet out from the center, an occasional wooden structure survived, although damaged by blast and fire.
  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-64
252. Structure 11,120 feet south of ground zero exhibit only blast damage.

In the foreground is a firebreak, likely constructed with the aid of the grader at right.

  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-65
253. At 12,000 feet southeast there is superficial damage, including roofing tiles and fascia board knocked away.
  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 5-66
254. At 13,000 feet southeast: an occasional light wall blown over.
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 5-67
255. At 14,000 feet southeast: loosened roofing on this well-built foreign-style house.
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 5-68
256. At 14,125 feet southwest of ground zero; at last, undamaged dwellings, nearly 2 2/3 miles from the hypocenter.
  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-69
257. Urakami Cathedral, one of Nagasaki’s prominent landmarks, stands on a hill amid the rubble of a residential district east of ground zero.
  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-70
258. View looking southwest toward ground zero and the Urakami River from a point 1/4 mile distant.

Note the terraced ground at left in one of the city’s residential areas. In the foreground are the ruins of Urakami Prison.

  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 5-71
259. Looking east across the Urakami River valley toward the ruins of Nagasaki Medical College nestled against the hills beyond.

Ground zero is almost out of the photo at left.

  • Page number: 108
  • Photo number: 5-72
260. Closer view of the Nagasaki Medical College complex, 2,500 feet from ground zero.
  • Page number: 108
  • Photo number: 5-73
261. Another scene of ruin, 500 yards south of the cathedral, this time at Nagasaki Medical College.

Shiroyama School lies across the valley.

  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 5-74
262. The photographer turns left, walks out of the previous picture at right, moves down the hill, turns and takes another photo.
  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 5-75
263. Ending his trek down the hill, the photographer walks between the two far buildings at center in 5-75 to record yet more devastation.
  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 5-76
264. Nothing remains of the college’s wooden storehouse here, except for ashes and a low mound of melted glass.
  • Page number: 110
  • Photo number: 5-77
265. Here, debris crashed into an operating room from several floors above.
  • Page number: 110
  • Photo number: 5-78
266. Fire completely destroyed the contents of this examination and record-storage room.
  • Page number: 111
  • Photo number: 5-79
267. An athletic complex in the vicinity of the Mitsubishi Armory, one mile north of ground zero.
  • Page number: 111
  • Photo number: 5-80
268. On September 29, 1945, an unnamed Signal Corps photographer strolled out to the arch, faced northwest, and took this picture of the Mitsubishi factory at left and Shiroyama School in the background against the hills at right.
  • Page number: 111
  • Photo number: 5-81
269. A sad spectacle indeed greeted the photographer who, from the cathedral steps, peered across the Urakami River valley and through the mist toward ruined Chinzei School.
  • Page number: 112
  • Photo number: 5-82
270. Chinzei School from the east bank of the Urakami River.
  • Page number: 112
  • Photo number: 5-83
271. A view from the air shows that, although from a distance Chinzei School appears to be intact, the entire roof has fallen in onto the building’s third floor.
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 5-84
272. Before the bombing, munitions work proceeded apace, as evidenced by the machine tools seen here on Cinzei’s first floor.
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 5-85
273. A residential area just east of ground zero, 1,000 feet out from the hypocenter.

Urakami Cathedral lies in the distance.

  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 5-86
274. Residential structures at the mile mark, with their plaster-and-bamboo-lath exterior walls, were still no match for Fat Man’s power.
  • Page number: 114
  • Photo number: 5-87
275. In the shadows of the cathedral, Nagasaki citizens bereft of regular housing have erected impromptu hovels from the debris around the. Note the tarpaulin on the “house” at right.
  • Page number: 114
  • Photo number: 5-88
276. Farther down the estuary from 5-26, approximately two miles from ground zero, fires consumed a large area behind the waterfront.
  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 5-89
277. At 2 1/4 miles from the hypocenter, on the west bank of the estuary, residential areas away from the shipyard and dry-dock area remain intact.

Structures along the estuary received the lion’s share of the bomb’s wrath.

  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 5-90
278. Nagasaki’s bewildered and stunned citizens trudge down a city street in the wake of the atomic explosion.

This is a Japanese photograph.

  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 5-91
279. Facing northeast, a photographer looked across the platform toward Nagasaki Medical College at far right.

Just under the college buildings is a signboard bearing the two kanji characters for the station’s place name, Ura-kami. Also note the Shinto arch, left of the sign, which aroused the curiosity of at least one other photographer.

  • Page number: 116
  • Photo number: 5-92
280. Passengers line up, waiting for the train at Urakami Station, which lay to the rear of the gutted Mitsubishi armaments factory, looking west from the platform. [3A-3675; 3A-3676]
  • Page number: 116
  • Photo number: 5-93A-B
281. Prince Fumimaro Konoye (left) and Vice Admiral Mitsumasa Yonai (right), navy minister in Suzuki’s cabinet.
  • Page number: 117
  • Photo number: 6-1
282. Vice Admiral Mitsumasa Yonai Suzuki’s navy minister.
  • Page number: 117
  • Photo number: 6-2
283. Vice Admiral Matome Ugaki, commander-in-chief, Fifth Air Fleet.
  • Page number: 119
  • Photo number: 6-3
284. Vice Admiral Takijiro Onishi, deputy chief of staff, Imperial Japanese Navy.
  • Page number: 120
  • Photo number: 6-4
285. V-J Day in Times Square, New York City, August 14, 1945.

Americans celebrate their hard-won victory over the Japanese empire.

  • Page number: 121
  • Photo number: 6-5
286. Every American town rejoiced at the news of the Japanese acceptance of the surrender terms.
  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 6-6
287. The headlines if this Washington Times-Herald extra for August 15, 1945, said it all.
  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 6-7
288. A sailor enfolds a young nurse in an impromptu embrace.

Many people have claimed to be the couple shown here. Although very similar to the photo by Albert Eisenstaedt appearing in the August 27, 1945, issue of Life magazine, this one was actually taken by a Navy photographer, one Lieutenant Jorrensen. Jorrensen stood about two steps to the right of Eisenstaedt. The sailor in whites behind the embracing pair also appears in the Life photo.

  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 6-8
289. Women kneel and pray in St. Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth
  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 6-9
290. Women kneel and pray in St. Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth
  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 6-10
291. The 22nd Special Naval Construction Battalion celebrates the end of the war at the naval amphibious base on Manus, Admiralty Islands.
  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 6-11
292. Men on the destroyer escort Wileman (DE-22) voice unanimous joy that their days of cramped quarters will soon be at an end.
  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 6-12
293. On Tinian, Father Toomey (close-up) celebrates Mass with the 509th Composite Group on August 16, 1945. [Maxwell 2]
  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 6-13
294. On Tinian, Father Toomey celebrates Mass with the 509th Composite Group on August 16, 1945.
  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 6-14

Box Photo 10
Folder 1-2 Published Images, 1945
295. Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu
  • Page number: 125
  • Photo number: 7-1
296. Vice Admiral John S. McCain, commanding Task Force 38, comes on board Missouri (BB-63) via boatswain’s chair for a conference with Admiral William F. Halsey, Commander, Third Fleet, on August 15, 1945.
  • Page number: 126
  • Photo number: 7-2
297. Her naval ensign fluttering form the mainmast, the Japanese destroyer Hatsuzakura steams alongside USS Nicholas (DD-449) on August 27, 1945, before the transfer of naval officers and harbor pilots to Missouri for discussions regarding entry of the Third Fleet into Tokyo Bay.
  • Page number: 127
  • Photo number: 7-3
298. Nicholas’s whaleboat comes aboard Hatsuzakura to take on board the Tokyo Bay emissaries.
  • Page number: 127
  • Photo number: 7-4
299. On board Nicholas, the Japanese harbor delegation offers a sword for examination by two American naval officers.
  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 7-5
300. Encumbered by chart cases, Commander Furatani clambers on board Missouri at 8:55, “welcomed” by a lieutenant (right) and a member of the ship’s Marine detachment (left).
  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 7-6
301. Halsey’s chief of staff, RADM Robert B. Carney (wearing a baseball cap at left) goes over charts of Sagami Bay and Tokyo Bay with Captain Takasaki, Captain Otani, and the interpreter.

The Missouri state seal is at left. Note the sweat-soaked American officer with binoculars at center. [80-G-490401]

  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 7-7
302. August 27, 1945, 6:16 P.M. Sunset over Fujiyama, seen from Missouri’s bridge as she lay at anchor on the evening of her arrival in the Sagami Sea.

Other vessels lie in the distance, including (at center) two Royal Navy battleships, Duke of York and King George V.

  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 7-8
303. Halsey welcomes Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz on board the USS South Dakota (BB-57) in Tokyo Bay, August 29, 1945.

The purpose of the visit was to discuss early recovery of Americans from the prisoner-of-war camps around Tokyo.

  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 7-9
304. Flying Halsey’s four-star flag, Missouri lies at anchor in Tokyo Bay on August 30, 1945.
  • Page number: 130
  • Photo number: 7-10
305. Pearl Harbor survivor USS West Virginia (BB-48) rests in Tokyo Bay offer arriving on August 30.
  • Page number: 130
  • Photo number: 7-11
306. U.S. naval officers and their interpreter pose in the front of a Japanese J1N1-R “Irving” fighter after landing the first U.S. combat aircraft at Atsugi airfield near Tokyo on August 29, 1945.

Those present are (l-r): Lieutenant Commander Don Thorburn, Lieutenant Commander E. V. Wedell, interpreter Toda, Lieutenant Commander John N. MacInnes, Lieutenant W. V. Ballew, and Lieutenant Commander Cliff McDowell.

  • Page number: 131
  • Photo number: 7-12
307. Naval officers with members of the Soviet legation of Atsugi (left to right) Lieutenant Commander MacInnes, Lieutenant Commander Thorburn, Mr. Samiloff of the Soviet legation, Cmdr. Anatoly Rodinov of the Soviet Navy, and Lieutenant Commander Wedell. [80-G-490419]
  • Page number: 131
  • Photo number: 7-13
308. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur talks with Allied and Japanese newsmen upon his arrival at Atsugi airfield on August 30, 1945.
  • Page number: 131
  • Photo number: 7-14
309. Members of the Japanese delegation board USS Lansdowne (DD-486) at 6:33 A.M. on September 2, 1945, for the 1-hour-45-minute voyage to Missouri.
  • Page number: 132
  • Photo number: 7-15
310. An honor guard presents arms at Yokohama as Mac-Arthur arrives for the voyage to surrender site.

Buchanan lies moored at right.

  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 7-16
311. Admiral Sir Bruce Fraser, the United Kingdom’s signatory to the surrender, steps onto Missouri after the short hop from Duke of York.
  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 7-17
312. General Joseph W. Stillwell (left) talks to a group of American officers while awaiting the surrender ceremony.
  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 7-18
313. Missouri’s graceful bow frames Mount Fuji.

Note anchor chain and Union Jack. Either Duke of York or King George V lies in the distance at left.

  • Page number: 134
  • Photo number: 7-19
314. The scene on Missouri just moments before the surrender ceremony.
  • Page number: 134
  • Photo number: 7-20
315. Her crew mustered in dress whites, Missouri stands ready to receive the Japanese delegation on the morning of September 2, 1945.

Note the Gleaves-class destroyer (likely Buchanan) standing by on her starboard beam.

  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 7-21
316. Missouri from astern. Note the Curtiss SC-1 Seahawk scout planes on her catapults.
  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 7-22
317. Accompanied by Nimitz, MacArthur strides by the barbette of Number 2 turret toward the cloth-bedecked mess table, on which lies the Instrument of Surrender.
  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 7-23
318. MacArthur and Nimitz board USS Missouri (BB-63) to receive the Japanese surrender September 2, 1945. [NH 49707]
  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 7-24
319. Missouri’s welcoming party comes to attention and salutes as Foreign Minster Shigemitsu, visible at left in the top hat, struggles to board the battleship at 8:56.
  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 7-25
320. Shigemitsu’s credentials. The Japanese were not asked to present them. [80-G-70150]
  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 7-26
321. Shigemitsu’s credentials. The Japanese were not asked to present them.
  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 7-27
322. The Japanese delegation presents itself to MacArthur.

In the group are (front row left to right) Mamoru Shigemitsu, Foreign Minister; General Toshijiro Umezu, Chief of Staff; (second row Lt. Gen. Shinichi Miyazaki, Director of the 1st Department of the Army Division of General Headquarters; Katsuo Okazaki, Director General of the Central Liaison Office; RADM Sadatoshi Tomioke, Director of the 1st Department of the Navy Division of General Headquarters; Toshikazu Kase, Director of the 3rd Department of the Board of Information; Maj. Gen. Yatsuji Nagai, Army Staff Officer of General Headquarters; (third row) hidden, RADM Ichiro Yokoyama, Navy Minister; hidden Saburo Ohta, Director of the 3rd Department of the Central Liaison Office; Capt. Katsuo Shiba, Navy Staff Officer of General Headquarters; Col. Ichiji Sugita, army Staff Officer of General Headquarters. Lt. C. F. Wheeler took this and many Navy photographs from this vantage point. [80-G-348365]

  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 7-28
323. At 9:02 A.M., MacArthur, representing all the Allied nations, steps to the microphone and addresses the gathering.

From his perch on Missouri’s bridge, Navy photographer Lieutenant C.A. Poots preserved for posterity the entire ceremony, creating a unique record of one of history’s truly memorable events.

  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 7-29
324. At 9:04 A.M., the Japanese are invited to sign the Instrument of Surrender.

Confused as to where to sign, Shigemitsu fumbles for his fountain pen, while Kase points out the correct place on the English copy. The delegation appears somewhat more relaxed. Saburo Ohta in his white suit, hidden in 7-28, stands at left on the third row, hat in hand. Note the scaffolding at right, built for the military and press photographer.

  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 7-30
325. Stooped over the table despite the discomfort of his artificial leg, Shigemitsu signs the Japanese copy of the surrender.
  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 7-31
326. At 9:06, General Umezu signs for Imperial General Headquarters.
  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 7-32
327. At 9:08, MacArthur signs for all the Allied nations while a solemn assembly of officers looks on.
  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 7-33
328. At 9:12, Nimitz signs the Japanese copy of the surrender for the United States of America while MacArthur looks on from behind the microphone.
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-34
329. At 9:13, General Hsu Yung-chang signs for China.
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-35
330. At 9:14, Admiral Sir Bruce Fraser signs for the United Kingdom.
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-36
331. At 9:16, Lieutenant General Kuzma Nikolaivich Derevyenko signs for the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.
  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 7-37
332. At 9:17, General Sir Thomas Blamey signs for Australia. [80-G-332707]
  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 7-38
333. At 9:18, Colonel L. Moore Cosgrave signs for Canada signed the Japanese copy; he inadvertently skipped one space, displacing the last four signatures – an error the Japanese caught at the last minute. [80-G-332708]
  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 7-39
334. At 9:20, General Jacques Leclerc signs for France.
  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 7-40
335. At 9:21, Admiral Conrad Helfrich signs for the Netherlands. Last to sign was Air Vice Marshall Sir L.M. Isitt for New Zealand.
  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 7-41
336. A nervous footnote to the ceremony. As Shigemitsu and Kase look on, Sutherland corrects the Japanese copy of the surrender, marred by the Canadian signatory’s error.
  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 7-42
337. American aircraft appear over Missouri following the surrender ceremony.

Note the victory tally on the bridge and the thirty-star flag, the same banner raised by Commodore Perry at Tokyo on July 14, 1853. It was too fragile to fly, so was displayed on the bulkhead. [111-SC-211875; 111-SC-210644]

  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 7-43A-B
338. Naval aircraft fly over Missouri after the surrender.

Note the destroyers standing by to take off the press and dignitaries.

  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-44
339. Aircraft over Ancon (AGC-4), hardy veteran of amphibious operations off Morocco, Sicily, Normandy, and Okinawa.
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-45
340. The Japanese delegation receives honors as it leaves Missouri at the conclusion of the surrender ceremony shortly before 9:30.
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-46
341. Japanese on Lansdowne return to Yokohama.

Note Saburo Ohta in his white suit, at center.

  • Page number: 145
  • Photo number: 7-47
342. MacArthur departs Missouri at 9:58.
  • Page number: 145
  • Photo number: 7-48
343. Plaque affixed over the surrender site on the deck of Missouri in October 1945.
  • Page number: 145
  • Photo number: 7-49
344. The Instrument of Surrender that ended World War II [80-G-701058; 80-G-701057]
  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 7-50A-B
345. Colonel Bernard Thielen presents the Instrument of Surrender to President Truman after escorting the document during its long flight from Japan.

Also present are (l-r): Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal, Secretary of War Henry Stimson, General George C. Marshall, Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, Acting Secretary of State Dean Acheson, General A.A. Vandegrift, USMC, Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, and Lieutenant General Ira C. Eaker.

  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 7-51
346. Japanese soldiers returning to their Tokyo homes, pushing a cart loaded with their gear, passing one of the hundreds of demolished areas in the city.
  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 8-1
347. Lieutenant General Tomoyuki Yamashita (left center wearing dark coat and white shirt) is arraigned before the War Crimes Commission in Manila.

The members of this tribunal are (l-r): Brigadier General E.F. Bullens, Major General C.L. Sturdevant, Major General Russell B. Reynolds, Major General J.A. Lester, and Brigadier General W.G. Walker.

  • Page number: 148
  • Photo number: 8-2
348. Helena Rodriguez testifies concerning a Japanese atrocity.

Prosecuting attorney is Captain Delmas Wamege.

  • Page number: 148
  • Photo number: 8-3
349. Children orphaned in the bombing of Kumamoto pose with a nurse.
  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 8-4
350. Two women and a small child attend a Shinto memorial services held in the bank building for the blast victims.
  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 8-5
351. An Atomic bomb survivor awaits treatment at a temporary hospital.
  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 8-6
352. Blast victims rest on straw mats in a Hiroshima bank, Kango Ginku.

Navy lieutenant Wayne Miller took this and the following three photos.

  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 8-7
353. A man rests while reading in the bank building.

Note the bowl and chopsticks beside his mat.

  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 8-8
354. Flies cover everything in the makeshift hospital.
  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 8-9
355. A number of bombing victims – mostly soldiers occupy Hiroshima’s main train station.
  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 8-10
356. Two nurses and a doctor treat less seriously burned individuals in Hiroshima’s Red Cross Hospital.
  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 8-11
357. Many patients at the Red Cross Hospital had to be treated outside.
  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 8-12
358. A young man from Nagasaki exhibits scars typical of many burn victims.
  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 8-13
359. Note that while this man’s clothing protected him in part, his shirt, open at the neck, exposed him to burns which resulted in the keliod on his chest.
  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 8-14
360. The road to recovery was difficult for the many who suffered serious burns around their joints.
  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 8-15
361. In the case of this woman, grafting was only partly successful and led to extensive scarring.
  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 8-16
362. Major General Orvil A. Anderson, head of the USSBS Military Analysis Division.
  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 8-17
363. Rear Admiral Ralph J. Ofstie, head of the USSBS Naval Analysis Division.

Shown here as a captain in February 1944, while commanding USS Essex (CV-9) during strikes on Truk.

  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 8-18
364. Two American Strategic Bombing Survey officers examine damage in Hiroshima.

The Commercial Display Building is in the background.

  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 8-19
365. A Japanese soldier walking through a leveled portion of Hiroshima.

Lieutenant Wayne Miller, USNR, took this picture during September 1945.

  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 8-20
366. On September 26, 1945, Photographer’s Mate Third Class George Almarez, USS Appalachian (AGC-1) snapped an attempt to return to normalcy in Hiroshima.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 8-21
367. Australian prisoners of war en route home.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 8-22
368. Nurses from the 308th General Hospital sleep on the ground pending construction of proper quarters.
  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 8-23
369. An Army delegation greets Danny Kaye at Hiroshima on October 25, 1945.
  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 8-24
370. Members of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission gather for a luncheon given by the assistant mayor of Hiroshima on December 6, 1946.

Kneeling (l-r) are a city official, Lieutenant F. Ullrich, Lieutenant J. Neel, Dr. Tsuzuki. Standing (l-r) are Mr. Saida, a city official, Colonel H. Johnson, Dr. R. S. Hinshaw, Dr. A. Brues, Dr. H. Volk, Dr Matsubayashi, Lieutenant Block, Dr. Omura.

  • Page number: 154
  • Photo number: 8-25
371. Officers from the USSBS huddle together near ground zero and examine the devastation in Nagasaki.

Compare this scene with the left portion of the panorama in 5-33.

  • Page number: 155
  • Photo number: 8-26
372. Survey personnel inspect a double-track railroad bridge lying across a small tributary of the Urakami River near ground zero.
  • Page number: 155
  • Photo number: 8-27
373. An American officer points to capitals on a wall of Urakami Cathedral from which two columns were blown away at left.

Note Chinzei School on the hill beyond.

  • Page number: 155
  • Photo number: 8-28
374. First Lieutenant D.A. McGovern of Buffalo, New York (port of the newsreel pool), prepared to take some movie footage amid the devastation of Nagasaki.
  • Page number: 156
  • Photo number: 8-29
375. Nagasaki, spring 1946.

New shoots grow from a chestnut 2,000 feet from ground zero.

  • Page number: 156
  • Photo number: 8-30
376. View looking north up the Urakami River toward Nagasaki on August 3, 1946.

Note new construction in the area east of the old Mitsubishi Steel and Armament Works. The wreckage of the plant has not yet been cleared.

  • Page number: 157
  • Photo number: 8-31
377. Slowly, a portion of the cultural infrastructure of Hiroshima and Nagasaki experienced a resurrection.

Here, the rebuilt Urakami Church stands complete on May 29, 1949.

  • Page number: 157
  • Photo number: 8-32
378. Two years after the explosion over Nagasaki, agricultural expert Takeo Furuno holds up a sesame stalk at left, grown in a field 300 yards from the hypocenter.

The results presaged human genetic disorders extending out for generations.

  • Page number: 157
  • Photo number: 8-33
379. A portion of the command crew of the 509th Composite Group after the war

(l-r): Major Van Kirk, navigator; Lieutenant James W. Anderson copilot (he actually flew in No. 91 on August 6, 1945); Major Ferebee, bombardier; Colonel Tibbets, pilot. Ferebee, looking substantially older, has shaved off his mustache.

  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 8-34
380. The atomic bomb pilots and their bombardiers (l-r): Sweeney, Seaham, Ferebee, and Tibbets.
  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 8-35
390. Nagasaki pilot and copilot after the war – Captain Charles Albury (left; promoted from first lieutenant since the mission), and Major Sweeney.
  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 8-36
391. Enola Gay enjoys a spot on center stage at the National Air Fair at O’Hare Field in Chicago, July 3, 1949.

Present (l-r) are Mr. Carl Mitman of the Smithsonian Institution; Tibbets; Ferebee; and Major General Emmett J. O’Donnell.

  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 8-37
392. In the 1952 movie Above and Beyond, Hollywood produced a mix of wartime romance and a great story of American ingenuity and heroics.

Note that Tibbets (Robert Taylor) has not yet been promoted to full colonel, an event which (in the movie) elicited a tantrum from the moody Mrs. Tibbets (Eleanor Parker).

  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 8-38
393. A view looking across the Motoyasu River toward the Hiroshima Commercial Display Building.
  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 8-39
394. Exposed to the elements, the supporting framework of the dome slowly rusts away.
  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 8-40
395. Likewise open to the weather, the masonry walls crumble with the passage of time.
  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 8-41
396. Japanese tourists pause in front of the dome and ponder the past and future.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 8-42
397. Just across the Motoyasu River from the A-bomb Dome, youngsters cluster around the Peace Bell at Hiroshima.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 8-43
398. Solemn observes gather in the rain at the Children’s Peace Monument.
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 8-44
399. Atop the monolithic sculpture stands a young girl with a representation of an origami bird supported in her hands.
  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 8-45
400. Eerie and surreal, the Children’s Peace Monument sculptures are reminiscent of the corpses found by the thousands in the aftermath of the explosions.
  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 8-46
401. Still farther south, the Memorial Monument for Hiroshima is dedicated to all victims of the first atomic bomb.
  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 8-47
402. The Memorial Monument with the Commercial Display Building ruin in the background. [Goldstein 30]
  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 8-48
403. The Memorial Monument is a popular place for reflection, and draws many groups of Japanese students, easily identified here by their school garb.
  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 8-49
404. The Hiroshima Peace memorial Museum houses a diverse collection of artifacts and photography from the bombing’s aftermath.
  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 8-50
405. A child’s jumper in the museum display. [Goldstein 31]
  • Page number: 164
  • Photo number: 8-51
406. A child’s jacket shows the effect of the blast on individuals within a mile and a half of the hypocenter.

Those closer in frequently had clothing burned away or blown off. [Goldstein 8]

  • Page number: 164
  • Photo number: 8-52
407. The crushed remains of bicycle recovered from the ruins of Hiroshima.
  • Page number: 164
  • Photo number: 8-53
408. The older generation, with physical and mental scars, and firsthand memories of the A-Bomb, dwindles with every passing year.
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-54
409. Japanese schoolgirls at the memorial. [Goldstein 5]
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-55
410. Younger generations have been inculcated with the history of the Hiroshima bombing from a very early age.
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-56
Folder 3-6 Extras, 1939 - 1993
Folder 7-8 Negatives, undated
Folder 9 Slides, 1993
Folder 10 Photocopied, 1945- 1952

Section: Target Tokyo: The Story of the Sorge Spy Ring

Folder 11 Published Images, 1930s - 1945
1. The house at Adjikent near Baku where Richard Sorge was born.
  • Page number: P1
  • Photo number: 1
2. Richard at eight years with his father, Adolf Sorge.
  • Page number: P2
  • Photo number: 2
3. Richard Sorge as a young soldier during World War I.
  • Page number: P2
  • Photo number: 3
4. Sorge on his twenty-third birthday, October 1918.
  • Page number: P3
  • Photo number: 4
5. Sorge (at rear) in a hospital during World War I.
  • Page number: P3
  • Photo number: 5
6. Richard Sorge in October 1933 at the outset of his mission in Japan.
  • Page number: P4
  • Photo number: 6
7. Sorge's passport, 1937.
  • Page number: P4
  • Photo number: 7
8. Sorge during the period of his espionage ring in Tokyo, circa 1937.
  • Page number: P5
  • Photo number: 8
9. Sorge's second wife, Ykaterina ("Katcha") Maximova, standing over her two sisters.
  • Page number: P6
  • Photo number: 9
10. Façade of the German Embassy in Tokyo in 1938.
  • Page number: P7
  • Photo number: 10
11. Seiichi Ichijima, governor of Sugamo Prison.
  • Page number: P7
  • Photo number: 11
12. Anna Clausen.
  • Page number: P8
  • Photo number: 12
13. Max Clausen during period of espionage in Tokyo.
  • Page number: P8
  • Photo number: 13
14. Hanako Ishii, Sorge's companion for many years, with Professor Gordon Prange.

Ishii wrote a book on her life with Sorge.

  • Page number: P9
  • Photo number: 14
15. Sample of Clausen's encoding work sheets.
  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 15
16. Max Clausen's radio sets: transmitter on left, receiver on right.
  • Page number: P10
  • Photo number: 16
17. Hotzumi Ozaki.
  • Page number: P11
  • Photo number: 17
18. Branko de Voukelitch.
  • Page number: P11
  • Photo number: 18
19. One of the last pictures taken of Richard Sorge.
  • Page number: P12
  • Photo number: 19

Section: The Way it Was: Pearl Harbor, The Original Photographs

Folder 12-22 Published Images, 1930s - 1960s
1. Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, commander in chief, Combined Fleet, originator of the plan to attack Pearl Harbor.
  • Page number: 1
  • Photo number: 1-1
2. Rear Admiral Takijiro Onishi, chief of staff, 11th Air Fleet
  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-2
3. Commander Minoru Genda, air staff officer, 1st Air Fleet
  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-3
4. Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo, commander in chief, 1st Air Fleet
  • Page number: 2
  • Photo number: 1-4
5. Rear Admiral Ryunosuke Kusaka, chief of staff, 1st Air Fleet
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-5
6. Rear Admiral Tamon Yamaguchi, commander, 2nd Carrier Division
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-6
7. Rear Admiral Chuichi Hara, commander, 5th Carrier Division
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-7
8. Vice Admiral Gunichi Mikawa, commander, 3rd Battleship Division
  • Page number: 3
  • Photo number: 1-8
9. Rear Admiral Sentaro Omori, commander, 1st Destroyer Squadron
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-9
10. Rear Admiral Shigeyoshi Miwa, commander, 3rd Submarine Squadron
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-10
11. Commander Mitsuo Fuchida, commander, 1st Air Fleet
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-11
12. Admiral Husband Kimmel, commander in chief, Pacific Fleet (center), flanked by his operations officer, Captain Walter Delany (left), and his chief of staff, captain William Ward Smith (right)
  • Page number: 4
  • Photo number: 1-12
13. Admiral James Richardson, Kimmel’s predecessor
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-13
14. Rear Admiral Claude Bloch, commander of the 14th Naval District
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-14
15. Vice Admiral William Pye, commander, Battle Force
  • Page number: 5
  • Photo number: 1-15
16. Vice Admiral William Halsey, commander, Aircraft, Battle Force
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-16
17. Rear Admiral Patrick Bellinger, commander, Patrol Wing Two
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-17
18. Lt. General Walter Short, commanding general, Hawaiian Department (left), with Kimmel (right), Captain Lord Louis Mountbatten (center), Major General Frederick Martin, and Bellinger in September 1941.
  • Page number: 6
  • Photo number: 1-18
19. Major General Frederick Martin, commanding general, Hawaiian Air Force
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-19
20. Brigadier General Jacob Rudolph, commanding general, 18th Bombardment Wing
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-20
21. Brigadier General Howard Davidson, commanding general, 14th Pursuit Wing
  • Page number: 7
  • Photo number: 1-21
22. The aircraft carrier Akagi, flagship of the Pearl harbor Strike Force
  • Page number: 8-9
  • Photo number: 2-1
23. Kaga, companion to Akagi in the 1st Carrier Division
  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 2-2
24. Soryu, lead ship in the 2nd Carrier Division
  • Page number: 8
  • Photo number: 2-3
25. Hiryu of the 2nd Carrier Division
  • Page number: 9
  • Photo number: 2-4
26. Shokaku, flagship of the 5th Carrier Division
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 2-5
27. Zuikakuof the 5th Carrier Division
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 2-6
28. Hiei, flagship of the Pearl Harbor Support Force
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 2-7
29. Kirishima of the Pearl Harbor Support Force
  • Page number: 10
  • Photo number: 2-8
30. The heavy cruiser Tone
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 2-9
31. The heavy cruiser Chikuma
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 2-10
32. The light cruiser Abukuma, flagship of the 1st Destroyer Squadron
  • Page number: 11
  • Photo number: 2-11
33. Isokaze, a destroyer
  • Page number: 12-13
  • Photo number: 2-12
34. Shiranuhi takes on fuel from a tanker
  • Page number: 12
  • Photo number: 2-13
35. A “Zero” from Akagi
  • Page number: 12
  • Photo number: 2-14
36. A “Val” from Akagi
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 2-15
37. A “Kate” from Akagi
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 2-16
38. Type 91 Kai Model 2 torpedoes rest on board Akagi’s flight deck. Note Hiryu in the background.
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 2-17
39. Type 99 Number 80 Mark III bomb
  • Page number: 13
  • Photo number: 2-18
40. California (BB-40), moored to TenTen Pier in Pearl Harbor in August 1941
  • Page number: 14
  • Photo number: 2-19
41. Oklahoma (BB-37) at left and Nevada (BB-36) lie moored to the quays along Ford Island on 3 November 1941
  • Page number: 14
  • Photo number: 2-20
42. Utah (AG-16) being painted into Measure 1 camouflage at Mare Island in 1941
  • Page number: 14
  • Photo number: 2-21
43. New Orleans (CA-32)
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 2-22
44. St. Louis (CL-49) in the summer of 1941
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 2-23
45. The light cruiser Detroit (CL-8)
  • Page number: 15
  • Photo number: 2-24
46. MacDonough (DD-351), a Farragut class destroyer
  • Page number: 16
  • Photo number: 2-25
47. Phelphs (DD-360), a Porter class destroyer
  • Page number: 16
  • Photo number: 2-26
48. Conyngham (DD-371), a Mahan class destroyer
  • Page number: 16
  • Photo number: 2-27
49. Ralph Talbot (DD-390), a Gridley class destroyer
  • Page number: 16-17
  • Photo number: 2-28
50. Montgomery (DM-17) moored with 3 other minecraft in Pearl Harbor in early 1941
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-29
51. Flush-deck destroyers Chew (DD-106), at left, and Ward (DD-139) at Hilo in July 1941.
  • Page number: 17
  • Photo number: 2-30
52. Dolphin (SS-169)
  • Page number: 16-17
  • Photo number: 2-31
53. Oglala (CM-4)
  • Page number: 18
  • Photo number: 2-32
54. The hospital ship Solace (AH-5)
  • Page number: 18
  • Photo number: 2-33
55. The Curtiss P-40B
  • Page number: 18
  • Photo number: 2-34
56. The Curtiss P-36A
  • Page number: 18-19
  • Photo number: 2-35
57. The Douglas B-18 “Bolo”
  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-36
58. The Boeing B-17D “Flying Fortress”
  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-37
59. Douglas A-20A “Havoc”
  • Page number: 19
  • Photo number: 2-38
60. The Grumman F4F-3 “Wildcat”
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-39
61. Douglas SBD-1 “Dauntless”
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-40
62. Vought SB2U-3 “Vindicator”
  • Page number: 20
  • Photo number: 2-41
63. Consolidated PBY-5 “Catalina”
  • Page number: 20-21
  • Photo number: 2-42
64. An OS2U-3 “Kingfisher” alongside its ship, Arizona, during exercises on 6 September 1941.
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-43
65. Grumman J2F “Duck” from the Navy utility squadron VJ-1
  • Page number: 21
  • Photo number: 2-44
66. A VJ-1 Sikorsky JRS-1 amphibian
  • Page number: 22-23
  • Photo number: 2-45
67. A 5-inch, 25-caliber AA mount
  • Page number: 22
  • Photo number: 2-46
68. A 5-inch, 38-caliber AA mount
  • Page number: 22-23
  • Photo number: 2-47
69. A 3-inch, 50-caliber AA mount
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-48
70. A 3-inch, 23-caliber AA mount
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-49
71. The 1.1-inch quadruple heavy machine-gun mount
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-50
72. Browning water-cooled, .50-caliber machine gun
  • Page number: 23
  • Photo number: 2-51
73. Pearl Harbor on 31 October 1941 with Ford Island at the center, the Navy Yard, submarine Base, and fuel oil tank farms at the left, and Hickman Field beyond the Navy Yard.
  • Page number: 24-25
  • Photo number: 3-1
74. The Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 13 October 1941
  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 3-2
75. Drydock No. 1 and Arizona in 1932
  • Page number: 25
  • Photo number: 3-3
76. Pearl Harbor’s submarine base
  • Page number: 26-27
  • Photo number: 3-4
77. Ford island on 10 November 1941 with Naval Air Station hangars at lower left
  • Page number: 26
  • Photo number: 3-5
78. Pennsylvania, flagship of the Pacific Fleet, lies moored to TenTen Pier on 11 August 1941, as seen from the Argonne
  • Page number: 26-27
  • Photo number: 3-6
79. Pearl Harbor from Argonne’s bridge on 11 August 1941, showing West Virginia, Arizona, and Oklahoma
  • Page number: 27
  • Photo number: 3-7
80. The light cruise St. Louis (right) rests beside Montgomery (right) and Breese in the Navy Yard’s Repair Basin in October 1941
  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 3-8
81. Hickam Field in October 1941, with the Hale Makai Aircrew Barracks just behind the hangar line and Hawaiian Air Depot hangars at the bottom
  • Page number: 28-29
  • Photo number: 3-9
82. Colonel William Farthing, commanding officer, Hickam Field
  • Page number: 28
  • Photo number: 3-10
83. Hickam Field’s main gate in the late 1930s
  • Page number: 28-29
  • Photo number: 3-11
84. Wheeler Field in October 1935
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 3-12
85. Colonel Williwam Flood
  • Page number: 29
  • Photo number: 3-13
86. Wheeler Field’s Noncommissioned Officers’ Club
  • Page number: 30
  • Photo number: 3-14
87. Bellows Field
  • Page number: 30-31
  • Photo number: 3-15
88. Lt. Colonel Leonard Weddington
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 3-16
89. Bellows Field’s main gate
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 3-17
90. Haleiwa Field on Oahu’s northwest coast
  • Page number: 31
  • Photo number: 3-18
91. Kaneohe Bay on 1 October 1941; note the unfinished hangar
  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 3-19
92. Commander Harold “Beauty” Martin
  • Page number: 32
  • Photo number: 3-20
93. Pearl Harbor naval Air Station, 10 October 1941, at Lt. Comdr. Kakuichi Takahashi saw it at 0755, 7 December 1941
  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 3-21
94. Captain James Shoemaker
  • Page number: 33
  • Photo number: 3-22
95. Ewa Marine Corps Air Station in October 1941
  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 3-23
96. Lt. Colonel Claude Larkin
  • Page number: 34
  • Photo number: 3-24
97. Ewa’s JRS-1 amphibian braves one of the many dust storms that plagued the base
  • Page number: 34-35
  • Photo number: 3-25
98. The city of Honolulu and its harbor on 13 January 1941
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 3-26
99. Army troops form up behind the Aloha Tower
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 3-27
100. Downtown Honolulu on 8 March 1942
  • Page number: 35
  • Photo number: 3-28
101. Anchorage plan of the Pearl Harbor Strike Force at Hitokappu Bay
  • Page number: 36
  • Photo number: 4-1
102. Hitokappu Bay, 22 November 1941 showing (left to right) Kirishima, an oiler, Kaga, and Hiei
  • Page number: 36-37
  • Photo number: 4-2
103. Hitokappu Bay seen from Zuikaku’s flight deck
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 4-3
104. Crewmen cluster about Suikaku’s wind-whipped forecastle on 26 November 1941
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 4-4
105. Akagi, flagship of the 1st Air Fleet, at Hitokappu Bay
  • Page number: 37
  • Photo number: 4-5
106. Aviators (foreground) and gun crews (right) bundled in heavy flight gear on Akagi.

Other carriers lie in the misty background (from left to right) Kaga, Shokaku, Suikaku, Hiryu, and Soryu.

  • Page number: 38
  • Photo number: 4-6
107. Kansen AI-156 on board Akagi
  • Page number: 38
  • Photo number: 4-7
108. The 1st Air Fleet under way at last from Hitokappu Bay
  • Page number: 39
  • Photo number: 4-8
109. Attempts to provide extra protection to the Akagi
  • Page number: 39
  • Photo number: 4-9
110. Gun crews at a twin 120-millimeter, 45 caliber AA mount on the Akagi’s port gallery
  • Page number: 40
  • Photo number: 4-10
111. Looking astern from the Akagi’s island, Kaga and Zuikaku steam on the horizon
  • Page number: 40-41
  • Photo number: 4-11
112. Kaga and Zuikaku surge through the whitecapped swells
  • Page number: 40-41
  • Photo number: 4-12
113. Another view of Kaga and Zuikaku headed for Hawaii
  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 4-13
114. Kenyo Maru, flagship of the 1st Supply Train tankers
  • Page number: 41
  • Photo number: 4-14
115. A destroyer form the Strike Force plunges through the northern Pacific
  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 4-15
116. Addressing men assembled on the flight deck from Shokaku’s bridge
  • Page number: 42
  • Photo number: 4-16
117. Officers talking on Shokaku’s bridge
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 4-17
118. The presence of Shokaku’s skipper lends authority to the message on the blackboard above him.
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 4-18
119. Another blackboard bears orders from the Mobile Fleet and the commander in chief
  • Page number: 43
  • Photo number: 4-19
120. Looking forward from Suikaku’s island, Kaga steams on the horizon
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 4-20
121. Akagi makes the final approach to Oahu
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 4-21
122. Akagi officers brief crew members on 6 December
  • Page number: 44
  • Photo number: 4-22
123. Lt. Ichiro Kitajima briefs Kaga’s aircrews on the torpedo attacks.

Note the chalk-drawn map of Pearl Harbor.

  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 4-23
124. Note the mattresses secured to Akagi’s island
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 4-24
125. Zuikaku’s fighter pilots in a group portrait on 6 December
  • Page number: 45
  • Photo number: 4-25
126. The Imperial Navy’s air arm poised to launch behind Lt. Saburo Shindo’s kansen on Akagi’s flight deck
  • Page number: 46-47
  • Photo number: 5-1
127. Lt. Shindo’s wingman, PO1c. Tadao Kimura, prepared for takeoff at left in AI-101.

Note the Type 99 carrier bombers further aft.

  • Page number: 48
  • Photo number: 5-2
128. Lt. Shindo was the first airman from Akagi’s second wave to take to the skies
  • Page number: 48
  • Photo number: 5-3
129. On board Akagi, a Val lifts off in the early morning sunlight
  • Page number: 49
  • Photo number: 5-4
130. At right Lt. Masao Iisuka revs up EI-104.

Note the two wide horizontal stripes of a shutai-cho, or division commander

  • Page number: 49
  • Photo number: 5-5
131. Plane handlers on the Shokaku spot bomb-laden B5N2 kanko on the flight deck
  • Page number: 50
  • Photo number: 5-6
132. The Emperor’s Sea Eagles rush to man Shokaku’s second-wave aircraft.

Note the ship’s bell in the background at left.

  • Page number: 50
  • Photo number: 5-7
133. B5N2s prepare for takeoff.

Two squadron-leader stripes distinguish Lt. Ichihara’s aircraft.

  • Page number: 50
  • Photo number: 5-8
134. Shokaku’s air officer signals takeoff
  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 5-9
135. The last fighter of Shokaku’s combat air patrol delays second-wave takeoff.

Deck crews crouch under passing wings.

  • Page number: 51
  • Photo number: 5-10
136. Lt. Ichihara’s wingman, PO2c. Satoru Okimura, pushes his throttle forward and follows Ichihara
  • Page number: 52
  • Photo number: 5-11
137. Lt. Ichihara’s wingman, PO2c. Satoru Okimura, pushes his throttle forward and follows Ichihara
  • Page number: 52
  • Photo number: 5-12
138. Men of the 5th Carrier Division exhort their comrades in an outburst of patriotic emotion
  • Page number: 53
  • Photo number: 5-13
139. Two bombers from Akagi with their enormous Type 99 Model 80-5 800-kilogram, armor-piercing bombs.
  • Page number: 52
  • Photo number: 5-14
140. The midget submarine crewmen of the Special Naval Attack Unit
  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 5-15
141. Arrangement of the 5 midget submarines
  • Page number: 54
  • Photo number: 5-16
142. Ward, photographed 26 February 1919, painted in peacetime light grey
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 5-17
143. Antares, during WWII
  • Page number: 55
  • Photo number: 5-18
144. Lt. William Goepner
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 5-19
145. Lt. William Outerbridge, c. 1942
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 5-20
146. The crew of Ward’s gun No. 3
  • Page number: 56-57
  • Photo number: 5-21
147. Ward’s track chart from the midget submarine incident
  • Page number: 57
  • Photo number: 5-22
148. Ens. William Tanner’s PBY-5 14-P-1
  • Page number: 58-59
  • Photo number: 5-23
149. William Tanner as a captain in 1959
  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 5-24
150. Ens. Robert Clark, c. 1941
  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 5-25
151. Donald Butler as a commander in 1961
  • Page number: 58
  • Photo number: 5-26
152. Ens. Akira Hiro
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 5-27
153. PO2c. Yoshio Katayama
  • Page number: 59
  • Photo number: 5-28
154. Ward’s radio message
  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 5-29
155. Lt. Commander Harold Kaminski, watch officer in Rear Admiral Bloch’s headquarters
  • Page number: 60
  • Photo number: 5-30
156. Private Joseph Lockard in early 1942
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 5-31
157. The Opana radar plot from 7 December 1941
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 5-32
158. Lt. Kermit Tyler
  • Page number: 61
  • Photo number: 5-33
159. Smoke boils up from the aircraft clustered around Hangar 6 on Ford Island
  • Page number: 62-63
  • Photo number: 6-1
160. Rear Admiral William Furlong
  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 6-2
161. Lt. Commander Logan Ramsey
  • Page number: 62
  • Photo number: 6-3
162. Lt. Iwakichi Mifuku, leader, 22nd Section, Shokaku dive-bombers
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 6-4
163. Diagram depicting the attack on Hickam Field
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 6-5
164. The assault on Hickam Field begins
  • Page number: 63
  • Photo number: 6-6
165. Lt. Commander Shigeru Itaya, leader, first-wave fighter unit from Akagi and overall commander of the first-wave fighters
  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 6-7
166. Lt. Masanobu Ibusuki, shown here during 1945
  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 6-8
167. Lt. Akira Sakamoto, leader, Zuikaku dive-bombing unit
  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 6-9
168. Lt. Tomatsu Ema, one of Sakamoto’s two division leaders
  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 6-10
169. Lt. Kiyokima Okajima, leader, Hiryu fighter unit of the first-wave
  • Page number: 64
  • Photo number: 6-11
170. Diagram of the attack on Wheeler Field
  • Page number: 65
  • Photo number: 6-12
171. Aircraft of the 18th Pursuit Wing go up in flames
  • Page number: 66-67
  • Photo number: 6-13
172. Wheeler Field under attack
  • Page number: 66
  • Photo number: 6-14
173. Lt. Yoshio Shiga, leader, first-wave fighters from Kaga
  • Page number: 66
  • Photo number: 6-15
174. Ewa marine Air Corps Station, seen from a torpedo-laden kanko from Kaga
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 6-16
175. Ewa marines defend themselves with rifles
  • Page number: 67
  • Photo number: 6-17
176. Lt. Tadashi Kaneko, leader, Shokaku fighter unit
  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 6-18
177. Lt. Masao Sato, leader, Zuikaku fighter unit
  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 6-19
178. A PBY-5 from VP-14 at NAS Kaneohe Bay
  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 6-20
179. The remains of a PBY-5 at Kaneohe, set afire by incendiary ammunition
  • Page number: 68
  • Photo number: 6-21
180. Lt. Commander Shigeharu Murata, leader, Akagi torpedo bombing unit, and overall leader of the torpedo attack
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 6-22
181. Lt. Kazuyoshi Kitajima, leader, Kaga torpedo bombing unit
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 6-23
182. Lt. Tsuyoshi Nagai, leader, Soryu torpedo bombing unit
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 6-24
183. Lt. Heita Matsumura, leader, Hiryu torpedo bombing unit
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 6-25
184. Three kanko lumber around the western side of Oahu toward their objective in Pearl Harbor
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 6-26
185. Torpedo bombers in nearing the Pearl Harbor entrance channel
  • Page number: 69
  • Photo number: 6-27
186. Two Akagi kanko meet with success
  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 6-28
187. The bugle call “General Quarters”
  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 6-29
188. A view from southwest of Ford Island shows ships moored along Ford Island sustaining blows from both the northwest and the southeast
  • Page number: 70
  • Photo number: 6-30
189. Battleships lined up like “ducks in a shooting gallery”
  • Page number: 71
  • Photo number: 6-31
190. Kaga aircraft AII-356, flown by Lt. Mimori Suzuki, pulled form the waters of the southeast loch
  • Page number: 72-73
  • Photo number: 6-32
191. Utah listing after 2 torpedo hits
  • Page number: 72
  • Photo number: 6-33
192. Utah capsizing at 0810
  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 6-34
193. Medal of Honor winner Chief Watertender Peter Tomish of Utah
  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 6-35
194. Lt. Claude Ricketts shown here after the war
  • Page number: 73
  • Photo number: 6-36
195. Lt. Hideo Maki, leader, Second Chutai, Kaga horizontal bombing unit
  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 6-38
196. Lt. Heijiro Abe, leader, Soryu horizontal bombing unit
  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 6-39
197. Lt. Commander Tadashi Kusumi, leader, Hiryu horizontal bombing unit
  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 6-40
198. The battleships as seen by Fuchida and his men 10,000 feet above the harbor
  • Page number: 74
  • Photo number: 6-41
199. Arizona shortly before her explosion
  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 6-42
200. A bomb exploding in Arizona’s forecastle detonates her forward magazines
  • Page number: 75
  • Photo number: 6-43
201. Consumed in the conflagration, Arizona lies at the north end of Battleship Row
  • Page number: 76
  • Photo number: 6-44
202. A clock recovered from Arizona
  • Page number: 76
  • Photo number: 6-45
203. Damage to the center-line gun of Tennessee’s No. 2 turret
  • Page number: 76
  • Photo number: 6-46
204. Shrapnel mortally wounded West Virginia skipper Captain Mervyn Bennion
  • Page number: 77
  • Photo number: 6-47
205. Mess Attendant 2c. Doris Miller waits to receive the Navy Cross
  • Page number: 77
  • Photo number: 6-48
206. Horizontal bombers from Kaga fly toward the rendezvous area.

Antiaircraft fire spots the sky over the harbor. Note smoke from Hickam Field and Battleship Row

  • Page number: 77
  • Photo number: 6-49
207. Smoke obscures battleships forward of Arizona
  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 6-50
208. Ships on the northwest side of Ford Island between 0820 and 0840.

Utah (left) has turned turtle while Raleigh lists discernibly to port.

  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 6-51
209. Battleship Row
  • Page number: 78
  • Photo number: 6-52
210. Lt. Commander Samuel Fuqua of Arizona
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 6-53
211. Damage from bomb splinters scars the area surrounding the Tennessee’s conning tower
  • Page number: 79
  • Photo number: 6-54
212. California holds her own at about 0830
  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 6-55
213. Beyond California Old Glory still waves
  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 6-56
214. Battleship Row behind the smoke.

The seaplane tender Avocet in the foreground was one of the first ships to fire on the torpedo planes.

  • Page number: 80
  • Photo number: 6-57
215. Major Truman Landon in 1943
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 6-58
216. Major Richard Carmichael in 1942
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 6-59
217. A B-17 from the West Coast flight comes under attack
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 6-60
218. Lt. Shoichi Ogawa, leader of the Second Chutai of Kaga’s second-wave dive-bombers
  • Page number: 81
  • Photo number: 6-61
219. Bombers near one of the Hamilton Field, California, B-17s
  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 6-62
220. Lt. Karl Barthelmess
  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 6-63
221. Staff Sergeant Lee Embree
  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 6-64
222. A B-17E heads northwest toward Haleiwa Field
  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 6-65
223. Carmichael’s wingman, Lt. Harold Chaffin
  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 6-66
224. Lt. Bruce Allen
  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 6-67
225. Pilot Raymond Swenson
  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 6-68
226. Captain Raymond Swenson’s B-17C.

Itaya claimed credit for its destruction.

  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 6-69
227. Co-pilot Earnest Reid
  • Page number: 82
  • Photo number: 6-70
228. Lt. Barthelmess’s crew after landing at Hickam Field.

One of Hickam’s B-17Ds that escaped the morning attacks sits in the background.

  • Page number: 83
  • Photo number: 6-71
229. Kansen AI-154 flown by PO1c.

Takeshi Hirano of Akagi

  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 6-72
230. Lt. Robert Richards
  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 6-73
231. B-17C at Bellows Field, piloted by Robert Richards
  • Page number: 84
  • Photo number: 6-74
232. Lt. Commander Howard Young (right) with VS-6 skipper Lt. Commander Hallsted Hopping in late 1941
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 6-75
233. SBD-2 (BuNo 2162), the aircraft Young flew into Oahu on 7 December 1941
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 6-76
234. Lt. Masaji Suganami, leader, first-wave fighter unit from Soryu
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 6-77
235. Ens. John Vogt
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 6-78
236. RM3c. Sidney Pierce
  • Page number: 85
  • Photo number: 6-79
237. Lt. Clarence Dickinson
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 6-81
238. RM1c. William Miller
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 6-82
239. SBD-3 (BuNo 4570) flown by Dickinson and Miller
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 6-83
240. Ens. John McCarthy
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 6-84
241. RM3c. Mitchell Cohn
  • Page number: 86
  • Photo number: 6-85
242. McCarthy and Cohn’s SBD-2 (BuNo 2158).

The card attached to the wreckage reads, “Navy crash 7 December 1941 investigation completed. Do not remove this sign.”

  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 6-86
243. Lt. Frank Patriarca
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 6-87
244. Burns Field on 26 August 1941
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 6-88
245. Ens. Walter Willis
  • Page number: 87
  • Photo number: 6-89
246. Ens. Manuel Gonzales
  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 6-90
247. RM3c. Leonard Kozelek and his shipmate RM3c. Audrey Coslett
  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 6-91
248. Ens. Edward Deacon, on board Enterprise, January 1942
  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 6-92
249. Ens. Carlton Fogg, c. 24 January 1942.

Fogg would be dead within a week, shot down in the Marshalls.

  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 6-94
250. Ground crews at Ewa service and arm Ens. Carlton Fogg’s SBD, aircraft 6-S-11
  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 6-95
251. SBD crash site
  • Page number: 88
  • Photo number: 6-93
252. Honolulu residents look toward Pearl Harbor
  • Page number: 89
  • Photo number: 6-96
253. Pearl Harbor from the north at about 0830
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 6-97
254. Commander John Phillips
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 6-98
255. Neosho pulls clear of the gasoline wharf at Ford Island shortly after 0842
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 6-99
256. Men disembarking on the southern end of Ford Island.

Note Neosho at right.

  • Page number: 90-91
  • Photo number: 6-100
257. Lt. Commander William Burford in 1953
  • Page number: 90
  • Photo number: 6-101
258. Monaghan at Mare Island on 17 February 1942
  • Page number: 92-93
  • Photo number: 6-102
259. Monaghan’s engagement with the midget submarine
  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 6-103
260. The midget submarine rammed by Monaghan.

Depth-charge detonations produced the washboard effect on the submarine’s hull.

  • Page number: 92
  • Photo number: 6-104
261. Curtiss scored a direct hit on the midget submarine at 0840
  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 6-105
262. Ens. Kazuo Sakamaki
  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 6-106
263. PO2c. Kiyoshi Inagaki
  • Page number: 93
  • Photo number: 6-107
264. The midget submarine commanded by Ens. Kazuo Sakamaki at Bellows
  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 6-108
265. Lt. Masaharu Yokoyama
  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 6-109
266. PO2c. Tei Ueda
  • Page number: 94
  • Photo number: 6-110
267. Looking west toward Hangar 1, NAS Kaneohe Bay
  • Page number: 95
  • Photo number: 6-111
268. The fire area at Hangar 1
  • Page number: 96
  • Photo number: 6-112
269. Fire fighters at work in front of Kaneohe’s Hangar 1
  • Page number: 96-97
  • Photo number: 6-113
270. Salvage efforts at Kaneohe
  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 6-114
271. Ground personnel at Ewa rescue an aircraft
  • Page number: 97
  • Photo number: 6-115
272. Lt. Commander Francis Thomas
  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 7-1
273. Chief Boatswain Edwin Hill
  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 7-2
274. Nevada moves down Battleship Row
  • Page number: 98-99
  • Photo number: 7-3
275. Nevada (right) continues down the channel beside Battleship Row
  • Page number: 99
  • Photo number: 7-4
276. Looking toward the Navy Yard from parking lot
  • Page number: 100
  • Photo number: 7-5
277. Seen from Ford Island’s water tower, Nevada passes TenTen Pier at 0900.

The seaplane tender Avocet is at lower right.

  • Page number: 100
  • Photo number: 7-6
278. Lt. Saburo Makino
  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 7-7
279. Nevada’s war damage.

The chart confirms that only the aircraft attacking out of the sun scored hits.

  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 7-8
280. Kaga’s dive-bombers assault Nevada
  • Page number: 101
  • Photo number: 7-9
281. Nevada presses on, despite attacks from plane after plane
  • Page number: 102
  • Photo number: 7-10
282. Fires onboard Nevada (left) burn fiercely as a dive-bomber pulls out to the west to escape AA fire (far right) and a bomb detonates in the floating drydock (center right).
  • Page number: 102-103
  • Photo number: 7-11
283. A near miss on Nevada’s starboard bow veils the ship from view
  • Page number: 103
  • Photo number: 7-12
284. Nevada prepares to run aground
  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 7-13
285. Nevada (center) noses into Hospital Point.

Note Argonne at far left.

  • Page number: 104
  • Photo number: 7-14
286. Nevada runs aground
  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 7-15
287. The harbor’s current pulls Nevada into the channel
  • Page number: 105
  • Photo number: 7-16
288. Nevada swings around, revealing Shaw at center
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 7-17
289. Pennsylvania in Drydock No. 1
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 7-18
290. Neosho stands down the channel
  • Page number: 106
  • Photo number: 7-19
291. Lt. Takehiko Chihaya, leader, Akagi dive-bombers
  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 7-20
292. Akagi bombers strike ships moored northwest of Ford Island.

Note Nevada’s empty berth at left. A kanbanku diving on Curtiss is circled at upper left.

  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 7-21
293. An Akagi bomber crashes on Curtiss
  • Page number: 107
  • Photo number: 7-22
294. Smoke marks the impact point on Curtiss
  • Page number: 108
  • Photo number: 7-23
295. Curtiss burning.

Note Medusa at right.

  • Page number: 108
  • Photo number: 7-24
296. A bomb just misses Tangier
  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 7-25
297. Tangier’s bridge
  • Page number: 109
  • Photo number: 7-26
298. Shaw continues to burn.

Note Nevada’s bow afire (right).

  • Page number: 110
  • Photo number: 7-27
299. Fires detonate Shaw’s forward magazines
  • Page number: 110
  • Photo number: 7-28
300. Debris flies away from the shattered destroyer.

Note garbage lighter YG-21 at left.

  • Page number: 111
  • Photo number: 7-29
301. Flames cover Shaw in one of the most spectacular combat photographs of all time.

Note Nevada’s silhouetted main battery (right).

  • Page number: 110-111
  • Photo number: 7-30
302. Second-wave attackers encounter heavy AA fire
  • Page number: 112
  • Photo number: 7-31
303. A kanbaku releases its bomb
  • Page number: 112
  • Photo number: 7-32
304. A kanbaku pulls up over the harbor
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 7-33
305. Men on Ford Island belt machine-gun ammunition
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 7-34
306. A kanbaku flies low above Ford Island
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 7-35
307. Another dive-bomber dips even lower
  • Page number: 113
  • Photo number: 7-36
308. A fighter banks steeply over Pearl Harbor
  • Page number: 114
  • Photo number: 7-37
309. Flak over Army housing near Hickam Field
  • Page number: 114
  • Photo number: 7-38
310. Aichi Type 99 bombs near Ford Island’s control tower
  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 7-39
311. A dive-bomber is shot down
  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 7-40
312. A damaged second-wave fighter over Pearl Harbor
  • Page number: 115
  • Photo number: 7-41
313. Three aircraft meet light American AA fire
  • Page number: 116-117
  • Photo number: 7-42
314. Lt. Commander Takeshige Egusa
  • Page number: 116
  • Photo number: 7-43
315. Lt. Howell Forgy, chaplain, New Orleans
  • Page number: 116
  • Photo number: 7-44
316. The Navy Yard at about 0915
  • Page number: 117
  • Photo number: 7-45
317. Neosho arrives from Ford Island
  • Page number: 117
  • Photo number: 7-46
318. A kansen from Kaga screams down over the Navy Yard and submarine base
  • Page number: 118
  • Photo number: 7-47
319. Damage to the pier alongside Honolulu.

The entry in the dock wall is circled.

  • Page number: 118-119
  • Photo number: 7-48
320. Arizona afire
  • Page number: 119
  • Photo number: 7-49
321. West Virginia (outboard of Tennessee) lies sunk but upright.

Note the overturned hull of Oklahoma at left.

  • Page number: 118-119
  • Photo number: 7-50
322. A rescuer throws a lifeline to a swimmer near West Virginia.

Note the CXAM-1 “bedspring” radar antenna atop the foremast.

  • Page number: 120
  • Photo number: 7-51
323. Smoke from West Virginia partially obscures Maryland.

This photo illustrates the difficulties AA gun crews faced during the attack.

  • Page number: 120-121
  • Photo number: 7-52
324. Captain George Rood, c. 1940
  • Page number: 120
  • Photo number: 7-53
325. St. Louis makes the turn around the Navy Yard, headed out to sea
  • Page number: 121
  • Photo number: 7-54
326. From Ford Island’s control tower east, smoke hides Battleship Row at left.

At right, California lists from two torpedoes and one bomb.

  • Page number: 122
  • Photo number: 7-55
327. Burning oil laps at California’s stern
  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 7-56
328. Interfering with efforts to keep California afloat, burning oil closes in on her stern
  • Page number: 123
  • Photo number: 7-57
329. Fire engulfs California
  • Page number: 124-125
  • Photo number: 7-58
330. California’s crew abandons ship
  • Page number: 124
  • Photo number: 7-59
331. California disappears behind a proscenium of smoke and flame
  • Page number: 125
  • Photo number: 7-60
332. Oglala falls toward TenTen Pier
  • Page number: 126
  • Photo number: 7-61
333. By 1000, Oglala collapsed onto her port side.

Jarvis is circled at left.

  • Page number: 126-127
  • Photo number: 7-62
334. Phoenix on her way to join Task Force One
  • Page number: 126
  • Photo number: 7-63
335. Phoenix’s track chart from 7 December 1941
  • Page number: 127
  • Photo number: 7-64

Box Photo 11
Folder 1-3 Published Images, 1940s
336. A rescue motor launch reaching Oklahoma and Maryland
  • Page number: 128-129
  • Photo number: 7-65
337. Small craft rescue sailors abandoning West Virginia
  • Page number: 128
  • Photo number: 7-66
338. A launch searches for swimmers off Arizona’s port bow.

Note the light grey form of the retired cruiser Baltimore (right).

  • Page number: 129
  • Photo number: 7-67
339. Battleship Row sometime after noon
  • Page number: 130-131
  • Photo number: 7-68
340. Pearl Harbor from the northeast, soon after the raid ended.

Note Nevada beached at center.

  • Page number: 130-131
  • Photo number: 7-69
341. NAS Pearl Harbor as seen from Ford Island’s water tower
  • Page number: 132-133
  • Photo number: 7-70
342. Sailors start cleaning up
  • Page number: 132
  • Photo number: 7-71
343. Smoke from Battleship Row
  • Page number: 133
  • Photo number: 7-72
344. Lt. Commander Shigekazu Shimazaki
  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 7-73
345. Pearl Harbor as the Japanese remembered it
  • Page number: 134
  • Photo number: 7-74
346. “…Our flag was still there…”
  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 7-75
347. A B-17D burns on Hickam Field’s apron
  • Page number: 135
  • Photo number: 7-76
348. View looking southwest from Hickam Parade Ground
  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 7-77
349. The aircrew barracks at Hickam
  • Page number: 136
  • Photo number: 7-78
350. Ground crews at Wheeler service a P-36A in front of Hangar 2
  • Page number: 137
  • Photo number: 7-79
351. Lt. Michio Kobayashi
  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 7-80
352. A SB2U-3 demolished on Ewa’s parking apron
  • Page number: 138-139
  • Photo number: 7-81
353. A SBD burning on Ewa’s apron
  • Page number: 138
  • Photo number: 7-82
354. Burning gasoline consumes this Lockheed JO-2 transport (BuNo 1051) at Ewa
  • Page number: 139
  • Photo number: 7-83
355. Pvt. William Turner, USMC
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-84
356. M. Sergeant Emil Peters, USMC
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-85
357. A bullet-ridden SBD-2 BuNo 2111 parked at Ewa
  • Page number: 140
  • Photo number: 7-86
358. Ewa’s 1938 Ford ambulance
  • Page number: 141
  • Photo number: 7-87
359. Lt. Fusata Iida
  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 7-88
360. Lt. Sumio Nono
  • Page number: 142
  • Photo number: 7-89
361. Second-wave Japanese bombers attack Kaneohe
  • Page number: 142-143
  • Photo number: 7-90
362. Shokaku’s kanko EI-329 at Kaneohe Bay
  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 7-91
363. Japanese view of Kaneohe
  • Page number: 143
  • Photo number: 7-92
364. Lt. Kenneth Taylor
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-93
365. 2nd Lt. George Welch
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-94
366. 2nd Lt. George Welch and 2nd Lt. Kenneth “Hominy” Taylor (nicknamed after his hometown in Oklahoma).
  • Page number: 145
  • Photo number: 7-95
367. 1st Lt. Harry Brown
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-96
368. 1st. Lt. Robert Rodgers
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-97
369. 2nd Lt. John Dains
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-98
370. 1st Lt. John Webster
  • Page number: 144
  • Photo number: 7-99
371. 2nd Lt. Hans Christiansen
  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 7-100
372. 2nd Lt. George Whiteman
  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 7-101
373. 2nd Lt. Samuel Bishop
  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 7-102
374. 2nd Lt. Bishop, the sole survivor of the Bellows trio, poses in the cockpit of another survivor of the raid, P-40B, serial 41-13308.
  • Page number: 146
  • Photo number: 7-103
375. 1st Lt. Lewis Sanders in late 1941.

At 34 he was the oldest of the Army fighter pilots who took to the skies on 7 December 1941.

  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 7-104
376. 2nd Lt. Gordon Sterling
  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 7-105
377. 2nd Lt. John Thacker
  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 7-106
378. 2nd Lt. Malcolm Moore
  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 7-107
379. 2nd Lt. Othneil Norris
  • Page number: 147
  • Photo number: 7-108
380. 2nd Lt. Philip Rasmussen as an air cadet, c. 1940
  • Page number: 148
  • Photo number: 7-109
381. 2nd Lt. Philip Rasmussen stands beside his P-36A, serial 38-86.

Notes the holes in the fuselage.

  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 7-110
382. The ground crews at Wheeler counted 544 bullet and shell holes in Rasmussen’s P-36A.
  • Page number: 149
  • Photo number: 7-111
383. Rasmussen holds up his plane’s severed rudder cables
  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 7-112
384. Five Army fighter pilots stand at Wheeler Field on 1 July 1942 after being decorated for their actions against the Japanese.
  • Page number: 150
  • Photo number: 7-113
385. Shokaku’s kanko begin the long journey back to the ship after bombing NAS Kaneohe Bay
  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 7-114
386. A kanko prepares to land on Akagi.

Note the destroyer on plane guard duty astern the carrier.

  • Page number: 151
  • Photo number: 7-115
387. A kansen touches down onto Akagi’s flight deck and heads for the barriers forward after missing the arrestor wires aft.

Note fire-fighting equipment in front of the islands.

  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 7-116
388. Incoming bombers continue to return to Akagi
  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 7-117
389. An exhausted airman on Akagi
  • Page number: 152
  • Photo number: 7-118
390. Lt. Fritz Hebel
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 7-119
391. Ens. Herbert Menges
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 7-120
392. Lt. Eric Allen Jr.
  • Page number: 153
  • Photo number: 7-121
393. Nevada at Pearl Harbor Channel Buoy 19
  • Page number: 154-155
  • Photo number: 8-1
394. California, tended by Widgeon and Swan, is very low in the water but not yet on the harbor bottom
  • Page number: 156-157
  • Photo number: 8-2
395. A rescue party stands on the forward portion of Oklahoma’s upturned hull on 8 December 1941
  • Page number: 156
  • Photo number: 8-3
396. Garbage lighter YG-17 sprays West Virginia amidships
  • Page number: 157
  • Photo number: 8-4
397. At left, minesweeper Tern (in front) and Hoga (behind) lie off Arizona’s port bow during 9 December 1941.

Solacee is in the center of the background.

  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 8-5
398. Drydock No. 1 after the attack.

Pennsylvania lies behind Cassin (right) and Downes (left)

  • Page number: 158
  • Photo number: 8-6
399. Fleet tug Sunnadin (AT-48) tends the cruiser Raleigh
  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 8-7
400. Lt. Commander Raymond Tellin, c. 1950
  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 8-8
401. A rescue party, led by Tellin, stands on Utah’s hull
  • Page number: 159
  • Photo number: 8-9
402. The destroyer Shaw burns out of control in YFD-2.

Note that the drydock is only partially sunk, listing at about 25 degrees.

  • Page number: 160-161
  • Photo number: 8-10
403. Sgt. Dean Morris reunited with his wife at Hickam Field after the attack
  • Page number: 160
  • Photo number: 8-11
404. A burned B-18 lies just outside Hangar 15
  • Page number: 161
  • Photo number: 8-12
405. A direct hit gutted Hangar 11.

The tail of Brigadier General Jacob Rudolph’s battered personal B-18 protrudes into the photo at right.

  • Page number: 162
  • Photo number: 8-13
406. On Hangar Avenue, past hangar 11 at left, water stands in the street and surrounding area from a ruptured water main.
  • Page number: 163
  • Photo number: 8-14
407. A wide-angle view of the Hale Makai Aircrew Barracks
  • Page number: 162-163
  • Photo number: 8-15
408. Many of the barracks’ casualties occurred in the crowded mess hall
  • Page number: 164
  • Photo number: 8-16
409. The remains of 4 73rd Pursuit Squadron P-40s
  • Page number: 164-165
  • Photo number: 8-17
410. Bulldozed wreckage on the apron near Hangar 3
  • Page number: 164-165
  • Photo number: 8-18
411. Captain George Boyer, U.S. Army Medical Corps with anger and determination on his features
  • Page number: 165
  • Photo number: 8-19
412. Just to the rear of the hangar line, rubble marks the site of a direct hit
  • Page number: 166
  • Photo number: 8-20
413. Machine-gun fire riddled Brigadier General Howard Davidson’s 1941 Ford “Fordor” sedan
  • Page number: 166
  • Photo number: 8-21
414. The burned-out hulk of a strafed gasoline truck on the southern side of Bellow’s runway
  • Page number: 166-167
  • Photo number: 8-22
415. A forlorn P-40C, victim of the Japanese cannon fire, rests on Bellow’s sandy ground
  • Page number: 166-167
  • Photo number: 8-23
416. Another hapless P-40 at Bellows
  • Page number: 167
  • Photo number: 8-24
417. A burned-out SB2U-3 from VMSB-231 on the asphalt at Ewa
  • Page number: 168-169
  • Photo number: 8-25
418. This 1937 LaSalle two-door touring sedan.

Charred and blistered, lies near Ewa’s parking lot.

  • Page number: 169
  • Photo number: 8-26
419. Standing in front of Ewa’s dispensary, base photographer T. Sergeant Henry Anglin holds up a Japanese 7.7-millimeter bullet.
  • Page number: 168
  • Photo number: 8-27
420. Strafing Japanese fighters disabled Kaneohe bay’s only fire truck, a 1939 Seagrave pumper.

The fire station is visible in the background at far left.

  • Page number: 168-169
  • Photo number: 8-28
421. Five sailors man two Browning machine guns ( a .30-caliber and a .50-caliber) in a bomb crater at Kaneohe.
  • Page number: 170
  • Photo number: 8-29
422. Salvagers erect scaffolding under the wing of a PBY-5
  • Page number: 171
  • Photo number: 8-30
423. Wreckage of several PBYs on the seaplane ramp in front of Hangar 6
  • Page number: 170-171
  • Photo number: 8-31
424. The office area at Hangar 6
  • Page number: 172-173
  • Photo number: 8-32
425. Flotsam, fuel oil, and refuse collect on the shore of Ford Island
  • Page number: 172
  • Photo number: 8-33
426. Honolulu’s fire fighters and bystanders attempt to contain the blaze at Lunalilo School on Pumehaua Street
  • Page number: 173
  • Photo number: 8-34
427. Antiaircraft shells sometimes leveled entire structures, as shown here
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 8-35
428. Paul Goo’s demolished living room in his otherwise intact house
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 8-36
429. The “third extra” of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin on a civil defense worker’s desk
  • Page number: 174
  • Photo number: 8-37
430. Attention is riveted to the rostrum as President Franklin D. Roosevelt denounces the infamy of the Japanese Empire and asks a joint session of Congress to declare a state of war.
  • Page number: 175
  • Photo number: 8-38
Folder 4-19 Extras, 1940s - 1974

Box Photo 12
Folder 1-3 Extras, 1940s
Folder 4-5 Negatives, undated
Folder 6-7 Photocopied, 1930s- 1940s

Section: Unpublished

Folder 8 Curran, John, 1939 - 1940s
Folder 9-14 Finkel, Elliot, 1940s
Folder 15 Surrender Ceremony, 1940s
Folder 16 Miscellaneous, 1944 - 1977
Folder 17 1940s
Folder 18-19 Photocopied, 1940s