Summary Information
Title: Allegheny Conference On Community Development (Pittsburgh, Pa.), Photographs,
Collection Number: MSP#285
Creator: Allegheny Conference On Community Development (Pittsburgh, Pa.)
Collection Dates: 1892-1981
Extent: 33 linear feet (33 boxes)
Abstract:
The Allegheny Conference on Community Development is a nonprofit organization that works with the public and private sectors to improve the economy and quality of life of the Pittsburgh region. The organization has worked to curtail air pollution, establish Point State Park, consolidate public transit operations, assist minority-owned businesses, and develop Pittsburgh's Cultural District. The collection includes prints, negatives, and transparencies. The images document the large scope of the involvement of the Conference in the planning and redevelopment of the greater Pittsburgh region. A portion of the photographs in this collection have been digitized and are accessible online at http://images.library.pitt.edu/a/accd/.

Language:

The material in this collection is in English.

Repository:

Senator John Heinz History Center
Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania
1212 Smallman Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
412-454-6364
library@hswp.org
http://www.heinzhistorycenter.org/libraryArchives.aspx

Date Published:

May 2010
Author:

The guide to this collection was written by David R. Grinnell.
Encoder:

Encoded by Matt Strauss on April 28, 2010, from an existing finding aid.

History

The Allegheny Conference can trace its origins to a meeting of Richard King Mellon, Dr. Edward R. Weidlein, President of the Mellon Institute, and Wallace Richards, Secretary of the Pittsburgh Regional Planning Association, in Washington DC during the Winter of 1943. According to Weidlein, “We talked about the future of Pittsburgh in the Post War years and came to the conclusion that unless something was done, Pittsburgh would become a dying city.” (Lorant, p.381) Their thoughts evolved into the creation of an organization that would do research and study on the region, which would create a community improvement plan. Following this meeting Weidlein, Richards and Dr. Robert E. Doherty, President of Carnegie Institute of Technology, invited forty individuals from business, industry and politics for a luncheon at the William Penn in the Spring of 1943. Doherty presided at the meeting and outlined many of the problems faced by the community. It was then agreed to formally organize the group into what was then known as, the Allegheny Conference on Post-War Community Planning. Doherty was elected as the chairman, Weidlein as vice-chairman, Richards as secretary and later, Vincent Lanfear, Dean of the School of Business Administration at the University of Pittsburgh, as the treasurer. The main body of the Conference became known at the Citizens Sponsoring Committee. Soon, the Conference occupied office space in the Cathedral of Learning.

In 1944 the Citizens Sponsoring Committee approved the Incorporation of the Conference and its Bylaws, which established an Executive Committee. The Incorporators consist of: Doherty, Arthur E. Braun, L. W. Monterverde, J. Steele Gow, Alexander Reed, and Edgar J. Kaufmann. During this year, the Conference also altered its name to Allegheny Conference On Community Development. They establish new office in the Magee Building in downtown Pittsburgh. Willard E. Hotchkiss is listed as the Executive Director and presumable the first to hold that position. Some of the early working committees established by the Conference were: Economic Problems, Employment, Financial Resources, Health, Housing and Neighborhood Development, Land Use and Zoning, Legislation, Public Improvements, Highways, Mass Transportation, Parking, Refuse Disposal, Smoke Abatement, Stream Pollution Abatement, Water Supply, Recreation, Research Coordination, Welfare, Agriculture, Cultural Development and Smoke Abatement.

On February 1, 1945, Park H. Martin was hired as the second Executive Director. Under his leadership the Allegheny Conference had it first major victory, the passage of the Pittsburgh Package in the State Legislature. The Pittsburgh Package was a series of bills that helped to establish more smoke control in Allegheny County, insured the extension of the Penn-Lincoln parkway, new garbage disposal plants, the establishment of a Transit and Traffic Commission, permitting the State to take ownership of several bridges, establish a Parking Authority, establish a Department of Parks, and permitting the broadening of the tax base by allowing taxes on sources other than real estate. This was a huge step in insuring that local government agencies would have the power to move the Pittsburgh Region in a direction that was envisioned by local planners. In 1959, Martin accepted the position of Secretary of Highways for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Edward J. Magee succeeded Martin as the Executive Director. Under Magee the Conference continued it redevelopment of Point State Park, Gateway Center and the Lower Hill. The coordination of these projects proved to be a major coup for Magee. He later resigned in 1968.

Robert B. Pease, the former Executive Director of the Pittsburgh Redevelopment Authority, succeeded Magee as the Executive Director of the Allegheny Conference. Under Pease’s leadership the Conference’s focus was expanded to include more about the living conditions and climate of the citizens of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County. After the explosion of the racial riots in 1968, the Conference instituted a program to assists minority business growth. They established programs that would encourage minorities to open businesses, they provided leadership training for them and also low interest loans and grants. These programs were coordinated with local banks, business leaders and social service groups.

Pease remained the Executive Director until 1992. He had one the longest tenure in that position to date. Under his leadership Pittsburghers saw the rise of Three Rivers Stadium, the USX Tower, Oxford Center, Fifth Avenue Place, and PPG Place. The Offices of the Conference moved from the Magee Building after the construction of the USX Tower. In the Tower, the Conference had a suite of offices designed for its multifaceted work.

In 1992, Richard Stafford took over the leadership of the Conference as the Executive Director. Recently, with the construction of the new headquarters of ALCOA on the North Shore, the Conference Offices have moved the old ALCOA building. It continues to be active as a cooperative agency.


Collection Scope and Content Note

The Allegheny Conference On Community Development Photographs are housed in 30 archival boxes and are arranged in these four series: Prints, Negatives, Transparencies and Oversized. A portion of the photographs in this collection have been digitized and are accessible online at http://images.library.pitt.edu/a/accd/.

Series I: Prints (1892-1981)

The Prints Series is divided into nineteen Sub-series according to topic. The sub-series headings are, for the most, consistent with how these photographs were originally arranged by the ACCD. The Sub-series are arranged alphabetically and are housed in twenty-three Archival Boxes.

Sub-Series I: Aviation (1948-ca 1955)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of two airports in the Pittsburgh Area; the Allegheny County Airport (West Mifflin, PA) and the Greater Pittsburgh Airport (Findlay Township, PA). Most of these images are of airfields and terminal buildings. For the Greater Pittsburgh Airport researchers will also find construction scenes and some interior shots. The photographs are arranged in alphabetically.

Sub-Series II: Buildings (1930-1981)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of buildings, concentrating in the Golden Triangle area of the City of Pittsburgh. Most of these images are of architectural concepts & models, site demolition, construction, and completed structures. Of special note is a single folder labeled “Religious Buildings” which includes images of several Pittsburgh area churches and synagogues. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the name of the building or by topical. When there is a topical folder heading every attempt has been made to list its content in the container list as well as on the exterior of the individual folders.

Sub-Series III: Culture (1939-1971)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of cultural events and organizations in and around Pittsburgh. Many of the images are of classroom scenes and performances. Also included are some photographs of the buildings that house these cultural programs and groups. Of special note are the building proposals for the Center For The Arts and the Lower Hill Cultural Center, which were early concepts that resulted in the building of the Civic Arena. The photographs are arranged in alphabetically by the name of the group or organization.

Sub-Series IV: Education (1930-1970)

This Sub-Series is arranged into two main sections, Institutions and Job Training. The Institutions section consists of photographs of various schools, colleges and universities around the Pittsburgh Area. The images are of various campus buildings and architectural concepts of proposed buildings. Some informal student photographs may be found in the “Community College of Allegheny County” folder. The Job Training section consists largely of classroom settings for student training in specific career areas. These photographs are arranged alphabetically by the institutions name and by the name of professions represented.

Sub-Series V: Golden Triangle (1923-1977)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of the redevelopment of the Golden Triangle area of the City of Pittsburgh. This area includes the development of the Gateway Center and Point State Park. Included are the various artistic concepts of proposed redevelopment, aerial views, demolition of sites, construction of buildings and the park, and completed structures. These photographs are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Sub-Series VI: Health & Welfare (1940-1965)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of Pittsburgh area Hospitals and Medical Facilities. Included are many architectural concepts, construction, and completed buildings. The photographs are arranged in alphabetically by the name of the institution.

Sub-Series VII: Highways (1892-1968)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of roadways and bridges found in mostly in Allegheny County. Of special note is the large section of Penn-Lincoln Parkway photographs. Included are images of architectural concepts, construction, and completed roads and structures. Another significant photograph is of the Sixth Street Bridge designed by John A. Roebling. Roebling, famous for building the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, designed in 1846 the original Smithfield Street Bridge and in 1859 the Sixth Street Bridge. Neither of the Roebling Bridges have survived in Pittsburgh. For a full account of Roebling’s work, please consult David McCullough’s book, The Great Bridge. For more information on many of bridges of Pittsburgh please consult The Bridges of Pittsburgh by Joseph White and M. W. von Bernewirtz. Both titles can be found in Library of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the name of the roadway and bridge.

Sub-Series VIII: Historical (1893-ca 1950)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of historical buildings and images of Pennsylvania. Included are many reproductions of prints, engravings and maps from the early settlement of Pittsburgh and its surroundings. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by topic or location.

Sub-Series IX: Housing (ca 1930-1981)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of residential areas and apartment buildings in the Pittsburgh area. Included are images of redevelopment of sites (before and after), construction, and completed structures. Of special note are the photographs in the “Public Housing” folder of Gazzam & Ruch Hills, located in the Hill District, before redevelopment into public housing units. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Sub-Series X: Miscellaneous (1945-1978)

This Sub-series consists of various photographs that are arranged alphabetically by topic. Included are photographs of neighborhoods in Pittsburgh, parking facilities, social action activities and programs, and groups. Of special note are photographs of exhibits that were produced by the ACCD, the Floods that have taken place in the Pittsburgh area, and the site demolition and construction of Mellon Square in downtown Pittsburgh.

Sub-Series XI: PA Pitt Partner’s Program (1950)

This Sub-series consist of photographs of the activities of this program that the ACCD was involved. There main function seems to have been centered around the cleaning-up of the city. This program was also very involved with the development of the Parklets throughout the city. Photographs of the Parklets can be found in the Recreation Sub-series. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Sub-series XII: People (1950-ca 1959)

This Sub-series consists largely of photographs of individuals that were members of the ACCD board and staff. Included are a few group shots of the Annual Dinners, Executive Board and Governor’s Dinner. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the name of the individual or event.

Sub-Series XIII: Publications (1952-1981)

This Sub-series consists of photographs used by the ACCD in its publications. It would be beneficial to consult the Annual Reports of the ACCD, located in the vertical files of the Library of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania, too see how the photographs were used. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the title of the publication.

Sub-Series XIV: Recreation (1937-1970)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of various recreational sites and activities throughout the Western Pennsylvania region and into West Virginia. Included are several folders of Pittsburgh’s Highland Park Zoo. Of special note is the many folders of Parklets built in the City of Pittsburgh through the assistance of the PA Pitt Partner’s Program of the ACCD. The Parklet photographs include many scenes of children at play, Before and After shots, and dedication ceremonies. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the name of the site.

Sub-series XV: Research (ca 1950-1960)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of various research institutions and laboratories in the Pittsburgh area. Many of the institutions represented are from the business and industry sector. Included are photographs of buildings and laboratory interiors. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the name of the institution.

Sub-Series XVI: Smoke Control (1947-1959)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of various causes of smoke pollution in the Pittsburgh area. The ACCD was involved in the United Smoke Council, which succeeded in securing legislation to control smoke pollution. Included are photos of “Before and After” Smoke Control scenes and industrial causes. Of special note is the folder “Railroads,” which includes images of locomotives from various railroad companies. The Railroad industry was one of the greatest opponents to Smoke Control legislation. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Sub-Series XVII: Stadiums (ca 1909-1970)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of various sports facilities in the City of Pittsburgh. Included are photographs of Exposition Park sketches and early Forbes Field scenes. Of special note are the photographs of Three Rivers Stadium which includes architectural concepts, site before redevelopment and construction. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the name of the facility.

Sub-Series XVIII: Transportation (1930-1957)

This Sub-series consists of photographs concerning the various modes of transportation in the Pittsburgh area. Of special note are the photographs of several of the inclines that no longer exist. Also of significance are the photographs of the Pennsylvania and B & O Railroads, which were large and important operations in the Pittsburgh region. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Sub-Series XIX: Urban Redevelopment (1947-1969)

This Sub-series consists of photographs of areas that had be proposed sites for redevelopment. Not all of these sites were redeveloped. Included are photographs of demolition of property in the downtown area and the Hill District. Of significance are the concepts of The Pittsburgh Center, showing the various areas of downtown Pittsburgh slated to be redeveloped. This sub-series also includes photographs of possible redevelopment of areas outside the City of Pittsburgh as well. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the name of the municipality.

Series II: Negatives (1935-1987)

This Series consist largely of images found in the prints series. The Negatives are arranged in the same format as the prints series, including the identical sub-series headings, with the exception of a Research Sub-series. Please consult the “scope and content note” for the prints when researching the negatives also. One additional sub-series, labeled Glass Plate Negatives, was added to the end of this series.

Sub-Series XIX: Glass Plate Negatives (1920)

This sub-series consists of seven glass plate negatives. They include unidentified groups, industrial workers, a railroad worker and the construction of the Bigelow Boulevard wall. The are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Series III: Transparencies (1963-1977)

This series consists of transparencies of images that fall into these previously described sub-series headings, Buildings, Culture, Golden Triangle, Miscellaneous, Recreation, Smoke Control and Transportation. The Transparencies are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Series IV: Oversized Prints & Negatives (1963-1985)

This series consists of prints and negatives that are oversized. They have been separated from the collection and are be located at MSR# 285. The images fall into these previously described sub-series headings, Golden Triangle, Miscellaneous, Personnel, Publications and Smoke Control. The prints and negatives are arranged alphabetically by topic.


Access and Use
Access Restrictions:

Some of the photographs in this collection originate from the Carnegie Public Library. Reproductions of these photographs must be arranged through the Carnegie Public Library.

The Glass Plate negatives located in Box 28 are fragile and must be handled under staff supervision.

Aquisition Information:

These materials were received in one accession, Accession # 1994.0314, in August 1994.

Preferred Citation:

Allegheny Conference On Community Development (Pittsburgh, Pa.), Photographs, 1892-1981, MSP 285, Library and Archives Division, Senator John Heinz History Center

Processing Information:

This collection was processed by David R. Grinnell in June 1998.

Copyright:

Property rights reside with the Senator John Heinz History Center. Literary rights are retained by the creators of the records and their heirs. For permission to reproduce or publish, please contact the Library and Archives of the Senator John Heinz History Center.

Separated Material:
Allegheny Conference On Community Development (Pittsburgh, Pa.), Records, MSS 285.

To the Printed Collection--Duplicates of many of the reports and publications have been cataloged separately in the Library.


Contents List
To view a detailed contents list for this collection, please contact the Heinz History Center's Library and Archives.